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Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

TCP Flaw Opens Linux Systems to Hijackers | Software | LinuxInsider - 0 views

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    "By Richard Adhikari Aug 11, 2016 4:09 PM PT A flaw in the RFC 5961 specification the Internet Engineering Task Force developed to protect TCP against blind in-window attacks could threaten Android smartphones, as well as every Linux computer on the planet. [*Correction - Aug. 12, 2016]"
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Windows 10 is spying on almost everything you do - here's how to opt out | BGR - 0 views

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    "But there's something you should know: As you read this article from your newly upgraded PC, Windows 10 is also spying on nearly everything you do."
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

LKML: Ima Sheep: Linux 4.0 released - 0 views

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    "Date Sun, 12 Apr 2015 15:41:30 -0700 Subject Linux 4.0 released From Ima Sheep <> So I decided to release 4.0 as per the normal schedule, because there really weren't any known issues, and while I'll be traveling during the end of the upcoming week due to a college visit, I'm hoping that won't affect the merge window very much. We'll see."
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    "Date Sun, 12 Apr 2015 15:41:30 -0700 Subject Linux 4.0 released From Ima Sheep <> So I decided to release 4.0 as per the normal schedule, because there really weren't any known issues, and while I'll be traveling during the end of the upcoming week due to a college visit, I'm hoping that won't affect the merge window very much. We'll see."
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

The Linux desktop battle (and why it matters) - TechRepublic - 2 views

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    Jack Wallen ponders the problem with the ever-lagging acceptance of the Linux desktop and poses a radical solution.
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    "Jack Wallen ponders the problem with the ever-lagging acceptance of the Linux desktop and poses a radical solution. Linux desktop I have been using Ubuntu Unity for a very long time. In fact, I would say that this is, by far, the longest I've stuck with a single desktop interface. Period. That doesn't mean I don't stop to smell the desktop roses along the Linux path. In fact, I've often considered other desktops as a drop-in replacement for Unity. GNOME and Budgie have vied for my attention of late. Both are solid takes on the desktop that offer a minimalistic, modern look and feel (something I prefer) and help me get my work done with an efficiency other desktops can't match. What I see across the Linux landscape, however, often takes me by surprise. While Microsoft and Apple continue to push the idea of the user interface forward, a good amount of the Linux community seems bent on holding us in a perpetual state of "90s computing." Consider Xfce, Mate, and Cinnamon -- three very popular Linux desktop interfaces that work with one very common thread... not changing for the sake of change. Now, this can be considered a very admirable cause when it's put in place to ensure that user experience (UX) is as positive as possible. What this idea does, however, is deny the idea that change can affect an even more efficient and positive UX. When I spin up a distribution that makes use of Xfce, Mate, or Cinnamon, I find the environments work well and get the job done. At the same time, I feel as if the design of the desktops is trapped in the wrong era. At this point, you're certainly questioning the validity and path of this post. If the desktops work well and help you get the job done, what's wrong? It's all about perception. Let me offer you up a bit of perspective. The only reason Apple managed to rise from the ashes and become one of the single most powerful forces in technology is because they understood the concept of perception. They re-invented th
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    Jack Wallen ponders the problem with the ever-lagging acceptance of the Linux desktop and poses a radical solution.
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Q4OS Is the Perfect Distro for People Who Want a Windows OS, Only Safer - Gallery - Sof... - 1 views

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    "There are many ways to make a Linux system look like its Windows counterpart. It's usually done with the help of themes and icons, and most of the times the resemblance is uncanny, but it's still not all that far away from the original base."
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    "There are many ways to make a Linux system look like its Windows counterpart. It's usually done with the help of themes and icons, and most of the times the resemblance is uncanny, but it's still not all that far away from the original base."
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