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Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

7 Mistakes New Linux Users Make - Datamation - 1 views

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    "Switching to a Linux desktop can be a bewildering experience for those used to proprietary systems."
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    "Switching to a Linux desktop can be a bewildering experience for those used to proprietary systems."
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

BitTorrent Traffic Share Drops to New Low - TorrentFreak - 0 views

    • Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.
       
      # ! "don't believe everything You hear..." # ! ;)
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    " Ernesto on September 18, 2015 C: 49 Breaking New data published by Canadian network management company Sandvine reveals that BitTorrent's share of total Internet traffic during peak hours is going down. For the first time since the file-sharing boom began it has dropped below 10% in Europe and the same downward trend is visible in the Asia-Pacific region."
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    " Ernesto on September 18, 2015 C: 49 Breaking New data published by Canadian network management company Sandvine reveals that BitTorrent's share of total Internet traffic during peak hours is going down. For the first time since the file-sharing boom began it has dropped below 10% in Europe and the same downward trend is visible in the Asia-Pacific region."
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Statute of Anne - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - 0 views

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    "The Statute of Anne (c.19), an act of the Parliament of Great Britain, was the first statute to provide for copyright regulated by the government and courts, rather than by private parties. Prior to the statute's enactment in 1710, copying restrictions were authorized by the Licensing Act of 1662. These restrictions were enforced by the Stationers' Company, a guild of printers given the exclusive power to print-and the responsibility to censor-literary works. The censorship administered under the Licensing Act led to public protest; as the act had to be renewed at two-year intervals, authors and others sought to prevent its reauthorisation.[1] In 1694, Parliament refused to renew the Licensing Act, ending the Stationers' monopoly and press restrictions.[2]"
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