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Dennis OConnor

Top 6 Tips on Course Design from an Instructional Designer - 0 views

  • Old news: Make sure your learning objectives are clear and measurable, then make sure that your content and assessment align with your objectives. The current crop of eLearning tools are sensational and feature-laden, but don't lose sight of what's essential to a powerful training experience.
Dennis OConnor

ASCD Inservice: Why All Teachers Must Learn How to Teach Online - 0 views

  • International Association of K-12 Online Learning
  • Patrick says that public education has struggled to incorporate technology into schools and just adding computers piecemeal is not enough to engage students
  • If you have been sleep for the past ten years, you need to know that this is the future of education - online.
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  • Every person I know who can solve problems can read, write and think critically.
  • FIRST they must engage as an online learner, before they can be the teacher. Online learning is a different experience, but opens many doors of opportunity
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    Susan Patric from NACOL is a power hitter in K-12 virtual schooling. If this is your interest area, consider joining iNACOL. (The i = international)
Dennis OConnor

UW Stout's Ask5000 Self-Service Helpdesk - 0 views

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    login for telecom self service help. Open a ticket. Be sure to mention you are a distance learner.
Dennis OConnor

Browser Configuration | Desire2Learn@UWW - 0 views

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    The rubic's cube of browser/computer/lms problems... this might help
Dennis OConnor

Diigo Educator Account - FAQ - Diigo Help Center - 1 views

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    Here's the FAQ for Diigo Educator accounts. Diigo is working to make this kind of social bookmarking service k-12 friendly. Some good ideas and tools for teachers are explained here. Our UW-Stout Group is not a restricted educator group. We're working with the full online package.
Dennis OConnor

» Here's How I Built That PowerPoint E-Learning Template The Rapid eLearning ... - 0 views

  • ’ve gotten a lot of emails about the template I used in the Dump the Drone demo.  So I’m going to show you how I built it (all inside PowerPoint) and then I’ll show you some tricks that will make it easier for you to build your own elearning courses.
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    PowerPoint 2007 how to create stand alone e-learning objects with branching and choice. Linked to Articulate Presenter
Dennis OConnor

Here's How You Can Get Past Click & Read E-Learning - Articulate - Word of Mouth Blog - 0 views

  • In an earlier post, I showed you how to build scenarios using the branching and locking features in Presenter ‘09. It’s pretty easy to do. Once you get a handle on how to use those features, the question is, “How can I apply this to my elearning course?”
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    Articulate's presenter used as a way of creating stand alone e-learing scenarios. Good info on branching scenarios
Dennis OConnor

GlobalClassroom | Home - 0 views

  • Your online classroom is free; we have made it easy for teachers to connect with students using the Internet.
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    Moodle Based classroom setting for teachers...
Dennis OConnor

ASCD Inservice: The Curse of the Digitally Illiterate - 0 views

  • In his article in the February Educational Leadership ("Learning with Blogs and Wikis"), Bill Ferriter argues that digital tools like RSS feeds and aggregators help educators advance their professional learning. But first, some teachers need to join the ranks of the literate
  • Sadly, digital illiteracy is more common that you might think in schools. There are hundreds of teachers that haven't yet mastered the kinds of tools that have become a part of the fabric of learning—and life—for our students. We ban cell phones, prohibit text messaging, and block every Web application that our students fall in love with. We see gaming as a corrupting influence in the lives of children and remain convinced that Google is making us stupid. 
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    A solid and timely article about the professional responsibility all educators have to become digitally literate. The comments on this blog are particularly good. You get a real feel for what's happening in the trenches
Dennis OConnor

The Fischbowl: Is It Okay To Be A Technologically Illiterate Teacher? - 0 views

  • Here is my list:1. All educators must achieve a basic level of technological capability.2. People who do not meet the criterion of #1 should be embarrassed, not proud, to say so in public.3. We should finally drop the myth of digital natives and digital immigrants. Back in July 2006 I said in my blog, in the context of issuing guidance to parents about e-safety:"I'm sorry, but I don't go for all this digital natives and immigrants stuff when it comes to this: I don't know anything about the internal combustion engine, but I know it's pretty dangerous to wander about on the road, so I've learnt to handle myself safely when I need to get from one side of the road to the other."
  • 4. Headteachers and Principals who have staff who are technologically-illiterate should be held to account.5. School inspectors who are technologically illiterate should be encouraged to find alternative employment.6. Schools, Universities and Teacher training courses who turn out students who are technologically illiterate should have their right to a licence and/or funding questioned.7. We should stop being so nice. After all, we've got our qualifications and jobs, and we don't have the moral right to sit placidly on the sidelines whilst some educators are potentially jeopardising the chances of our youngsters.
  • If a teacher today is not technologically literate - and is unwilling to make the effort to learn more - it's equivalent to a teacher 30 years ago who didn't know how to read and write. Extreme? Maybe. Your thoughts?
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  • Keep in mind that was written after a particularly frustrating day. I’ve gone back and forth on this issue myself. At times completely agreeing with Terry (and myself above), and at other times stepping back and saying that there’s so much on teacher’s plates that it’s unrealistic to expect them to take this on as quickly as I’d like them to. But then I think of our students, and the fact that they don't much care how much is on our plates. As I've said before, this is the only four years these students will have at our high school - they can't wait for us to figure it out.
  • In order to teach it, we have to do it. How can we teach this to kids, how can we model it, if we aren’t literate ourselves? You need to experience this, you need to explore right along with your students. You need to experience the tools they’ll be using in the 21st century, developing your own networks in parallel with your students. You need to demonstrate continual learning, lifelong learning – for your students, or you will continue to teach your students how to be successful in an age that no longer exists
  • If a teacher today is not technologically literate - and is unwilling to make the effort to learn more - it's equivalent to a teacher 30 years ago who didn't know how to read and write.
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    I read this post several years ago and it got my blood moving. The author, Karl Fisch lays it on the line. This post was voted the most influential ed-blog post of 2007. It's 2009 already and still a very relevant piece of work. A must read!
Dennis OConnor

Geezers online and implications for schools - 0 views

  • While school leaders (rightly) focus on the importance of the Internet in students' lives and education, we ought to also seriously be considering what this report says about how we communicate with our parents and communities. And asking what exepectations we should have of all teachers of an online presence and use of digital communications.
  • Most of our parents fall smack into the Gen X category - that which has a disproportionately high percentage number of online users and is increasingly likely to look for information online.
  • Too often educators think of students as their "customers." Dangerous mistake. Children no more choose their  schools than they choose their physicians or shoe stores. Parents who wouldn't choose a bank that does not allow online account access won't choose a school that doesn't offer online gradebook access either.
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    From Doug Johnson's Blue Skunk Blog. Doug provides a link to the new Generations Online in 2009 report from the Pew Internet project. The chart of Generational Differences In Online Activities is an eye opener. (Since I have geezer eyeballs, the title of this post really appeals to me!)
Dennis OConnor

What is Moodle explained with Lego - 1 views

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    Very clever and clear slide show that illustrates what Moodle is and what it can do. Audience: educators / trainers interested in e-learning and online teaching.
Dennis OConnor

Webspiration: Online Visual Thinking Tool | myWebspiration - 2 views

  • Whether working individually or collaboratively, Webspiration is the new online visual thinking tool.
  • How much does it cost? Well, nothing! Webspiration is currently in Public Beta and offered free of charge. Learn more about what a Public Beta is and how Webspiration is using it to create an even better Visual Thinking Tool.
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    Free online version of Inspiration, the popular idea mapping tool.
Dennis OConnor

UW-Stout D2L Video Overview - 0 views

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    5 minute overview of the D2L interface at UW-Stout. Good way to start!
Dennis OConnor

YouTube - Diigo - Improving how we find, share, and save information - 0 views

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    solid conceptual overview
Dennis OConnor

Cheating Goes Digital | Edutopia - 2 views

  • In a 2006 poll conducted by the Josephson Institute's Report Card on the Ethics of American Youth, 60 percent of the 35,000 high school students polled admitted to cheating during a test at school within the past twelve months, and 35 percent of students said they'd cheated two or more times.
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    In a 2006 poll conducted by the Josephson Institute's Report Card on the Ethics of American Youth, 60 percent of the 35,000 high school students polled admitted to cheating during a test at school within the past twelve months, and 35 percent of students said they'd cheated two or more times.
Dennis OConnor

6 Quick Steps to Create a Game Based E-learning Course « One-Stop Resource fo... - 0 views

  • Using game concepts in learning will definitely engage and interest the learner. Instead of giving lectures and lessons on a subject, try presenting the subject as a problem or an activity to the learner and allow him to solve the problem or participate in the activity. Learning must happen as the learner tries to solve the problem or indulges in the activity.
Dennis OConnor

"Closing the Loop" - why I teach blended courses | The Sloan Consortium - 0 views

  • The blended sequence of events – from face-to-face to online, back to face-to-face again – is critical to the success of the module. Each of the steps is necessary to make the next possible. Further, the face-to-face and online activities have to be integrated to achieve the learning objectives of the module. Third, the students constitute themselves as a peer learning community both online and face-to-face, though in different ways, in response to my prompts. Finally, this learning module prepares the way for the next, since the topic we take up is the issue of spiritual autobiographies – how people become believers. I will use a similar thematic tension between our case study of Neopaganism and the personal religious beliefs of class members to encourage them to apply a standard anthropological model of religious conversion to their own circumstances.
  • I teach blended courses precisely because they give me the option to make the learning experience far more intense and engaging.
Dennis OConnor

Discussion Response Techniques & Netiquette | The Sloan Consortium - 2 views

  • Online discussion is the heart of a community of practice oriented e-learning course.
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    8 Discussion response techniques & 7 netiquette rules for online discussion.
Dennis OConnor

Diigo Tutorials - 0 views

  • Diigo Tutorials Last edited September 19, 2008 More by Cliotech - Jennifer Dorman »
  • #6: Hate photocopying and assembling bulky, wasteful handouts? Save time and money. Just tag the pages, including highlights and notes, you want to include, then quickly Extract all the information under that tag. Give students CDs containing copies of the HTML file which has links to all the original pages and includes highlighted passages and your notes, or print copies as you need them. Watch this demo to see how it's done.
  • #11: Whether you write a blog for colleagues or to keep your students infromed, Diigo offers several useful features. You can blog directly from the Diigo toolbar, with a link to the page you're writing about as well as your highlights and notes already added to the post. Diigo will also send a linkroll of resources you've saved directly to your blog with no extra effort on your part.
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    Jennifer Dorman's Google Notebook listing Diigo Tutorials. Jennifer if obviously deep into diigo and generously sharing her resources in the best web 2.0 tradition. Check out the list of twelve uses for diigo at the bottom of the page! (I'll highlight a few.)
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