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Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

My Netflix, My Privacy | OpenMedia [# ! Note] - 0 views

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    "ews reports say Netflix has already begun blocking paying customers who are using privacy-protecting services like virtual private networks (VPNs).1,2 The move comes in response to pressure from media giants3 who want to 'geoblock' us from our favourite content.4 Blocking VPNs means innocent customers will become collateral damage: it will block VPN users from accessing domestic content they paid for,5 undermine privacy,6 and could push users to illegal alternatives.7 "
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Cox Refuses to Spy on Subscribers to Catch Pirates - TorrentFreak [# ! Note] - 0 views

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    " Ernesto on February 15, 2016 C: 70 Breaking Cox Communications is objecting to a broad permanent injunction requested by music publisher BMG. The music group wants the ISP to spy on its subscribers and take action against those who download pirated material. Cox informs the court that these demands are overbroad, vague and possibly illegal."
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Torrent From the Cloud With Seedr - TorrentFreak - 0 views

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    " Andy on January 17, 2016 C: 92 News Most people download torrents with desktop clients such as uTorrent but with a simple user interface and tiny learning curve, Seedr takes torrenting into the cloud. Hiding users' IP addresses from the public and with a totally free tier to get people started, the service is rapidly gaining traction."
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Guide: Anonymity and Privacy for Advanced Linux Users - Deep Dot Web - 1 views

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    "All Credits go to beac0n, thanks for contacting us and contributing the guide you created! As people requested - here is a link to download this guide as a PDF. Intro The goal is to bring together enough information in one document for a beginner to get started. Visiting countless sites, and combing the internet for information can make it obvious your desire to obtain anonymity, and lead to errors, due to conflicting information. Every effort has been made to make this document accurate. This guide is image heavy so it may take some time to load via Tor."
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Missteps in Europe's Online Privacy Bill - NYTimes.com - 0 views

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    "By THE EDITORIAL BOARD December 21, 2015 The European Union could soon adopt a law that would strengthen online privacy protections for consumers, but it would come at a cost to free expression and leave a redacted history for Internet users."
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Enabling private conversations online | FreedomBox Foundation - 0 views

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    "We're building software for smart devices whose engineered purpose is to work together to facilitate free communication among people, safely and securely, beyond the ambition of the strongest power to penetrate. They can make freedom of thought and information a permanent, ineradicable feature of the net that holds our souls. "
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

SAFE Network - Privacy, Security and Freedom - 0 views

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    "SAFE is a peer-to-peer data storage network that enables developers to build scalable apps."
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    "SAFE is a peer-to-peer data storage network that enables developers to build scalable apps."
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Contribute Anonymously To Git Repositories Over Tor With Gitnonymous Project - 0 views

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    "Short Bytes: With gitnonymous project, now you can obfuscate your true identity while making Git commits and pushing to public repositories. Using the instructions given on the GitHub page, learn to setup your anonymous account."
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Cyber bill's final language likely to anger privacy advocates | TheHill - 0 views

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    "By Cory Bennett - 12/07/15 09:55 AM EST Digital rights advocates are in an uproar as the final text of a major cybersecurity bill appears to lack some of the privacy community's favored clauses. In the last few weeks, House and Senate negotiators have been working unofficially to reach a compromise between multiple versions of a cyber bill that would encourage businesses to share more data on hacking threats with the government."
Paul Merrell

Microsoft to host data in Germany to evade US spying | Naked Security - 0 views

  • Microsoft's new plan to keep the US government's hands off its customers' data: Germany will be a safe harbor in the digital privacy storm. Microsoft on Wednesday announced that beginning in the second half of 2016, it will give foreign customers the option of keeping data in new European facilities that, at least in theory, should shield customers from US government surveillance. It will cost more, according to the Financial Times, though pricing details weren't forthcoming. Microsoft Cloud - including Azure, Office 365 and Dynamics CRM Online - will be hosted from new datacenters in the German regions of Magdeburg and Frankfurt am Main. Access to data will be controlled by what the company called a German data trustee: T-Systems, a subsidiary of the independent German company Deutsche Telekom. Without the permission of Deutsche Telekom or customers, Microsoft won't be able to get its hands on the data. If it does get permission, the trustee will still control and oversee Microsoft's access.
  • Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella dropped the word "trust" into the company's statement: Microsoft’s mission is to empower every person and every individual on the planet to achieve more. Our new datacenter regions in Germany, operated in partnership with Deutsche Telekom, will not only spur local innovation and growth, but offer customers choice and trust in how their data is handled and where it is stored.
  • On Tuesday, at the Future Decoded conference in London, Nadella also announced that Microsoft would, for the first time, be opening two UK datacenters next year. The company's also expanding its existing operations in Ireland and the Netherlands. Officially, none of this has anything to do with the long-drawn-out squabbling over the transatlantic Safe Harbor agreement, which the EU's highest court struck down last month, calling the agreement "invalid" because it didn't protect data from US surveillance. No, Nadella said, the new datacenters and expansions are all about giving local businesses and organizations "transformative technology they need to seize new global growth." But as Diginomica reports, Microsoft EVP of Cloud and Enterprise Scott Guthrie followed up his boss’s comments by saying that yes, the driver behind the new datacenters is to let customers keep data close: We can guarantee customers that their data will always stay in the UK. Being able to very concretely tell that story is something that I think will accelerate cloud adoption further in the UK.
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  • Microsoft and T-Systems' lawyers may well think that storing customer data in a German trustee data center will protect it from the reach of US law, but for all we know, that could be wishful thinking. Forrester cloud computing analyst Paul Miller: To be sure, we must wait for the first legal challenge. And the appeal. And the counter-appeal. As with all new legal approaches, we don’t know it is watertight until it is challenged in court. Microsoft and T-Systems’ lawyers are very good and say it's watertight. But we can be sure opposition lawyers will look for all the holes. By keeping data offshore - particularly in Germany, which has strong data privacy laws - Microsoft could avoid the situation it's now facing with the US demanding access to customer emails stored on a Microsoft server in Dublin. The US has argued that Microsoft, as a US company, comes under US jurisdiction, regardless of where it keeps its data.
  • Running away to Germany isn't a groundbreaking move; other US cloud services providers have already pledged expansion of their EU presences, including Amazon's plan to open a UK datacenter in late 2016 that will offer what CTO Werner Vogels calls "strong data sovereignty to local users." Other big data operators that have followed suit: Salesforce, which has already opened datacenters in the UK and Germany and plans to open one in France next year, as well as new EU operations pledged for the new year by NetSuite and Box. Can Germany keep the US out of its datacenters? Can Ireland? Time, and court cases, will tell.
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    The European Community's Court of Justice decision in the Safe Harbor case --- and Edward Snowden --- are now officially downgrading the U.S. as a cloud data center location. NSA is good business for Europeans looking to displace American cloud service providers, as evidenced by Microsoft's decision. The legal test is whether Microsoft has "possession, custody, or control" of the data. From the info given in the article, it seems that Microsoft has done its best to dodge that bullet by moving data centers to Germany and placing their data under the control of a European company. Do ownership of the hardware and profits from their rent mean that Microsoft still has "possession, custody, or control" of the data? The fine print of the agreement with Deutsche Telekom and the customer EULAs will get a thorough going over by the Dept. of Justice for evidence of Microsoft "control" of the data. That will be the crucial legal issue. The data centers in Germany may pass the test. But the notion that data centers in the UK can offer privacy is laughable; the UK's legal authority for GCHQ makes it even easier to get the data than the NSA can in the U.S.  It doesn't even require a court order. 
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Tor Director Accuses FBI of Spending $1 Million to Attack Tor Users - 1 views

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    "Short Bytes: In a blog post, Tor Director has outlined the unethical ways that were employed by FBI to unmask Tor users. He added that the invasion of people's privacy on a wholesale level is unacceptable by crossing the ethical lines between research and targeting innocent users."
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

The future is the Internet of Things-deal with it | Ars Technica UK - 0 views

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    "IoT is about to explode, perhaps literally, if privacy and security issues aren't fixed. by Sean Gallagher (US) - Oct 30, 2015 9:50am CET"
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Europe's 'Net Neutrality' Could Allow Torrent and VPN Throttling - TorrentFreak - 0 views

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    " By Ernesto on October 22, 2015 C: 65 News Next week the European Parliament will vote on Europe's new telecoms regulation which includes net neutrality rules. While the legislation is a step forward for many countries, experts and activists warn that it may leave the door open for BitTorrent and VPN throttling if key amendments fail to pass. "
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

letsencrypt | How It Works - 0 views

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    "Anyone who has gone through the trouble of setting up a secure website knows what a hassle getting and maintaining a certificate can be. Let's Encrypt automates away the pain and lets site operators turn on and manage HTTPS with simple commands. No validation emails, no complicated configuration editing, no expired certificates breaking your website. And of course, because Let's Encrypt provides certificates for free, no need to arrange payment. This page describes how to carry out the most common certificate management functions using the Let's Encrypt client. You're welcome to use any compatible client, but we only provide instructions for using the client that we provide. If you'd like to know more about how this works behind the scenes, check out our technical overview."
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    "Anyone who has gone through the trouble of setting up a secure website knows what a hassle getting and maintaining a certificate can be. Let's Encrypt automates away the pain and lets site operators turn on and manage HTTPS with simple commands. No validation emails, no complicated configuration editing, no expired certificates breaking your website. And of course, because Let's Encrypt provides certificates for free, no need to arrange payment. This page describes how to carry out the most common certificate management functions using the Let's Encrypt client. You're welcome to use any compatible client, but we only provide instructions for using the client that we provide. If you'd like to know more about how this works behind the scenes, check out our technical overview."
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

The U.N. wants to connect the world to the Internet. That's not enough. - 0 views

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    "But connectivity alone cannot be global policy. Respect for privacy and the freedom of expression must go hand in glove with the drive to connection."
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

US government won't seek encryption-backdoor legislation | Ars Technica UK [# ! Note] - 0 views

    • Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.
       
      # ! Presidential Elections 2016 coming...
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    "FBI Director James Comey told a congressional panel that the Obama administration won't ask Congress for legislation requiring the tech sector to install backdoors into their products so the authorities can access encrypted data."
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    "FBI Director James Comey told a congressional panel that the Obama administration won't ask Congress for legislation requiring the tech sector to install backdoors into their products so the authorities can access encrypted data."
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Apple, Microsoft wield privacy as marketing tool | ITworld - 1 views

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    [Apple and Microsoft are both taking steps to better explain how they handle customers' personal information]
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    [Apple and Microsoft are both taking steps to better explain how they handle customers' personal information]
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

US desperately defends Safe Harbour scheme, says it never uses "indiscriminate surveill... - 2 views

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    "US tells EU's highest court not to interfere with its data-slurping-with-impunity agreement. by Glyn Moody - Sep 29, 2015 4:00pm CEST"
Paul Merrell

'UK surveillance is worse than 1984' says UN privacy chief (Wired UK) - 0 views

  • The UN's newly appointed special rapporteur on privacy, Joseph Cannataci, has described digital surveillance in the UK as "worse" than anything imagined in George Orwell's totalitarian dystopia 1984.Speaking to the Guardian, Cannataci -- who doesn't own a Facebook account or use Twitter -- lambasted the oversight of British digital surveillance as "a rather bad joke at its citizens' expense".Warning against the steady erosion of privacy and increasing levels of government intrusion, he also drew sinister parallels with Orwell's vision of a mass-surveilled society, adding that today's reality was far worse than the fiction: "At least Winston [a character in Orwell's 1984] was able to go out in the countryside and go under a tree and expect there wouldn't be any screen, as it was called. Whereas today there are many parts of the English countryside where there are more cameras than George Orwell could ever have imagined."
  • Cannataci, who holds posts as a professor of technology of law at the University of Groningen, and as head of the department of Information Policy and Governance at the University of Malta, also called for a "Geneva convention-style law" for the internet. "Some people may not want to buy into it. But you know, if one takes the attitude that some countries will not play ball, then, for example, the chemical weapons agreement would never have come about."
  • As part of his new role -- which elevates digital privacy to the same level of importance as other human rights -- Cannataci has vowed to begin systematically reviewing government policies and the business models of large corporations, which he accuses of "very often taking the data that you never even knew they were taking". Although the privacy chief admits that his mandate is more than likely "impossible to achieve in the next three years", he stressed the importance of a "longer-term view" in an effort to help protect people's data and safeguard their digital rights.
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Voice of the Masses: What's next for Firefox? | Linux Voice - 0 views

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    " Mike Saunders | July 8, 2015 | Voice of the masses | 28 Comments It's been a topsy-turvy few years for the Firefox web browser. Competition from Chrome, interface redesigns, integration of services like Pocket, and the controversial adoption of Adobe's DRM module have pushed many to consider other browsers. Now Firefox "
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