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Toni Olivieri-Barton

Aviary - Powering the World's Creativity - 8 views

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    Xavier showed this to me years ago, but I wanted to bookmark it anyway.
David Hilton

E-learning - Online Tools and Applications on Go2Web20 - 14 views

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    Compilation of e-learning web 2.0 tools. 
Vicki Davis

WorldWide Telescope - 7 views

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    Microsoft's free worldwide telescope. The coolest thing about this is the planetariums that people build with it.
David Wetzel

Integrating Technology into Project Based Learning - 20 views

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    "Integration of technology is an integral part of project based learning, because technology is an integral part of life outside the classroom as revealed in this part of the definition - "types of learning and work people do in the everyday world outside the classroom.""
Ted Sakshaug

MAKE BELIEFS COMIX! Online Educational Comic Generator for Kids of All Ages - 1 views

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    Make your own comics quick and easy
Kathy Benson

Prezi - The Zooming Presentation Editor - 4 views

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    Prezi allows anyone who can sketch an idea on a napkin to create and perform stunning non-linear presentations with relations, zooming into details, and adjusting to the time left without the need to skip slides.
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    Prezi is the zooming presentation editor
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    just watched a presentation on prezi. a new take on an old(er) tool. nifty.
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    Presentations in the cloud
Dave Truss

The Power of Educational Technology: Advice for Web 2.0 Newbies - 0 views

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    Excellent post on advice to Web2.0 Newbies
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    Angela Maiers, in her latest blog post, asked for some suggestions for people starting their Web 2.0 journeys. Here are a just a few: 1. Start with the pedagogy -
Dave Truss

Share More! Wiki » Work/Build Your Own Personal Learning Network? - 0 views

  • If you fail to connect to the network of learners, you miss out on a global conversation about what you are passionate about. And missing out is a darn shame because it can save you time, energy, and increase your reach, no matter how brilliant (or not) you are. That’s a powerful idea. Smart people get smarter because they have access to the network of learners. People who are just starting out are able to learn as fast as they can to accomplish what they need to do. When I meet folks who are just becoming aware of the global conversation — usually because I push them over the edge in a workshop — I like to share several tools with them.
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    If you fail to connect to the network of learners, you miss out on a global conversation about what you are passionate about.
Barbara Barreda

ArtRage 2 - 0 views

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    The starter version is free and it is pretty easy to use allows you to save and print pictures. A tablet or drawing table is not required. I got some nice results just with my notebook mouse pad.
Deb Henkes

Home | JOG THE WEB - 0 views

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    Website will permit you to create a tutorial for displaying the websites you like or how to explore. It will even display notes on different pages that you may have left for future reference.
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    JogTheWeb is a simple, ergonomic solution which allows you to create, read and share a new online media: the WebBOOK; the necessary tool to providing real turnpage briefs or binders including both personal input and dynamic pages from the web.
Vicki Davis

Studyrails - 0 views

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    Website to help students study and get organized. Sends email and cell phone reminders.
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    Another new website to help students study. It says that it helps students get organize and overcome procrastination! MIght be worth the trial to learn their tricks! ;-) They have a 14 day trial. Sends email and cell phone reminders and "blocks distractions" (Not sure how.)
Eloise Pasteur

digitalresearchtools / FrontPage - 0 views

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    Wiki of Digital Research Tools
Eloise Pasteur

Doing Digital Scholarship: Presentation at Digital Humanities 2008 « Digital ... - 0 views

  • My session, which explored the meaning and significance of “digital humanities,” also featured rich, engaging presentations by Edward Vanhoutte on the history of humanities computing and John Walsh on comparing alchemy and digital humanities.
  • I wondered: What is digital scholarship, anyway?  What does it take to produce digital scholarship? What kind of digital resources and tools are available to support it? To what extent do these resources and tools enable us to do research more productively and creatively? What new questions do these tools and resources enable us to ask? What’s challenging about producing digital scholarship? What happens when scholars share research openly through blogs, institutional repositories, & other means?
  • I decided to investigate these questions by remixing my 2002 dissertation as a work of digital scholarship.  Now I’ll acknowledge that my study is not exactly scientific—there is a rather subjective sample of one.  However, I figured, somewhat pragmatically, that the best way for me to understand what digital scholars face was to do the work myself. 
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  • The ACLS Commission on Cyberinfrastructure’s report points to five manifestations of digital scholarship: collection building, tools to support collection building, tools to support analysis, using tools and collections to produce “new intellectual products,” and authoring tools. 
  • Tara McPherson, the editor of Vectors, offered her own “Typology of Digital Humanities”: •    The Computing Humanities: focused on building tools, infrastructure, standards and collections, e.g. The Blake Archive •    The Blogging Humanities: networked, peer-to-peer, e.g. crooked timber •    The Multimodal Humanities: “bring together databases, scholarly tools, networked writing, and peer-to-peer commentary while also leveraging the potential of the visual and aural media that so dominate contemporary life,” e.g. Vectors
  • My initial diagram of digital scholarship pictured single-headed arrows linking different approaches to digital scholarship; my revised diagram looks more like spaghetti, with arrows going all over the place.  Theories inform collection building; the process of blogging helps to shape an argument; how a scholar wants to communicate an idea influences what tools are selected and how they are used.
  • I looked at 5 categories: archival resources as well as primary and secondary books and journals.   I found that with the exception of archival materials, over 90% of the materials I cited in my bibliography are in a digital format.  However, only about 83% of primary resources and 37% of the secondary materials are available as full text.  If you want to do use text analysis tools on 19th century American novels or 20th century articles from major humanities journals, you’re in luck, but the other stuff is trickier because of copyright constraints.
  • I found that there were some scanning errors with Google Books, but not as many as I expected. I wished that Google Books provided full text rather than PDF files of its public domain content, as do Open Content Alliance and Making of America (and EAF, if you just download the HTML).  I had to convert Google’s PDF files to Adobe Tagged Text XML and got disappointing results.  The OCR quality for Open Content Alliance was better, but words were not joined across line breaks, reducing accuracy.  With multi-volume works, neither Open Content Alliance nor Google Books provided very good metadata.
  • To make it easier for researchers to discover relevant tools, I teamed up with 5 other librarians to launch the Digital Research Tools, or DiRT, wiki at the end of May.
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    Review of digital humanities scholarship tools
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