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Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Money And Power: The Real Reason For The NSA Spying On Everyone | Techdirt - 1 views

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    "from the money-money-money dept More than four years ago, we wrote about all the buzz that you were hearing about "cyberwar" was little more than an attempt to drum up FUD to get the government to throw billions of dollars at private contractors. "
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Yes, the NSA Worried About Whether Spying Would Backfire | WIRED - 1 views

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    ""For all the time I worked on all of these issues, this was a constant discussion," Olsen says. "How do we calibrate what we're trying to do for the country with how to protect civil liberties and privacy?""
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    NSA can't credibly claim surprise at how people reacted to the Snowden disclosures. NSA's spying on U.S. citizens was first uncovered by the Senate's Church Committee in about 1976. Congress enacted legslation unequivocally telling NSA and the Defense Department that spying on Americans was not to happen again (and that the CIA was to immediately cease spying within the territorial boundaries of the U.S.). Then came the Total Information Awareness scandal, when Congress discovered that DoD was right back at it again, this time operating from under the cover of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. Congress responded by abolishing the program and eliminating the job position of its director, former Admiral John Poindexter of Iran/Contra scandal fame. But rather than complying with the abolition order, most of the TIA program's staff, hardware, software, and data was simply transferred to NSA. NSA, of course, persuaded the Justice Department to secretly reinterpret key provisions of the Patriot Act more broadly than a First Grade preschooler would allow to continue spying on U.S. citizens. Indeed, anyone whose college education included the assignment to read and discuss George Orwell's 1984 would have known that NSA's program had drastically outgrown the limits of what a free society would tolerate. So this is really about deliberate defiance of the limits established by the Constitution and Congressional enactments, not about anything even remotely legal or morally acceptable. The fact that Congress did not react strongly after the Snowden disclosures, as it had after the Church Committee's report and discovery of the TIA program raises a strong suspicion that members of Congress have been blackmailed into submission using information about them gathered via NSA surveillance. We know from whistleblowers Edward Snowden and Russell Tice that members of Congress were surveilled by NSA, yet not even that violation has been taken up by Congress. Instead
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Federal court rules in favor of NSA bulk snooping, White House happy - RT USA - 3 views

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    "Despite the opposition of the US public and lawmakers to NSA surveillance, the courts keep handing the Obama administration the license to snoop. A US appeals court just threw out a 2013 verdict against the NSA, to White House approval. "
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    I've read the court's decision. The article in RT overstates the breadth of the court's holding very substantially. The court did not throw the case out. Instead, by a 2-1 vote it vacated the district court's grant of a preliminary injunction and remanded the case for further proceedings including for the lower court judge to decide whether discovery should be allowed. The third judge would have thrown the case out. The decision does, however, steepen the slope the plaintiffs must climb to prevail in a renewed effort to obtain an injunction. That is regrettable, in my view. The article states: "The decision vindicates the government's stance that NSA's bulk surveillance programs are constitutional, the White House said Friday." In fact, the court's decision does not even touch on the topic of the program's constitutionality, reaching only the issue of standing. The article should either have omitted the statement or pointed out the error in the government's statement.
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    # ! thank You, Paul, for the observation. anyway, what it seems is that Citizens worldwide are going to be spied... judges aside, and -I'm afraid- not always with 'security issues' in the Agency's mind...
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    I agree, Gonzalo. Most of the "terrorist" groups the U.S. claims to be concerned with were in fact created by the U.S. Terrorism is simply the easiest means for the government to defend these surveillance programs. But the disclosures that the NSA spies for other purposes just doesn't get the coverage in mainstream media that might otherwise force changes. It's the Politics of Fear.
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Does NSA Spying Leave the U.S. Without Moral High Ground in China Hack? - NationalJourn... - 0 views

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    "Was the breach of federal employee records all that different from U.S. surveillance programs? By Brendan Sasso Follow on Twitter"
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Twitter moves non-US accounts to Ireland away from the NSA - 0 views

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    "Twitter has updated its privacy policy, creating a two-lane service that treats US and non-US users differently. If you live in the US, your account is controlled by San Francisco-based Twitter Inc, but if you're elsewhere in the world (anywhere else) it's handled by Twitter International Company in Dublin, Ireland. The changes also affect Periscope."
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Germany's Spies Grab 11 Billion Pieces Of Phone Metadata A Year -- And Pass On 6 Billio... - 1 views

    • Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.
       
      [U.S. Spying On Europe: EU Confronts Washington Reports Of Spying On Allies [06/30/2013] ]
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    "from the bad-sex dept Given Germany's high-profile attachment to privacy, it's always interesting to hear about ways in which its spies have been ignoring that tradition. Here, for example, is a story in the German newspaper Die Zeit about the country's foreign intelligence agency BND gathering metadata from millions of phone records every day: "
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    "from the bad-sex dept Given Germany's high-profile attachment to privacy, it's always interesting to hear about ways in which its spies have been ignoring that tradition. Here, for example, is a story in the German newspaper Die Zeit about the country's foreign intelligence agency BND gathering metadata from millions of phone records every day: "
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

NSA Spying: Now It's Personal | Electronic Frontier Foundation - 1 views

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    "Imagine that you watched a police officer in your neighborhood stop ten completely ordinary people every day just to take a look inside their vehicle or backpack. Now imagine that nine of those people are never even accused of a crime. They just happened to be in the wrong place at the wrong time. Even the most law-abiding person would eventually protest this treatment. In fact-they have.[1]"
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    "Imagine that you watched a police officer in your neighborhood stop ten completely ordinary people every day just to take a look inside their vehicle or backpack. Now imagine that nine of those people are never even accused of a crime. They just happened to be in the wrong place at the wrong time. Even the most law-abiding person would eventually protest this treatment. In fact-they have.[1]"
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Anonymizing Networks - GNU/Linux - PRISM Break - 0 views

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    "e Recommendations freenet.png Freenet Decentralized censorship-resistant network. gnunet.png GNUnet GNUnet is a fully free P2P network. i2p.png I2P The invisible internet project. syndie.png Syndie Distributed, anonymous forum software. tor.png Tor Free software for enabling online anonymity. Tor directs Internet traffic through a free, worldwide, volunteer network consisting of more th… "
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

TOR IS THE NSA [LWN.net, 2008] - 0 views

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    "Posted Jul 9, 2008 21:13 UTC (Wed) by dulles (guest, #45450) Parent article: GNU/Linux free software tools to preserve your online privacy, anonymity and security (FSM)"
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Reset the Net to Shut Off NSA Spying | PopularResistance.Org, June 5th - 1 views

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    "Everyone has a role to play. If you're a developer, promise to add one new surveillance-resistant feature to your app or website, and announce it on June 5th. If you're an Internet user, promise to try out one new privacy tool that directly confronts mass surveillance. We'll have an epic and definitive list for you to choose from. Then tell your friends to get protected too. If you have a website or Tumblr, get the Internet Defense League code installed and display the Reset the Net message on June 5th to help educate and rally Internet users worldwide to defend themselves from dragnet surveillance."
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Academics Against Mass Surveillance - 2 views

Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

How do we know that Linux doesn't have a government backdoor? : linux - 2 views

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    "I'm a big advocate of Linux and one of the reasons for that is because I believe it is more secure than other proprietary operating systems and hopefully less likely to include some sort of government backdoor. With the recent US government surveillance scandals going on it has me thinking, is Linux really more secure?"
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