Skip to main content

Home/ Future of Museums/ Group items matching "access" in title, tags, annotations or url

Group items matching
in title, tags, annotations or url

Sort By: Relevance | Date Filter: All | Bookmarks | Topics Simple Middle
Ileana Maestas

Making Sense with Paul Solman | PBS NewsHour | PBS - 0 views

  •  
    Writer Michael J Sandel's book "What Money Shouldn't Buy" speaks to the growing "marketization" of our society. He asks strong moral questions about paying for access to fundamental parts of our society like equal representation. In this interview he does not address the marketization of arts or culture but I can see some of the warning signs he brings up. Is access to museums up for sale?
Karen Wade

Center for the Future of Museums: Robots for Accessibility: Help Henry Spread the Word - 0 views

  •  
    Increased accessibility through robotics to museums and countless other places is no longer a dream of the future, it's a reality in many large institutions. The challenge now is to translate these advances for use by the masses.
Karen Wade

Cognitive Disability | National Center on Accessible Instructional Materials - 0 views

  •  
    This overview focuses on accessible instructional materials, but also includes a good breakdown of various types of cognitive disabilities.
Karen Wade

Physical Disability | National Center on Accessible Instructional Materials - 0 views

  •  
    Discussion of accessible instructional materials for people with physical disabilities--includes a good breakdown of types of mobility impairments. There also are links to pages concerning various forms of sensory disabilities.
Ruth Cuadra

In the future you will own nothing and have access to everything - 1 views

  •  
    Sign me up! I'm ready to own nothing and have access to everything. Are you?
Ariane Karakalos

The Cost of "Free": Admission Fees at American Art Museums - 0 views

  • Museum theorists such as Elaine Heumann Gurian point out that admission fees may be the single biggest obstacle preventing museums from fulfilling their missions as educational institutions that are open and accessible to the widest range of visitors from all income levels and backgrounds. But is the financial position of most art museums so precarious that the 5 percent of operating budget provided by admissions fees is indispensable to the survival of the institution? Is there a middle ground between free admission and a standard entrance fee?
  • Potential visitors—especially families with children—are often concerned about the financial costs associated with a museum visit, such as transportation, parking and lunch. As the costs have risen, visitors expect greater value for their admission dollars.
  • Many of us have visited museums and seen the words “suggested donation” or “recommended amount” next to the admission fees. The actual amount collected per visitor is often significantly lower than the suggested amount
  • ...13 more annotations...
  • he Art Institute of Chicago switched from free Tuesdays to free Thursday evenings, from 5-8 p.m.
  • At the time of this writing, there is not much more than anecdotal evidence available on the desired result of racially and ethnically diverse visitors during free evening hours, but the Art Institute of Chicago has every reason to believe its change in free hours achieved this. “We had Chicagoans in the museum who reported that it was their first-ever visit,” Lee said. “We had parents telling us that they were grateful that the free hours allowed them to easily bring their children after work. We had more visitors per free hour than we did when the free hours were on Tuesdays.
  • the competing priorities of ideology, practicality and economics. By designating periods of free admission to attract the infrequent visitor, museums can more easily justify charging an entrance fee on a regular basis
  • Cool Culture, an inventive nonprofit formed in 1999, has created a family pass to 71 cultural institutions in New York City. The pass is intended for low-income families, and the program’s primary clients are Head Start and other subsidized child-care centers. Two-thirds of participants have household incomes below the federal poverty line.
  • Although transportation is not provided, participants can visit at any time and return as many times as they wish.
  • Cool Culture’s success is in the numbers: Families who have the Cool Culture Pass are four times more likely to visit a museum than families without the pass, according to Linda Steele, executive director.    
  • one might logically conclude that museums with no admission fee will attract larger audiences and thus have a better chance at earning more revenue within the museum: more visitors, more sales in shops or restaurants. Upon closer scrutiny, this assumption may not be true.
  • museum visitors who did not pay an admission fee were likely to spend even less on additional goods or services than the average visitor who paid a fee to enter, even they were not museum members.
  • responses from museums of various sizes, settings and budgets. The most commonly mentioned benefits of free admission were service to the community and accessibility to a more diverse audience. Increased exposure, attendance and public relations opportunities also ranked high, as did improved opportunities for individual, corporate and foundation support. The primary drawbacks were lost revenue and the inability to build a membership base. Security concerns also figured prominently.
  • Do Not Touch” signs in art exhibitions. Of the 15 responding museums that offered limited free admission days or hours, more than half reported a significant difference in visitor demographics: seniors, large family groups, school groups, disabled persons and drug or alcohol recovery groups were most likely to attend at these times. Museums in Seattle, Scottsdale, San Diego and the San Francisco Bay area all reported an increase in student visitors on free admission days. Sue Cake, a longtime docent at the Oakland Museum of California, observed that free admission days enabled teachers to assign a museum visit as part of a class lesson, likely a factor for increased student visitation at many museums.
  • can discount or waive admission fees on a case-by-case basis. “The experience should have value like a movie, going out to eat, a concert or any other leisure-time activity,” said Deputy Director Amy Oppio. “It is . . . important for guests to believe in supporting the organization and its mission.” 
  • Not all respondents shared Oppio’s view. One of the survey questions asked about the ideal admission fee structure. Of the 24 museums that responded to this question, 30 percent said that free admission is the way to go. Midge Bowman, executive director of the Frye Art Museum, responded that art museums “should be free as public libraries are. Without this open admission, they remain elitist institutions.”
  • ents we write and the act of imposing an entry fee,” she wrote. “Museums, if they remain oriented toward their paying customers will not . . . feel motivated to become essential elements within the community and an important educational resource for all individuals wishing to learn.”
Megan Conn

Indoor navigation system for blind - 0 views

  •  
    Making indoor spaces (like Museums?) more accessible to the blind.  
Karen Wade

Museum of New Hampshire History Apologizes To Abby Duffy, Blind Girl, For Taking Her Cane - 0 views

  •  
    Museums need to have more than policies regarding access, they need to train (and train thoroughly) both paid and volunteer staff. This story makes me cringe, but I also am not overly surprised. Let's just make sure a similar incident doesn't occur at our institutions!
Karen Wade

Museum 2.0: Museum 2.0 Rerun: I Am An Elitist Jerk - 1 views

  •  
    If you haven't seen Nina's blog this week, it's a "must read!" It's an important reminder that there are many different types of museum visitors out there, and while we should all provide access for a diversity of audiences, we don't want to forget those elitist jerks (especially since you and I may fall into that category more often than we'd like to admit).
Ruth Cuadra

Linking libraries, museums, archives | Harvard Gazette - 1 views

  •  
    Integration is happening on the technical side to provide seamless access to information no matter what format or under whose domain it might fall. Can integration be achieved -- or should it -- among the audiences of these different but related types of institutions/collections?
Ariane Karakalos

The future museum and the future school at newlearningonline - 0 views

  • A team of researchers across Europe is conducting an experiment to bring the museum into the school using virtual reality technology.
  • CONNECT project
  • The CONNECT project team believes that by linking the classroom with science centres, museums, planetariums and observatories, it can marry the best elements of formal curricula with informal learning.
  • ...4 more annotations...
  • Heads covered by virtual-reality visors,
  • link four science centres with participating classrooms in each country.
  • demanding technical challenges. A museum needs a series of access points around the various exhibits, for example, so students can really ‘visit’ the museum instead of watching a series of presentations. ‘In some museums that’s easy because there are high ceilings to fix the access points, in others it’s quite a challenge,’ explains Sotiriou …
  • In its software, CONNECT has produced a stunning virtual museum, featuring colourful, exciting graphics that allow a student to try experiments and then view the results. This advanced learning environment is called the CONNECT Virtual Science Thematic Park –
Ruth Cuadra

iMedicine - The Health & Wellbeing Issue - Curve - 0 views

  •  
    Increasingly people will have access to data about their lifestyles that will shape their behavior Issues of health and wellness will be seen less as an interruption into everyday life and instead a normal part of it
Ruth Cuadra

How the 'creative class' is re-making the world | SmartPlanet - 1 views

  •  
    $100/month membership-based workshops filled with otherwise inaccessible and often hugely expensive machinery, such as CNC mills, 3D printers and laser cutters. populated by people whose skills in computed-aided design and access to new materials is changing the world of manufacturing Perhaps, as has been suggested, the greatest opportunity for small scale manufacturing is in the developing world. But can Tech Shop be replicated in regions that aren't flush with people who have sizable disposable incomes?
Ruth Cuadra

The Open Office Opens Its Doors in Coventry Village - Shaker Heights, OH Patch - 1 views

  •  
    This kind of "third space" is really a workplace that is not home and not a coffee shop.  Alternative workspaces that draw people out of the homes and give them more and better access to workplace amenities can help people be more productive and create community.
Ruth Cuadra

Zócalo Public Square :: Human Life Was Partly Inevitable - 0 views

  •  
    combat people's fear of science by telling stories of discovery-human stories of people taking chances and making mistakes, persisting over time and getting lucky. A story of discovery transforms the conversation: making it accessible, human, and harder to argue with.
Ileana Maestas

Food Stamps Accepted by Local a Farmers' Market Vendo | The Daily Meal - 0 views

  •  
    I loved this article because it showed how the local food movement is working hard to be accessible to a lower income demographic.  
1 - 20 of 51 Next › Last »
Showing 20 items per page