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Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Apple, Microsoft wield privacy as marketing tool | ITworld - 1 views

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    [Apple and Microsoft are both taking steps to better explain how they handle customers' personal information]
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    [Apple and Microsoft are both taking steps to better explain how they handle customers' personal information]
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

US desperately defends Safe Harbour scheme, says it never uses "indiscriminate surveill... - 2 views

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    "US tells EU's highest court not to interfere with its data-slurping-with-impunity agreement. by Glyn Moody - Sep 29, 2015 4:00pm CEST"
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Campaign | Access | Stop expansion of mass surveillance in France! - 0 views

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    "France is on the verge of passing a repressive new surveillance bill. On May 5th, the French Parliament will vote on a dangerous proposal which would allow intelligence services to violate user privacy and harm freedom of expression."
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Surveillance Self-Defense | Tips, Tools and How-tos for Safer Online Communications - 0 views

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    "Tips, Tools and How-tos for Safer Online Communications"
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    "Tips, Tools and How-tos for Safer Online Communications"
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Academics Against Mass Surveillance - 2 views

Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Stallman: How Much Surveillance Can Democracy Withstand? | Wired Opinion | Wired.com - 1 views

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    "Editor's Note: Given Richard Stallman's longtime role in promoting software that respects user freedom (including GNU, which just turned 30), his suggested "remedies" for all the ways technology can be re-designed to provide benefits while avoiding surveillance - like the smart meters example he shares below - seem particularly relevant."
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Opt out of PRISM, the NSA's global data surveillance program - PRISM Break - 0 views

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    "Use a combination of Tor Browser and another free browser to surf the web. Try to use Tor for as many things as possible. Browsing the web may be slower, but it will offer you far better anonymity. Make sure to learn the basics of Tor before using it."
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

The SSD Project | EFF Surveillance Self-Defense Project - 2 views

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    "The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) has created this Surveillance Self-Defense site to educate the American public about the law and technology of government surveillance in the United States, providing the information and tools necessary to evaluate the threat of surveillance and take appropriate steps to defend against it. "
Paul Merrell

Google starts watching what you do off the Internet too - RT - 1 views

  • The most powerful company on the Internet just got a whole lot creepier: a new service from Google merges offline consumer info with online intelligence, allowing advertisers to target users based on what they do at the keyboard and at the mall. Without much fanfare, Google announced news this week of a new advertising project, Conversions API, that will let businesses build all-encompassing user profiles based off of not just what users search for on the Web, but what they purchase outside of the home. In a blog post this week on Google’s DoubleClick Search site, the Silicon Valley giant says that targeting consumers based off online information only allows advertisers to learn so much. “Conversions,” tech-speak for the digital metric made by every action a user makes online, are incomplete until coupled with real life data, Google says.
  • Of course, there is always the possibility that all of this information can be unencrypted and, in some cases, obtained by third-parties that you might not want prying into your personal business. Edwards notes in his report that Google does not explicitly note that intelligence used in Conversions API will be anonymized, but the blowback from not doing as much would sure be enough to start a colossal uproar. Meanwhile, however, all of the information being collected by Google — estimated to be on millions of servers around the globe — is being handed over to more than just advertising companies. Last month Google reported that the US government requested personal information from roughly 8,000 individual users during just the first few months of 2012.“This is the sixth time we’ve released this data, and one trend has become clear: Government surveillance is on the rise,” Google admitted with their report.
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