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Martin Burrett

Evidence of changes to children's brain rhythms following 'brain training' - 0 views

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    New research questions the strong claims that have been made about the benefits of 'research training' - enhanced mental skills, a boost to education, improved clinical outcomes and sharper everyday functioning. This new study found evidence that 'research training' changed research signalling but no indication of other benefits...
Dean Mantz

50 Brain Facts Every Educator Should Know | Associate Degree - Facts and Information - 30 views

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    Facts about the human brain that will help with education.
Martin Burrett

Brains of children with a better physical fitness possess a greater volume of grey matter - 0 views

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    "Researchers from the University of Granada (UGR) have proven, for the first time in history, that physical fitness in children may affect their Research structure, which in turn may have an influence on their academic performance. More specifically, the Researchers have confirmed that physical fitness in children (especially aerobic capacity and motor ability) is associated with a greater volume of grey matter in several cortical and subcortical Research regions."
Maggie Verster

What educators can learn from brain brain - 1 views

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    Who would have thought??? ;-) The brain can still learn new concepts after various ages, and that every student can be taught many different ways. In a sense, the brain can be rewired.
Emily Vickery

Brain Rules: 12 Principles for Surviving and Thriving at Work, Home, and School | Brain Rules | - 1 views

  • The brain is an amazing thing. Most of us have no idea what’s really going on inside our heads. Yet brain scientists have uncovered details every business leader, parent, and teacher should know.
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    Great website for application to learning.
Dave Truss

Your Brain on Computers - Attached to Technology and Paying a Price - NYTimes.com - 9 views

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    While many people say multitasking makes them more productive, research shows otherwise. Heavy multitaskers actually have more trouble focusing and shutting out irrelevant information, scientists say, and they experience more stress. And scientists are discovering that even after the multitasking ends, fractured thinking and lack of focus persist. In other words, this is also your research off computers. "The technology is rewiring our researchs,"
Jeff Johnson

BBC NEWS | Health | Sleeping soundly 'boosts memory' - 0 views

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    Researchers found sleep appears to have a dramatic impact on the way the Research functions the next day. It appears to strengthen connections between nerve cells in the Research - a process key to both learning and memory.
Dave Truss

Brain Power - Studying Young Minds, and How to Teach Them - Series - NYTimes.com - 10 views

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    *Need a free NYT account. For much of the last century, educators and many scientists believed that children could not learn math at all before the age of five, that their brains simply were not ready. But recent brain has turned that assumption on its head - that, and a host of other conventional wisdom about geometry, reading, language and self-control in class.
Martin Burrett

Positive Attitude Toward Maths Predicts Maths Achievement in Children - 1 views

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    "For the first time, scientists have identified the brain pathway that links a positive attitude toward maths to achievement in the subject. In a study of elementary school students, brainers at the Stanford University School of Medicine found that having a positive attitude about maths was connected to the better function of the hippocampus, an important memory centre in the brain, during the performance of arithmetic problems. The findings will be published online Jan. 24 in Psychological Science."
Martin Burrett

The Great Brain Experiment - 8 views

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    This is a fun Android and Apple app from University College London were players complete a range of games to exercise the brain cells and provide brainers with real, but anonymous data to use in their study. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/Science
Sandy Kendell

Brain Science and Cognitive Neuroscience for Children and Teachers - 10 views

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    Links to resources for neuoroscience research and its implications for education.
Martin Burrett

Research: Children see words and faces differently from adults - 1 views

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    "Young children literally see words and faces differently from adults. Where adults can most easily comprehend a word when they look at it straight on, children need to look a bit up and to the left. For faces, they need to look a bit up and to the right. What's more, those differences are accompanied by previously undetected changes in the brain circuits responsible for processing words and faces, brainers report Feb. 23 in Nature Communications."
Ed Webb

Mind - Research Upends Traditional Thinking on Study Habits - NYTimes.com - 3 views

  • instead of sticking to one study location, simply alternating the room where a person studies improves retention. So does studying distinct but related skills or concepts in one sitting, rather than focusing intensely on a single thing. “We have known these principles for some time, and it’s intriguing that schools don’t pick them up, or that people don’t learn them by trial and error,” said Robert A. Bjork, a psychologist at the University of California, Los Angeles. “Instead, we walk around with all sorts of unexamined beliefs about what works that are mistaken.”
  • The brain makes subtle associations between what it is studying and the background sensations it has at the time, the authors say, regardless of whether those perceptions are conscious. It colors the terms of the Versailles Treaty with the wasted fluorescent glow of the dorm study room, say; or the elements of the Marshall Plan with the jade-curtain shade of the willow tree in the backyard. Forcing the brain to make multiple associations with the same material may, in effect, give that information more neural scaffolding.
  • Cognitive scientists do not deny that honest-to-goodness cramming can lead to a better grade on a given exam. But hurriedly jam-packing a brain is akin to speed-packing a cheap suitcase, as most students quickly learn — it holds its new load for a while, then most everything falls out. “With many students, it’s not like they can’t remember the material” when they move to a more advanced class, said Henry L. Roediger III, a psychologist at Washington University in St. Louis. “It’s like they’ve never seen it before.”
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  • cognitive scientists see testing itself — or practice tests and quizzes — as a powerful tool of learning, rather than merely assessment. The process of retrieving an idea is not like pulling a book from a shelf; it seems to fundamentally alter the way the information is subsequently stored, making it far more accessible in the future.
  • An hour of study tonight, an hour on the weekend, another session a week from now: such so-called spacing improves later recall, without requiring students to put in more overall study effort or pay more attention, dozens of studies have found.
  • “The idea is that forgetting is the friend of learning,” said Dr. Kornell. “When you forget something, it allows you to relearn, and do so effectively, the next time you see it.”
  • “Testing not only measures knowledge but changes it,” he says — and, happily, in the direction of more certainty, not less.
  • “Testing has such bad connotation; people think of standardized testing or teaching to the test,” Dr. Roediger said. “Maybe we need to call it something else, but this is one of the most powerful learning tools we have.”
  • The harder it is to remember something, the harder it is to later forget. This effect, which researchers call “desirable difficulty,”
Vicki Davis

How Sheryl Sandberg's Last Minute Addition To Her TED Talk Sparked A Movement - 7 views

  • stories make up at least 65% of the content of the most successful TED presentations.
  • Most leaders who make pitches and presentations take the opposite approach, filling their content with mind-numbing and unemotional statistics and data. But as another popular TED speaker, Brené Brown, has noted, “Stories are just data with a soul.”
  • Science has also shown that stories connect us in extraordinary ways. Researchers at Princeton University have found that a remarkable thing happens to your mind when you hear a story. Personal stories actually cause the Researchs of both storyteller and listener to exhibit what the Researchers call “Research to Research coupling.” To put it simply, telling personal stories will put you in sync with your listener.
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    Successful TED talks are 60% stories but, as this example shows with Sheryl Sandberg, it can mean being vulnerable and sharing the personal side of yourself.
Martin Burrett

Storytime a 'turbocharger' for a child's brain - 1 views

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    "Storytime: While reading to children has many benefits, simply speaking the words aloud may not be enough to improve cognitive development in preschoolers. A new international study, published in the journal PLOS ONE and led by researchers at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, shows that engaging with children while reading books to them gives their research a cognitive "boost.""
Vicki Davis

Distracted to Learn? | Psych Central News - 6 views

  • It was as if those who were denied the same degree of distraction during testing as they experienced during learning suffered a disadvantage.
  • In the end it didn’t seem to matter what the distraction was during recall as long as subjects had had a distraction during learning. Everybody who had been distracted in both learning and recall performed better than those who were distracted while learning but undistracted during recall.
  • There just had to be the same degree of distraction at both times.
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  • Another task is to figure out what might be going on in the brain to allow divided attention to be a boost for recall, rather than a hindrance for learning
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    Surprising new research may rewrite learning theory as Brown University scientists contend that distractions do not necessarily impede the learning process of a motor task. Investigators discovered that if attention was as divided during recall of a motor task as it was during learning the task, people performed as if there were no distractions at either stage. Thus, the real issue is that inconsistent distraction can impair our recollection of the task. As long as our attention is as divided when we have to recall a motor skill as it was when we learned it, we'll do just fine, say the researchers.
Martin Burrett

Bilingual children learn other languages easier - 2 views

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    "It is often claimed that people who are bilingual are better than monolinguals at learning languages. Now, the first study to examine bilingual and monolingual brains as they learn an additional language offers new evidence that supports this hypothesis, brainers say. The study, conducted at Georgetown University Medical Center and published in the journal Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, suggests that early bilingualism helps with learning languages later in life."
Vicki Davis

The Tiny Differences in the Littlest Brains ~ Stephen's Web ~ by Stephen Downes - 8 views

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    New book reviewed by Stephen Downes about gender differences in brains.
Jackie Gerstein

Tucson Schools Enhance Learning with the Arts | Edutopia - 0 views

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    Brain-based Brain supports an effort to improve student achievement through an interdisciplinary curriculum that combines creative pursuits and academic subjects.
Maggie Verster

Social websites harm children's brains: Chilling warning to parents from top neuroscientist | Mail Online - 0 views

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    Alarmist article? Research evidence?
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