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Jeff Bernstein

Florida Officials Defend Racial and Ethnic Learning Goals - NYTimes.com - 0 views

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    "When the Florida Board of Education voted this month to set different goals for student achievement in reading and math by race and ethnicity, among other guidelines, the move was widely criticized as discriminatory and harmful to blacks and Hispanics.

    But the state, which has been required to categorize achievement by racial, ethnic and other groups to the federal government for more than 10 years, intends to stand by its new strategic plan. Education officials say the targets, set for 2018, have been largely misunderstood."
Jeff Bernstein

A Rotting Apple: Education Redlining in New York City | The Schott Foundation for Publi... - 0 views

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    In New York City public schools, a student's educational outcomes and opportunity to learn are statistically more determined by where he or she lives than their abilities, according to A Rotting Apple: Education Redlining in New York City, released by the Schott Foundation for Public Education.

    Primarily because of New York City policies and practices that result in an inequitable distribution of educational resources and intensify the impact of poverty, children who are poor, Black and Hispanic have far less of an opportunity to learn the skills needed to succeed on state and federal assessments. They are also much less likely to have an opportunity to be identified for Gifted and Talented programs, to attend selective high schools or to obtain diplomas qualifying them for college or a good job. High-performing schools, on the other hand, tend to be located in economically advantaged areas.
Jeff Bernstein

NYC Public School Parents: Nightline on test prep & the gifted exams: more "choices" fo... - 0 views

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    The results of the Gifted and Talented exams are in, and according to the NY Times, more than half of the children tested in wealthier districts like District 2 and District 3 were found to be "gifted", while only six children made the grade in District 7 in the South Bronx.  Why the disparity?

    Are these tests merely a way of sorting children by race and class, as Debbie Meier pointed out in 2007, when Klein first proposed to base all admissions to gifted programs on the basis of high stakes exams, or do the results really reflect children's inherent abilities?  And does the proliferation of G and T programs across the city help or hinder the goal of equity and systemic reform?
Jeff Bernstein

Conn. Schools Face Test - WSJ.com - 0 views

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    When Trailblazers Academy opened in 1999, the charter school was hailed for taking in low-achieving students that the city's traditional public schools ignored.

    Now, with the school's charter up for renewal in May, its unusual model is being scrutinized. State test scores at Trailblazers and its sister high school, Stamford Academy, are among the lowest in Connecticut, and community leaders are concerned about its large concentration of minority students.

    "I applaud them for giving underrepresented and underserved children extra services, but I do question why they have to be done in a segregated organization," said Wendy Lecker, the former president of the Stamford Parent Teacher Council.
Jeff Bernstein

The uneven playing field of school choice: Evidence from New Zealand - Ladd - 2001 - Jo... - 0 views

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    New Zealand's 10-year experience with self-governing schools operating in a competitive environment provides new insights into school choice initiatives now being hotly debated in the United States with limited evidence. This article examines how New Zealand's system of parental choice of schools played out in that country's three major urban areas with particular emphasis on the sorting of students by ethnic and socioeconomic status. The analysis documents that schools with large initial proportions of minorities (Maori and Pacific Island students in the New Zealand context) were at a clear disadvantage in the educational market place relative to other schools and that the effect was to generate a system in which gaps between the "successful" and the "unsuccessful" schools became wider.
Jeff Bernstein

Poverty Matters!: Questions Needing Answers pt. 2 | Dailycensored.com - 0 views

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    I want to be brief, but I think it is time that the "No Excuses" Reform movement answer some questions that simmer beneath their claims of "no excuses" and "poverty is not destiny." I want to move past the data and to why that data exist, and it is in the why that what claims the "No Excuses" Reformers are making become clear.
Jeff Bernstein

License to Experiment on Low Income & Minority Children? « School Finance 101 - 0 views

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    John Mooney at NJ Spotlight provided a reasonable overview of the NJDOE waiver proposal to "reward" successful schools and sanction and/or takeover "failing" ones.
    The NJDOE waiver proposal includes explanation of a new classification system for identifying which schools should be subject to state intervention, ultimately to be managed by regional offices throughout the state. This new targeted intervention system classifies districts in need of intervention as "priority" districts, with specific emphasis on "focus" districts.
Jeff Bernstein

Communities of Color and Public School Reform - 0 views

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    In today's knowledge‐based economy, education-especially education beyond high school-is central to achieving the American Dream. Yet, recent research points to devastating statistics related to educational outcomes in the nation's communities of color.  For example, only 54 percent of Native American students will graduate high school on‐time. Half of today's African American and Latino eighth‐graders will drop out of high school before graduation. And, only 10 percent of African‐American and Latino eighth grade students will complete any sort of college degree. While Asian American student outcomes are seemingly high compared to other students of color, this is not true for all Asian groups. Within the Southeast Asian community, 34 percent of Laotian, 39 percent of Cambodian, and 40 percent of Hmong adults do not have a high school diploma or equivalent.
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