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Harry Keller

You Can't Afford Apple's Education Revolution - 3 views

Apple is picking low-hanging fruit, as usual, and making a nice profit at the same time. Will they remain an isolated provider of online texts for iPads at high prices, or will they move to expand...

Apple future of education iPad economy scale

Bonnie Sutton

A Brief Future of Computing - 0 views

Dr Francis Wray looks back over the history of HPC and gives his insight into what can be said about systems in the future. Introduction Over the past 30 years, computing has come to play a signi...

University of Edinborough Dr. Francis Wray HPC History computing supercomputing

started by Bonnie Sutton on 22 Feb 12 no follow-up yet
Bonnie Sutton

12 Education Tech Trends to Watch in 2012 - 2 views

12 Education Tech Trends to Watch in 2012 FILED UNDER: Culture, Learning Methods, Tech Tools http://mindshift.kqed.org/2012/01/12-education-tech-trends-to-watch-in-2012/ Looking ahead a...

Education Tech Trends educational ideas for the future

started by Bonnie Sutton on 05 Jan 12 no follow-up yet
Claude Almansi

Changing Demographics of Tablet and eReader Owners in the US | Nielsen Wire - 0 views

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    "August 25, 2011 In the U.S., as recently as last Summer, tablet and eReader owners tended to be male and on the younger side. But according to Nielsen's latest, quarterly survey of mobile connected device owners, this is no longer the case. Back in Q3 2010, for example, 62 percent of tablet owners were under the age of 34 and only 10 percent were over the age of 55. By Q2 2011, only 46 percent of tablet owners were under the age of 34 and the percentage of those over 55 had increased to 19 percent. Looking at the data by gender underlines key changes in the eReader category. Sixty-one percent of all eReader owners are now female, compared to a mere 46 percent in Q3 2010. (Smartphone owners are now evenly split between male and female and data remain primarily male.)"
Bonnie Sutton

Why Tablets in the Classroom Could Save Schools $3 Billion a Year - 1 views

Why Tablets in the Classroom Could Save Schools $3 Billion a Year Submitted: March 29, 2012 - 4:08pm Originally published: March 29, 2012 Last updated: March 29, 2012 - 5:58pm Source: Wall Street J...

in the classroom saving money with tablets mobile data plan Publishers meeting on

started by Bonnie Sutton on 03 Apr 12 no follow-up yet
Bonnie Sutton

Ignore the Potential of Mobile Learning, Risk Widening the Digital Divide - 2 views

July 22, 2011 | 11:48 AM | By Tina Barseghian DIGITAL DIVIDE FILED UNDER: Learning Methods, digital media, digital-divide, mobile-learning http://mindshift.kqed.org/2011/07/ignore-the-...

Learning Methods digital media digital-divide mobile-learning

started by Bonnie Sutton on 23 Jul 11 no follow-up yet
Bonnie Sutton

The Years Worst Tech Trends.. - 1 views

http://www.slate.com/articles/technology/technology/2011/12/the_year_s_worst_tech_trend_complexity_.html 011 Was a Terrible Year for Tech All our devices got more complicated. And they won't get si...

complexity Terrible year for tech ecosystem devices and services transitional

started by Bonnie Sutton on 01 Jan 12 no follow-up yet
Jim Shimabukuro

Rupert Murdoch uses eG8 to talk up net's power to transform education | Media | guardian.co.uk - 6 views

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    "Rupert Murdoch uses eG8 to talk up net's power to transform education News Corp chairman claims 'Victorian' schools are 'last holdout from digital revolution' Kim Willsher in Paris guardian.co.uk, Tuesday 24 May 2011 18.10 BST Rupert Murdoch, the News Corporation founder and chairman, used his address to the eG8 Forum in Paris on Tuesday to call for more investment in education and "unlocking the potential" of the world's children. Murdoch said it was not a question of putting a computer in every school, but concentrating on opening up opportunities for youngsters to flourish by using targeted and tailored software. News Corp moved into the $500bn (£310bn) US education sector in late 2010, paying about $360m in cash for 90% of technology company Wireless Generation, which provides mobile and web software to enable teachers to use data to assess student progress and deliver personalised learning."
  • ...5 more comments...
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    From Harry Keller
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    Interesting contrast with Murdoch's attitude in 2009 - see http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2009/nov/09/murdoch-google - but is it really a contrast?
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    We've had Ely Broad, Bill Gates, and a host of other billionaires (even George Lucas) attempting to "fix" our education system. They're not doing so well. What is so interesting to me about Murdoch, despite his pirate-like business practices, is that he sees what I think is the real direction for the future of education. Oddly unlike his right-wing colleagues, he's not pushing for vouchers or more school privatization. Unlike the technocrats, he's not pushing for more and more computers in schools. He sees the solution to our schooling problems as "targeted and tailored software." Many (maybe most) countries, including the U.S., lack the political will as societies to fix education the way that Finland did. Software is the other path. Much discussion today centers around the platform. Will we use smart phones or e-tablets or netbooks? Will we see $1 apiece apps as the learning modules or cloud-based solutions? Will our new learning software run on iOS or Android? All of that is window dressing and barely worthy of discussion. For me, Murdoch hit the nail on the head. We have too little software "targeted and tailored" to education or, at least, too little highly professional quality software.
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    Errh yes about Murdoch pushing "targeted and tailored software" , Harry. But see also: "News Corp moved into the $500bn (£310bn) US education sector in late 2010, paying about $360m in cash for 90% of technology company Wireless Generation, which provides mobile and web software to enable teachers to use data to assess student progress and deliver personalised learning." So he is doing at software level what Microsoft etc were doing at hardware - and at times software - level: promoting his wares in a very juicy market. We've had "targeted and tailored to education" software for decades, now: LMSs, addons to office suites, etc. Some good, some bad. The problem with software that is targeted and tailored to education is that it is a) often boring; b) perforce based on an abstract general idea of education; c) often remote from what gets used outside school. Would it not be better to train teachers in adapting whatever software is generally available, be it desktop or on the cloud, to fit their and their specific students' needs?
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    My point is simply that Murdoch gets it. His motives don't have to be pure for us all to benefit from the light he's shining on educational technology. Regarding the software, your points are well-taken. However, one extra qualification must be added. The software must be "good." That means it must avoid the problems you list.
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    "Would it not be better to train teachers in adapting whatever software is generally available, be it desktop or on the cloud, to fit their and their specific students' needs?' I disagree with this analysis. Software not created for educational purposes will only adapt so far. It is, for example, word processing substituting for paper and pencil. That's worthy of doing but really makes no difference in instruction. When software is created specifically for learning, it can reach much more deeply into the learning processes. It's not just peripheral but central to learning. You can adapt lots of software to education in lots of ways, and I've read of many very clever adaptations. Almost all could be done without the use of a computer, albeit somewhat less efficiently but nonetheless effectively. I read Murdoch's call, which echoes something I've been saying for many years, as meaning that we have to build software that answers the necessities of learning. We don't have much today.
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    Taking up your example of word processing as substitute for pen and pencil , Harry: true, and that's what I retorted in the late 1990's to a digitalophobe academic, when we met about the Italian translation of one of his books, and he boasted of having got a letter from a publisher saying he was their last author to deliver typescripts on paper and not as a digital file. I pointed out that cut and paste, copy and paste (the things he particularly hated the ease of in digital media) existed in the real world looooooong before computers, let alone PCs, let alone the Web. And yet... in 2007 I was asked to set up at very short notice an intensive preliminary French workshop for participants in a master course in intercultural studies: though in Lugano, the course was to be in French and English. I asked for access to the Moodle for the course, to store course materials there etc. The organizers refused: "The Moodle will only be explained to the students in the first week of the course proper". The idea that graduate students needed to have a Moodle explained to them in 2007 seemed peregrine, but rather than arguing, I set up a for-free wiki instead. At our first meeting, the students asked why we weren't using the Moodle, I repeated the official explanation, they laughed and got the hang of the wiki immediately. Then, for reading comprehension, they chose one of the assigned texts for the course: a longish book chapter they had received by e-mail as a grayish PDF based on a low-resolution scan, based on a reduced photocopy to make 2 pages fit on an A4 sheet: i.e. with no margin to take notes on. So we printed the PDF, separated the pages with scissors, pasted the separate pages with glue sticks on new A4 sheets, to get wider margins to write in. And then we made a wiki page for it, copied in it the subheadings, between which the students, added the notes they were taking, working in groups on the new paper version. Result: http://micusif.wikispaces.com/Vinsonneau
Bonnie Sutton

The Great Tech War - 1 views

http://www.fastcompany.com/magazine/160/tech-wars-2012-amazon-apple-google-facebook?partner=homepage_newsletter ilbert Wong, the mayor of Cupertino, California, calls his city council to order. "...

tech wars google apple Facebook you tube Larry Page

started by Bonnie Sutton on 18 Oct 11 no follow-up yet
Bonnie Sutton

As digital divide widens, many can't afford access to information New study reports tha... - 3 views

As digital divide widens, many can't afford access to information New study reports that 38 % of lower-income parents don't know what an app is http://www.myfoxspokane.com/news/kcpq-app-gap-separa...

app gap the library internet printers and data research low income parents digital divide

started by Bonnie Sutton on 27 Oct 11 no follow-up yet
Vanessa Vaile liked it
Bonnie Sutton

Digital Differences - 1 views

Digital differences http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2012/Digital-differences/Overview.aspx?utm_source=Mailing+List&utm_campaign=ff253f2b2e-Newsletter_04262012&utm_medium=email When t...

Pew Report digital differences latino black and white use landline cell phone

started by Bonnie Sutton on 26 Apr 12 no follow-up yet
Bonnie Sutton

A New Yorker travels South (by Southwest) - 1 views

A New Yorker travels South (by Southwest) http://thedailyirv.com/?p=65 I made my first trip to South by Southwest (SXSW ) this week and I enjoyed it. If you have any doubt about the innovative spi...

25 billion downloads Apple applications Apps Store arqball Austin Borglar broadband Highlight hotspots human innovation mobile NewsiT red bull Space Dog Books start up village sxsw WeVideo zamp

started by Bonnie Sutton on 16 Mar 12 no follow-up yet
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