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Materials for Faculty: Methods: Diagnosing and Responding to Student Writing - 11 views

  • For these reasons, instructors are continuously looking for ways to respond efficiently to student work. Seasoned instructors have developed systems that work well for them. We offer a few here: Don't comment on everything. Tell students that in your responses to a particular paper you intend to focus on their thesis sentences and introductions, or their overall structure, or their use of sources, etc. This method works particularly well in courses that require students to do several papers. Instructors can, as the term progresses, focus on different aspects of student writing. Space or stagger deadlines so that you are not overwhelmed by drafts. If the thought of grading eighteen essays in two or three days is daunting, divide the class in half or into thirds and require different due dates for different groups. Use peer groups. Ask students to meet outside of class (or virtually, on the Blackboard discussion board) to talk with one another about their papers. Peer groups work best when you've modeled the critiquing process in class, and when you provide students with models or guidelines for critiquing. See our page on Collaborative Learning for a fuller discussion. Ask for a Writing Assistant. The Writing Assistant reviews drafts of papers and makes extensive comments. students benefit by having an additional reader; instructors benefit because they get better papers. If you'd like more information about using a Writing Assistant in your course, contact Stephanie Boone, Director of Student Writing Support.
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    Don't comment on everything. Tell students that in your responses to a particular paper you intend to focus on their thesis sentences and introductions, or their overall structure, or their use of sources, etc. This method works particularly well in courses that require students to do several papers. Instructors can, as the term progresses, focus on different aspects of student writing. Space or stagger deadlines so that you are not overwhelmed by drafts. If the thought of grading eighteen essays in two or three days is daunting, divide the class in half or into thirds and require different due dates for different groups. Use peer groups. Ask students to meet outside of class (or virtually, on the Blackboard discussion board) to talk with one another about their papers. Peer groups work best when you've modeled the critiquing process in class, and when you provide students with models or guidelines for critiquing. See our page on Collaborative Learning for a fuller discussion. Ask for a Writing Assistant. The Writing Assistant reviews drafts of papers and makes extensive comments. students benefit by having an additional reader; instructors benefit because they get better papers. If you'd like more information about using a Writing Assistant in your course, contact Stephanie Boone, Director of Student Writing Support.
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Comic Creator - ReadWriteThink - 1 views

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    "The Comic Creator invites students to compose their own comic strips for a variety of contexts (prewriting, pre- and postreading activities, response to literature, and so on). The organizers focus on the key elements of comic strips by allowing students to choose backgrounds, characters, and props, as well as to compose related dialogue (shown at left). This versatile tool can be used by students from kindergarten through high school, for purposes ranging from learning to write dialogue to an in-depth study of a formerly neglected genre. The tool is easy to use, made even easier with the Comic Strip Planning Sheet, a printable PDF that comic creators can use to draft and revise their work before creating and printing their final comics. After completing their comic, students have the ability to print out and illustrate their final versions for feedback and assessment."
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Awesome Highlighter :Highlight and share in education ~ Educational Technology - 13 views

  • There are several ways educators can use Awesome Highlighter , here are some suggestions : Teachers can use it to show students the important parts of a lesson Teachers share links of Highlighted text of relevant interest with students to save them time students can use it to share referencing quotes between each other They can also use it to gather information for research and classroom project
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    "There are several ways educators can use Awesome Highlighter , here are some suggestions : * Teachers can use it to show students the important parts of a lesson * Teachers share links of Highlighted text of relevant interest with students to save them time * students can use it to share referencing quotes between each other * They can also use it to gather information for research and classroom project"
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Education Week Teacher: High-Tech Teaching in a Low-Tech Classroom - 6 views

  • How can we best use limited resources to support learning and familiarize students with technology?
  • get creative with lesson structure
  • Take advantage of any time that your students have access to a computer lab with multiple computers.
  • ...10 more annotations...
  • Relieve yourself from the pressure of knowing all the ins and outs of every tool. Instead, empower your students by challenging them to become experts who teach one another (and you!) how to use new programs.
  • "Pass it On" Buddy Method
  • Students assist one another in creating digital products that represent or reflect their new learning. It’s a great way to spread technological skills in a one-computer classroom.
  • Group Consensus Method
  • Small groups of students engage in dialogue on a particular topic, then a member uses a digital tool to report on the group's consensus.
  • Rotating Scribe Method
  • Each day, one student uses technology to record the lesson for other students.
  • Whole Class Method
  • Teachers in one-computer classrooms often invite large groups of students to gather around the computer. Here are a few suggestions for making the most of these activities
  • When we are faced with limited resources, it is tempting to throw up our hands and say, "I just don't have what I need to do this!" However, do not underestimate your ability to make it work.
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    Might help create a blended classroom, even when you have to share the blender.  Common sense advise for the real world of underequipped classrooms and stretched thin teachers.
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Community Club Home Listen and Read - Non-fiction Read Along Activities Scholastic - 3 views

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    From Richard Byrne Free Technology for teacher, quoted below:Listen and Read - Non-fiction Read Along Activities Listen and Read is a set of 54 non-fiction stories from Scholastic for K-2 students. The stories are feature pictures and short passages of text that students can read on their own or have read to them by each story's narrator. The collection of stories is divided into eight categories: social studies, science, plants and flowers, environmental stories, civics and government, animals, American history, and community. Applications for Education Listen and Read looks to be a great resource for social studies lessons and reading practice in general. At the end of each book there is a short review of the new words that students were introduced to in the book. students can hear these words pronounced as many times as they like. Listen and Read books worked on my computer and on my Android tablet. Scholastic implies that the books also work on iPads and IWBs"
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Back to School: 15 Essential Web Tools for Students - 2 views

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    The good news for students is that even though that means waking up early and doing homework, there are a number of web-based and social tools to help you get through the school year. From staying organized to improving study habits to making sure you reference your research sources properly, the web can help you be a better student.
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Kidblog.org - Blogs for Teachers and Students - 3 views

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    Kidblog.org is designed for elementary and middle school teachers who want to provide each student with their own, unique blog. Kidblog's simple, yet powerful tools allow students to publish posts and participate in discussions within a secure classroom blogging community. Teachers maintain complete control over student blogs.
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Free Technology for Teachers: StudyBlue - Collaborative Study Tools - 0 views

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    Study Blue is a website for students to share and collaborate on the creation of study tools. High School and college students can share notes from class, create multi-media flashcards, email, and share calendars using Study Blue. students can establish study groups or search for study groups already creating on Study Blue.
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Share More! Wiki | Anthology / Diigo the Web for Education - From TeleGatherer to TeleP... - 5 views

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    "# Supporting Diigo-based fine-grained discussions connected to a specific part of a webpage - which opens up the possibility for more meaningful exchanges where teachers can embed all kinds of scaffolding into web-based materials with Diigo: * sharing questions for discussion (either online, or to prepare students for an in-class discussion); * highlighting critical features; asking students to define words, terms, or concepts in their own words/language; providing definitions of difficult/new terms (in various media, such as embedding an image in the sticky note); * providing models of interpreting materials. * using the highlighting/sticky note feature to "mark up" our "textbook" (blog) with comments, observations and corrections to specific words, phrases or paragraphs of each post. * Aggregating bookmarks the students make of websites valuable to their learning, and use the highlighting feature and sticky notes as if they were like the Track Changes feature in MS Word which lends itself more towards collaboration and the iterative process. "
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'Teach Naked' Effort Strips Computers From Classrooms - Technology - The Chronicle of H... - 0 views

shared by Matthias Heil on 23 Jul 09 - Cached
  • Here's the kicker, though: The biggest resistance to Mr. Bowen's ideas has come from students, some of whom have groused about taking a more active role during those 50-minute class periods.
  • Introduce issues of debate within the discipline and get the students to weigh in based on the knowledge they have from those lecture podcasts, Mr. Bowen says.
  • "Strangely enough, the people who are most resistant to this model are the students, who are used to being spoon-fed material that is going to be quote unquote on the test," says Mr. Heffernan. "students have been socialized to view the educational process as essentially passive. The only way we're going to stop that is by radically refiguring the classroom in precisely the way José wants to do it."
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  • "inverted classroom."
  • 'I paid for a college education and you're not going to lecture?'"
  • PowerPoint is not the problem. It is how PPt is used.
    • Matthias Heil
       
      That's exactly the point. Of course we do need discussions in classrooms, but we also need to enable students to perform well in them, and here is where technology comes in: You can facilitate it in the learning process. - The headline of this article makes things far too easy...
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    I like how Bowen is questioning the use of tech for tech's sake. This further shows how it's not about the technology, but about the teaching.
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College Accept-tion to the Rule - NYTimes.com - 7 views

  • 1. WARM-UP/DO-NOW: In their journals, students respond to the following (written on the board prior to class): “Imagine that you are a college admissions counselor. What would you want to know about each of your potential applicants to decide whether or not you should accept them to your college? Create a list of questions.” students then share their responses. The teacher should write students’ questions on the board under the categories “Academics,” “Extracurricular,” “Career Goals,” “Talents,” “Personal Qualities,” and “Other.”
  • 3. Tell students that they will be writing letters to college admissions counselors to introduce themselves and to persuade the college to admit them. students refer to the categories and questions from the initial brainstorming exercise and answer each question for themselves. This procedure will serve as pre-writing for the actual letter.
  • –If you were a college admissions officer, what would you want to know about each of your potential applicants to decide whether or not you should accept them to your college?
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Evolving English Teacher: "How to Forge a Jane Austen Manuscript": Teaching Students Au... - 13 views

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    Glenda teaches us how to teach students to mimic one of the masters of prose-Jane Austen. Mimicry is often a great writing exercise for students who need to examine style.
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The World A.T. Ways » In which 10 Twitter applications might change your glob... - 0 views

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    ake a poll of your followers, i.e., your students. Let your students poll each other. This tool could help jumpstart a discussion on a topic.
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My Home - Practice speaking English while you watch great videos - EnglishCentral.com - 4 views

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    Wonderful video clips where students can record and practice their speaking. Good for improving literacy as well as English speaking skills. Any student who does not like reading aloud would enjoy! Latest: a clip from Despicable Me!
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On a Musical Note: Exploring Reading Strategies by Creating a Soundtrack - ReadWriteThink - 9 views

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    Students begin by analyzing how specific songs might fit with a familiar story. Students then create their own soundtracks for the movie version of a novel they have read. They select songs that match the text and fit specific events in the story.
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Students Know Good Teaching When They Get It, Survey Finds - NYTimes.com - 11 views

    • Leslie Healey
       
      we are teaching an added SAT review class to all juniors this year--there has been much consternation about the conflict between teaching to a test in SAT and our methods teaching lit and writing in the Brit Lit course.
  • One notable early finding, Ms. Phillips said, is that teachers who incessantly drill their students to prepare for standardized tests tend to have lower value-added learning gains than those who simply work their way methodically through the key concepts of literacy and mathematics. Teachers whose students agreed with the statement, “We spend a lot of time in this class practicing for the state test,” tended to make smaller gains on those exams than other teachers. “Teaching to the test makes your students do worse on the tests,” Ms. Phillips said. “It turns out all that ‘drill and kill’ isn’t helpful.”
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1 Week workshop: Easy Web 2.0 tools that you can use in your classroom - 14 views

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    "Over the course of this event we will be looking at a small range of web based tools that will enable you to create motivating online language learning activities for your students. These can be used either in class or set as homework. You will have the chance to understand how these tools work, find out how to use them with students and be able to try your hand at creating and sharing activities with other teachers. By the end of the event you should have a small 'toolkit' of resources and ideas that will enable you to enhance your lessons though the effective and pedagogically sound use of technology."
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Poems for High School Students - Poets.org - Poetry, Poems, Bios & More - 7 views

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    A good collection of poetry for high school students.
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