Skip to main content

Home/ educators/ Group items tagged teachers

Rss Feed Group items tagged

Maggie Verster

Teacher Tips/Training:Classroom management, lesson planning, discipline, professional d... - 0 views

  •  
    Looking for ideas and strategies about classroom management, lesson planning or discipline? This topic is full of professional development resources.
Jenny Gilbert

Teachers' TV Australia - 1 views

  •  
    aussie Teachers TV and Video channel -
Jeff Johnson

Technology | Change.gov: The Obama-Biden Transition Team - 0 views

  •  
    "Let us be the generation that reshapes our economy to compete in the digital age. Let's set high standards for our schools and give them the resources they need to succeed. Let's recruit a new army of teachers, and give them better pay and more support in exchange for more accountability. Let's make college more affordable, and let's invest in scientific research, and let's lay down broadband lines through the heart of inner cities and rural towns all across America."
Maggie Verster

Key Competancies- what it means for teachers and schools - 0 views

  •  
    The NZ Key Competencies - What this means for teachers and for schools
Fred Delventhal

Welcome! | Teachers Connecting - 0 views

  •  
    This website is a virtual convener. It facilitates a 'handshake' between teachers interested in cross collaboration project. The comforts in connectivity, constructivism, and collaboration make this 'handshake' more intelligent. This virtual convener is based on connecting teachers using more than simply the grade level or location of classrooms.
Dean Mantz

Scholastic Videos - 0 views

  •  
    Video and activity resources for educators from Scholastic.
Terry Elliott

World Without Walls: Learning Well with Others | Edutopia - 0 views

  • We must also expand our ability to think critically about the deluge of information now being produced by millions of amateur authors without traditional editors and researchers as gatekeepers. In fact, we need to rely on trusted members of our personal networks to help sift through the sea of stuff, locating and sharing with us the most relevant, interesting, useful bits. And we have to work together to organize it all, as long-held taxonomies of knowledge give way to a highly personalized information environment.
    • Jeff Richardson
       
      Good reason for teaching dig citizenship
    • Terry Elliott
       
      What Will suggests here is rising complexity, but for this to succeed we don't need to fight our genetic heritage. Put yourself on the Serengeti plains, a hunter-gatherer searching for food. You are thinking critically about a deluge of data coming through your senses (modern folk discount this idea, but any time in jobs that require observation in the 'wild' (farming comes to mind) will disabuse you rather quickly that the natural world is providing a clear channel.) You are not only relying upon your own 'amateur' abilities but those of your family and extended family to filter the noise of the world to get to the signal. This tribe is the original collaborative model and if we do not try to push too hard against this still controlling 'mean gene' then we will as a matter of course become a nation of collaborative learning tribes.
  • Collaboration in these times requires our students to be able to seek out and connect with learning partners, in the process perhaps navigating cultures, time zones, and technologies. It requires that they have a vetting process for those they come into contact with: Who is this person? What are her passions? What are her credentials? What can I learn from her?
    • Terry Elliott
       
      Aye, aye, captain. This is the classic problem of identity and authenticity. Can I trust this person on all the levels that are important for this particular collaboration? A hidden assumption here is that students have a passion themselves to learn something from these learning partners. What will be doing in this collaboration nation to value the ebb and flow of these learners' interests? How will we handle the idiosyncratic needs of the child who one moment wants to be J.K.Rowling and the next Madonna. Or both? What are the unintended consequences of creating an truly collaborative nation? Do we know? Would this be a 'worse' world for the corporations who seek our dollars and our workers? Probably. It might subvert the corporation while at the same moment create a new body of corporate cooperation. Isn't it pretty to think so.
  • Likewise, we must make sure that others can locate and vet us.
  • ...9 more annotations...
  • technical know-how is not enough. We must also be adept at negotiating, planning, and nurturing the conversation with others we may know little about -- not to mention maintaining a healthy balance between our face-to-face and virtual lives (another dance for which kids sorely need coaching).
    • Terry Elliott
       
      All of these skills are technical know how. We differentiate between hard and soft skills when we should be showing how they are all of a piece. I am so far from being an adequate coach on all of these matters it appalls me. I feel like the teacher who is one day ahead of his students and fears any question that skips ahead to chapters I have not read yet.
  • The Collaboration Age comes with challenges that often cause concern and fear. How do we manage our digital footprints, or our identities, in a world where we are a Google search away from both partners and predators? What are the ethics of co-creation when the nuances of copyright and intellectual property become grayer each day? When connecting and publishing are so easy, and so much of what we see is amateurish and inane, how do we ensure that what we create with others is of high quality?
    • Terry Elliott
       
      Partners and predators? OK, let's not in any way go down this road. This is the road our mainstream media has trod to our great disadvantage as citizens. These are not co-equal. Human brains are not naturally probablistic computer. We read about a single instance of internet predation and we equate it with all the instances of non-predation. We all have zero tolerance policies against guns in the school, yet our chances of being injured by those guns are fewer than a lightning strike. We cannot ever have this collaborative universe if we insist on a zero probability of predation. That is why, for good and ill, schools will never cross that frontier. It is in our genes. "Better safe than sorry" vs. "Risks may be our safeties in disguise."
  • Students are growing networks without us, writing Harry Potter narratives together at FanFiction.net, or trading skateboarding videos on YouTube. At school, we disconnect them not only from the technology but also from their passion and those who share it.
  • The complexities of editing information online cannot be sequestered and taught in a six-week unit. This has to be the way we do our work each day.
  • The process of collaboration begins with our willingness to share our work and our passions publicly -- a frontier that traditional schools have rarely crossed.
  • Look no further than Wikipedia to see the potential; say what you will of its veracity, no one can deny that it represents the incredible potential of working with others online for a common purpose.
  • The technologies we block in their classrooms flourish in their bedrooms
  • Anyone with a passion for something can connect to others with that same passion -- and begin to co-create and colearn the same way many of our students already do.
  • I believe that is what educators must do now. We must engage with these new technologies and their potential to expand our own understanding and methods in this vastly different landscape. We must know for ourselves how to create, grow, and navigate these collaborative spaces in safe, effective, and ethical ways. And we must be able to model those shifts for our students and counsel them effectively when they run across problems with these tools.
  •  
    Article by Wil Richardson on Collaboration
Maggie Verster

4Teachers : Tools for assessment - 0 views

  •  
    Expand your curriculum with our timesaving educational resources that use technology to improve instruction across all content areas and grade levels. Find current resources that align with standards, promote higher-order thinking, and support the development of writing skills. Monitor student research and writing, evaluate student performance, and create bilingual online lessons, classroom calendars, and quizzes in less time than traditional methods
Fred Delventhal

Once Upon a Tide - Free DVD for Teachers - 0 views

  •  
    Free DVD
Fred Delventhal

Podcast directory for educators, schools and colleges - 0 views

  •  
    In our podcast directory, you can freely access a variety of educational content from over 5000 podcasts from different podcast channels, including a range of audio, enhanced and video channels to illustrate examples of "educational podcasting" to support effective teaching and learning in schools, colleges and universities.
Fred Delventhal

Wordie - 0 views

  •  
    Wordie lets you make lists of words and phrases. Words you love, words you hate, words on a given topic, whatever. Lists are visible to everyone but can be added to by just you, a group of friends, or anyone, as you wish.
Dennis OConnor

Write or Die : Dr Wicked's Writing Lab - 0 views

  •  
    Write or Die is a web application that encourages writing by punishing the tendency to avoid writing. Start typing in the box. As long as you keep typing, you're fine, but once you stop typing, you have a grace period of a certain number of seconds and then there are consequences.
  •  
    Clever thinking, interesting writing tools, a kick in the pants for any writer wrestling with fluency.
Fred Delventhal

Interactive Whiteboard Resources - 0 views

  •  
    To get started pick a subject, then an age group from the menu on the left.

    We've been working hard to feature the best educational resources which work well on interactive whiteboards in the classroom. The resources are organised by subject, age group and category to make them easy for you to find. We are constantly updating the web sites listed here to ensure that they are current.
Maggie Verster

What Type of Teacher Are You - Teacher Personality Quiz - 0 views

  •  
    What is your Teacher Personality?
Fred Delventhal

Exploratorium | Evidence | How Do We Know What We Know? | Human Origins - 0 views

  •  
    For most of us, science arrives in our lives packaged neatly as fact. But how did it get that way?

    Science is an active process of observation and investigation. The Evidence Project examines that process, revealing the ways in which ideas and information become knowledge and understanding.

    a case study in human origins

    In this case study on human origins, we explore how scientific evidence is being used to shape our current understanding of ourselves: What makes us human-and how did we get this way?
Angela Maiers

100+ Open Courseware Resources for Teachers | Eduk8 - 0 views

  •  
    With so many open courseware resources available, this list should help you narrow your search to find exactly what you want. From educational theories, science and math, special education, technology, podcasts, and more.
  •  
    Open Courseware Resources
« First ‹ Previous 241 - 260 of 293 Next › Last »
Showing 20 items per page