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Elizabeth Checkalski

Is Online Learning Right for Me? - 0 views

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    Other than saving the planet, what are the advantages of an online course? 1. online courses are convenient. The biggest advantage of an online course is that your classroom and instructor (theoretically) are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Your only excuse for missing class is not getting online! Otherwise, everything is available to you. You can get announcements, access notes, review assignments, take practice quizzes, discuss questions, chat with fellow students and study any time you want. Other than certain due dates, you make your own schedule for completing the requirements of the course. 2. online courses offer flexibility. You can study any time you want. You can study with whomever you want. You can study wearing anything you want (or nothing if you prefer!) online courses give you the flexibility to spend time with work, family, friends, significant others or any other activity you like. You still have to complete the work (and this flexibility can be your downfall; see disadvantages) but for many people, with continually changing work schedules or people who make frequent business trips, parents with small children, students caring for others or whose health prevents them from making it to campus on a regular basis, students whose friends or boyfriend/girlfriend drop in unexpectedly, or for those days when the surf and/or snow is wicked, this method of course delivery can't be beat. 3. online courses bring education right to your home. online students often find that their family, friends and/or boy-girl-friends get involved in the course. Oftentimes, a student will study with that special someone present. Children may take an interest in the online environment. Parents may look over the shoulder of an online student while they are surfing across the web. In short, everyone in the household gets involved in learning. Having the support of your family and friends makes you
Dennis OConnor

YouTube - TravelinEdMan's Channel - 4 views

  • Among the topics in the video "Planning an Online Course", Dr. Bonk covers pedagogical and operational differences between on-site and Online courses, strategies for adapting a current course to an Online version, guidelines for creating, planning and designing a course and content.ResourcesIU Instructional Consulting office: http://www.indiana.edu/~icy/media/de_series.html General LinksPlanning an Online Course:http://www.edtec.unsw.edu.au/inter/dload/flex_ed/resource...Instructional Design Tips for Online Learning: http://www.csuchico.edu/tlp/resources/rubric/instructiona...Online Teaching Tips: http://www.Onlineteachingtips.org/Online vs. Onsite: http://www.nccei.org/blackboard/Onlinevsonsite.htmlTeacher-centered vs. Student-centered: http://www.telrepublic.com/?p=292Online Learner Characteristics: http://faculty.cccOnline.org/index.php?title=Online_Learn...IU-specific LinksInstructional Consulting: www.indiana.edu/~icyTeaching & Learning Technology Centers: http://www.indiana.edu/~tltc/IU Online & Distance Education: http://iuOnline.iu.edu/index.htmlIU Library Support for DE: http://www.libraries.iub.edu/?pageId=7156Comparing Traditional and Distance Teaching:http://php.indiana.edu/~appelman/DistanceTeaching.htmExample of Online MaterialOER Commons: http://www.oercommons.org/National Repository of Online Courses: http://www.montereyinstitute.org/nroc/ MERLOT: http://www.merlot.org/merlot/index.htmConnexions: http://cnx.org/ MIT OpenCourseWare: http://ocw.mit.edu/OcwWeb/web/home/home/index.htm ..
  • Among the topics in the video "Planning an Online Course", Dr. Bonk covers pedagogical and operational differences between on-site and Online courses, strategies for adapting a current course to an Online version, guidelines for creating, planning and designing a course and content.ResourcesIU Instructional Consulting office: http://www.indiana.edu/~icy/media/de_series.html General LinksPlanning an Online Course:http://www.edtec.unsw.edu.au/inter/dload/flex_ed/resource...Instructional Design Tips for Online Learning: http://www.csuchico.edu/tlp/resources/rubric/instructiona...Online Teaching Tips: http://www.Onlineteachingtips.org/Online vs. Onsite: http://www.nccei.org/blackboard/Onlinevsonsite.htmlTeacher-centered vs. Student-centered: http://www.telrepublic.com/?p=292Online Learner Characteristics: http://faculty.cccOnline.org/index.php?title=Online_Learn...IU-specific LinksInstructional Consulting: www.indiana.edu/~icyTeaching & Learning Technology Centers: http://www.indiana.edu/~tltc/IU Online & Distance Education: http://iuOnline.iu.edu/index.htmlIU Library Support for DE: http://www.libraries.iub.edu/?pageId=7156Comparing Traditional and Distance Teaching:http://php.indiana.edu/~appelman/DistanceTeaching.htmExample of Online MaterialOER Commons: http://www.oercommons.org/National Repository of Online Courses: http://www.montereyinstitute.org/nroc/ MERLOT: http://www.merlot.org/merlot/index.htmConnexions: http://cnx.org/ MIT OpenCourseWare: http://ocw.mit.edu/OcwWeb/web/home/home/index.htm ..
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    "Among the topics in the video "Planning an Online Course", Dr. Bonk covers pedagogical and operational differences between on-site and Online courses, strategies for adapting a current course to an Online version, guidelines for creating, planning and designing a course and content. Resources IU Instructional Consulting office: http://www.indiana.edu/~icy/media/de_series.html General Links Planning an Online Course: http://www.edtec.unsw.edu.au/inter/dload/flex_ed/resource... Instructional Design Tips for Online Learning: http://www.csuchico.edu/tlp/resources/rubric/instructiona... Online Teaching Tips: http://www.Onlineteachingtips.org/ Online vs. Onsite: http://www.nccei.org/blackboard/Onlinevsonsite.html Teacher-centered vs. Student-centered: http://www.telrepublic.com/?p=292 Online Learner Characteristics: http://faculty.cccOnline.org/index.php?title=Online_Learn... IU-specific Links Instructional Consulting: www.indiana.edu/~icy Teaching & Learning Technology Centers: http://www.indiana.edu/~tltc/ IU Online & Distance Education: http://iuOnline.iu.edu/index.html IU Library Support for DE: http://www.libraries.iub.edu/?pageId=7156 Comparing Traditional and Distance Teaching: http://php.indiana.edu/~appelman/DistanceTeaching.htm Example of Online Material OER Commons: http://www.oercommons.org/ National Repository of Online Courses: http://www.montereyinstitute.org/nroc/ MERLOT: http://www.merlot.org/merlot/index.htm Connexions: http://cnx.org/ MIT OpenCourseWare: http://ocw.mit.edu/OcwWeb/web/home/home/index.htm .."
Dennis OConnor

Views: Lessons of a Summer Teaching Online - Inside Higher Ed - 0 views

  • As I faithfully attended the monthly training meetings for Just in Time Technology (ex: how to use Skype) and for Course Design (ex: what is the conversion of 14 weeks pacing into a 30 day class), it began to dawn on me that I had underestimated the time and preparation required for my online course.
  • Reducing the amount of content does not mean reducing rigor for students or work for me. Like many others who have never taught online, I had entered this experience thinking that online courses were a little bit “fluffy.” I have a newfound respect for my fellow online professors.
  • Although I am a relative novice in the teaching arena, I appreciated the chance to revive my teaching mojo. I was forced to be creative about how to present course material and ensure that my students had a solid understanding of the information. I also realized I needed to revise my opinion of online teaching and those who participate in it. I now know that online courses are not a pale and lifeless version of traditional courses or worse, a “pay for an A” scam in which everyone teaches him/herself and everyone gets a good grade. online courses can be distinctive and worthwhile ways of teaching in their own right. Amy Overman is assistant professor of psychology at Elon University.
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    Reviewed by Nancy Chapko: n her article, Lessons of a Summer Teaching Online, Dr. Amy Overman describes how she revived her "teaching mojo" as a novice Online instructor. An assistant professor of psychology at Elon University in North Carolina, Dr. Overman describes her personal experience as a first-time Online instructor. Written for instructors who may have doubts about Online teaching and learning as she did, her account is both thoughtful and humorous. Dr. Overman describes her decision to teach an Online class and her preparation for the experience. She relates her somewhat unexpected positive experience facilitating the class. She offers comparisons between her face-to-face and Online teaching experiences and draws some insightful conclusions. Among them is the realization that reducing the amount of content does not reduce the rigor of the course and Online classes take a lot of time, but they're worth it. Whether you're a committed veteran of Online teaching, or you are at the initial stage of considering its merits, you will find Dr. Overman's article perceptive and thought-provoking. As she states, "… Online courses are not a pale and lifeless version of traditional courses."
Dennis OConnor

Online Learning (Rowman & Littlefield Education) - 3 views

  • "Online education programs at the high school, undergraduate, and graduate levels represent one of the fastest growing trends in education today. However, Online classes are completely different from any other educational endeavor and require a new set of skills. Bowman, who currently teaches Online undergraduate and graduate courses, and her fellow contributors provide an excellent down-to-earth guide for anyone who is thinking about or participating in an Online education program. This well-written and understandable book covers some theories of learning styles but focuses on the nuts-and-bolts skills needed to be successful. Each chapter explores a particular aspect of learning Online and gives practical advice about how to participate successfully in an Online learning environment. Verdict: Bowman and the other contributors have several years' experience helping students learn Online, and their perspectives make this a practical and helpful guide to a prevalent and growing practice."— June 2010, Library Journal Starred Review
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    I've known Leslie Bowman for over a decade. She's a great online teacher. Her book is filled with the wisdom of experience. Check it out! ~ Dennis "online education programs at the high school, undergraduate, and graduate levels represent one of the fastest growing trends in education today. However, online classes are completely different from any other educational endeavor and require a new set of skills. Bowman, who currently teaches online undergraduate and graduate courses, and her fellow contributors provide an excellent down-to-earth guide for anyone who is thinking about or participating in an online education program. This well-written and understandable book covers some theories of learning styles but focuses on the nuts-and-bolts skills needed to be successful. Each chapter explores a particular aspect of learning online and gives practical advice about how to participate successfully in an online learning environment. Verdict: Bowman and the other contributors have several years' experience helping students learn online, and their perspectives make this a practical and helpful guide to a prevalent and growing practice."- June 2010, Library Journal Starred Review "
Kate Grovergrys

Facilitating Every Student in an Online Course - 6 views

  • The trait categories discussed herein are: Time Management Skills Discipline and Motivation Synergy and the Online Learning Community Communication Skills Technophobia Access
  • Time Management Skills Independent of whether a course is self-paced, cohort-paced, or instructor-paced, time-management skills are a key to the success of an online student due to the nature of the online classroom
  • Discipline and Motivation Skills Unlike a face-to-face classroom, the distance student does not have an instructor on hand to recognize lack of motivation or to immediately prompt a student to participate.
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  • Synergy and the Online Learning Community Palloff and Pratt (8) and Stephen Covey (9) argue that while the power of the community is great, the power of the learning community is even greater. Shaffer and Anundsen (10) relate that there is an innate human yearning for a sense of belonging.
  • The table below summarizes possible solutions to different types of student disruption. As always, be prepared to provide personal contact via email if the situation is escalating or to make the student aware of your concern.
  • Communication Skills In the online community, virtually all communication is written, so it is essential that all students have the ability to properly express themselves in writing. However, the writing ability of online students often vary greatly.
  • Technophobia Many people have an aversion to computer use (or at least the modern connotation of a computer as a desktop processor with keyboard, monitor, and productivity software since even a calculator is technically a computer.) In many cases, this aversion will prohibit that person's ability to participate in an online course.
  • Disability Accessibility All online instructors should be make sure that their course materials are accessible to students with disabilities.
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    This is an "oldie but a goodie". Virgil Varvel details many common facilitation strategies and responses. Solid advice, common sense, a fine foundation reference.
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    In his article, "Facilitating Every Student in an Online Course," Virgil Varvel addresses the need for Online instructors to promote successful Online learning skills. He recognizes that not all Online students possess the skills that they need to be successful and advocates a pro-active approach. He identifies six traits that students need to succeed: 1) time management skills, 2) discipline and motivation, 3) a sense of community, 4) communication skills, 5) computer skills and 6) access. For each of these attributes, Varvel presents techniques that Online instructors can use to mentor the "non-ideal" learners. It is his assertion that instructors can ensure the success of all Online learners if they take care to design their course to account for varying abilities among students. The scope of this article is rather broad, but given the author's experience with post-secondary education, that seems to be the intended audience. Virgil Varvel is an experienced Online educator and is well-respected for his research in the area of distance education. The information he provides in this article is very important to me as an educator because so many of my students lack essential Online learning skills. His expertise in this area is inspiring.
Dennis OConnor

News: The Evidence on Online Education - Inside Higher Ed - 0 views

  • WASHINGTON -- Online learning has definite advantages over face-to-face instruction when it comes to teaching and learning, according to a new meta-analysis released Friday by the U.S. Department of Education.The study found that students who took all or part of their instruction Online performed better, on average, than those taking the same course through face-to-face instruction. Further, those who took "blended" courses -- those that combine elements of Online learning and face-to-face instruction -- appeared to do best of all. That finding could be significant as many colleges report that blended instruction is among the fastest-growing types of enrollment.
  • the positive results appeared consistent (and statistically significant) for all types of higher education, undergraduate and graduate, across a range of disciplines, the study said.
  • On the topic of online learning, there is a steady stream of studies, but many of them focus on limited issues or lack control groups. The Education Department report said that it had identified more than 1,000 empirical studies of online learning that were published from 1996 through July 2008. For its conclusions, however, the Education Department considered only a small number (51) of independent studies that met strict criteria. They had to contrast an online teaching experience to a face-to-face situation, measure student learning outcomes, use a "rigorous research design," and provide adequate information to calculate the differences.
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  • Using technology to give students "control of their interactions" has a positive effect on student learning, however. "Studies indicate that manipulations that trigger learner activity or learner reflection and self-monitoring of understanding are effective when students pursue online learning as individuals," the report says.
  • n noting caveats about the findings, the study returns to the issue of time."Despite what appears to be strong support for online learning applications, the studies in this meta-analysis do not demonstrate that online learning is superior as a medium," the report says. "In many of the studies showing an advantage for online learning, the online and classroom conditions differed in terms of time spent, curriculum and pedagogy. It was the combination of elements in the treatment conditions (which was likely to have included additional learning time and materials as well as additional opportunities for collaboration) that produced the observed learning advantages. At the same time, one should note that online learning is much more conducive to the expansion of learning time than is face-to-face instruction."
  • " What the study demonstrates, she said, is that colleges need to think broadly about using online education, and not be "artificially limited" to face-to-face instruction.
  • Successful education has always been about engaging students whether it is in an online environment, face to face or in a blended setting. And fundamental to that is having faculty who are fully supported and engaged in that process as well."
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    Timely information for our group! The learning time issue in particular is an important finding that points to a cost effective way to increase student learning time without tackling the issue of a longer school day head on. We know that more time on meaningful tasks is crucial, but the physical cost of attending a bricks and mortar classrooms is prohibitive.
Julie Council

The 10 Key Rules for Managing Time in Online Teaching - Faculty Focus | Faculty Focus - 1 views

  • Get into a schedule
  • Become ultraorganized. Whether you teach one online course or 10, staying organized is crucial. From the more traditional teacher’s planning book, notepads, and daily planners to the online daily reminders, class rosters, and various other course-ma
  • Become ultraorganized
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  • Become ultraorganized.
  • Become ultraorganized. Whether you teach one online course or 10, staying organized is crucial. From the more traditional teacher’s planning book, notepads, and daily planners to the online daily reminders, class rosters, and various other course-
  • Become ultraorganized. Whether you teach one online course or 10, staying organized is crucial. From the more traditional teacher’s planning book, notepads, and daily planners to the online daily reminders, class rosters, and
  • Become ultraorganized. Whether you teach one online course or 10, staying organized is crucial. From the more traditional teacher’s planning book, notepads, and daily planners to the online daily reminders, class rosters, and various other course-management tools, there is a huge selection of items to help you stay organized. Choose what
  • traditional teacher’s planning book, notepads, and daily planners to the online daily reminders, class rosters, and various other course-management tools, there is a huge selection of items to help you stay organized. Choose what works best for your personality
  • Always refresh your “teaching time zone
  • Become ultraorganized. Whether you teach one online course or 10, staying organized is crucial. From the more traditional teacher’s planning book, notepads, and daily planners to the online daily reminders, class rosters, and various other course-management tools, there is a huge selection of items to help you stay organized. Choose what works best for your personality
  • Become ultraorganized. Whether you teach one online course or 10, staying organized is crucial. From the more traditional teacher’s planning book, notepads, and daily planners to the online daily reminders, class rosters, and various other course-management tools, there is a huge selection of items to help you stay organized. Choose what works best for your personality,
  • best f
  • Know that the “unexpecteds” always come knocking. No matter how careful we are, n
  • Plan your assignments with time in mind
  • Don’t ever let time control you
  • your personality,
  • Focus on what has to be done
  • Develop health
Dennis OConnor

Best Practices in Online Teaching - 1 views

  • Summary: This course provides practical strategies and pedagogical advice for instructors teaching in an online environment. The course includes advice about: preparing to teach in an online environment, managing the teaching of a course, and addressing larger issues surrounding online teaching (e.g. workload, intellectual property, etc.) The course includes interviews from a number of teachers who have taught in an online environment. This course is based on a training session offered to faculty who teach at The World Campus at Penn State University.
  • This work is licensed by Larry Ragan under a Creative Commons Attribution License (CC-BY 2.0). Last edited by Cecelia Merkel on Aug 28, 2007 10:38 am GMT-5.
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    Larry Ragan of Pennsylvania's World Campus offers this in-depth introduction to the best practices of teaching online. College professors new to online teaching are the intended audience. Still there's plenty here to remind the seasoned professional about the importance of the basics. Ragan uses an 'on demand' presentation. You read at your own pace. There is no group interaction. The materials are presented under a created common's license. The content is first rate, the ideas clearly presented, and the academic citations are current and highly relevant to anyone interested in online teaching. For those without formal training who find themselves tasked with teaching online, this is a wonderful resource. For those who already teach online and are looking for a refresher, this is a course you'll want to visit.
Dennis OConnor

Growth Markets in Online Education - 3 views

  • Online program growth is particularly high in two-year institutions.
  • Markets for online learning have expanded rapidly; the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) reports that between 2002 and 2006 the number of students taking at least one online course grew from 1.1 million to 12.2 million - a significant increase! According to the Ambient Institute, the trend will continue and reach 22 million by 2011. Enrollment in online courses is rising at a faster rate than total enrollments in Higher Education. As of late 2006, according to the Sloan Consortium, nearly 3.48 million students in the U.S. were taking at least one online class. Moreover, the number of students who take all degree courses online is significantly increasing, while the number of students taking all courses via campus-based means is decreasing.
  • Significant growth in online learning is anticipated in the two-year community and junior college Higher Education segment.
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  • Currently, the overwhelming majority of the approximately 5-million online students in the U.S. — over 82 percent are undergraduates.
  •   Current trends toward a growing preference for online education are also fueled by the millennial generation, who learn in very different ways than have learners from previous generations.
  • Major population groupings that continue to offer high levels of growth opportunity in online education include: (a) K-12 courses, (b) international populations in Europe, Australia, India, and China, (c) adult professional degree programs, (d) military populations, (e) adult degree completion programs, and (f) populations by religion (e.g., Christian).
  • In summary, growth in online education has primarily been fueled by demand from non-traditional, adult learners for flexibility and convenience.
  • Future growth will continue through new generations of digital native students, led by the Millennials, who create demand for online education designed and developed in concert with Web 2.0 applications and technologies.
  • Characteristics such as a high level of motivation, self-discipline, self-regulation, self-efficacy, ICT literacy, and academic preparedness are directly associated with students who succeed in online learning.
Dennis OConnor

6 Questions to Ask When Choosing an Online Instructor | UCF Today - 7 views

  • With the growing amount of online colleges and courses to choose from, how can you make sure you don’t waste your time or money on a badly taught course? Some highly experienced online instructors and students suggest asking an instructor these six questions before signing up.
  • With the growing amount of online colleges and courses to choose from, how can you make sure you don’t waste your time or money on a badly taught course? Some highly experienced online instructors and students suggest asking an instructor these six questions before signing up.
  • With the growing amount of online colleges and courses to choose from, how can you make sure you don’t waste your time or money on a badly taught course? Some highly experienced online instructors and students suggest asking an instructor these six questions before signing up.
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  • With the growing amount of online colleges and courses to choose from, how can you make sure you don’t waste your time or money on a badly taught course? Some highly experienced online instructors and students suggest asking an instructor these six questions before signing up.
  • With the growing amount of online colleges and courses to choose from, how can you make sure you don’t waste your time or money on a badly taught course? Some highly experienced online instructors and students suggest asking an instructor these six questions before signing up
  • 1. Are you proficient at using a variety of software programs?
  • 2. How quickly do you respond to students’ E-mails?
  • 3. Do you utilize new technologies in the course?
  • she needs to meet them in person. 3. Do you utilize new technologies in the course?
  • With the growing amount of online colleges and courses to choose from, how can you make sure you don’t waste your time or money on a badly taught course? Some highly experienced online instructors and students suggest asking an instructor these six questions before signing up.
Carolyn Jenkins

The Future of Online Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: The Survey Says… (EDUCAUSE Quarterly) | EDUCAUSE - 0 views

    • Carolyn Jenkins
       
      Future of online teaching and learning = linking pedagogy, technology, and learner needs
  • Such responses indicate that respondents still see learning as content-driven, not based on social interactions and distributed intelligence. The emphasis remains on a knowledge-transmission approach to education, not one rich in peer feedback, online mentoring, or cognitive apprenticeship.
  • significant gap separated preferred and actual online instructional practices.
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  • Although some discussions in the literature relate to effective practices in the use of emerging technologies for online education, empirical evidence to support or refute the effectiveness of such technologies, or, perhaps more importantly, guidance on how to use such tools effectively based on empirical evidence, is lacking.
  • online survey
  • 42 questions grouped into three sections related to the current status and future trends of online education in higher educatio
  • 12,000 who received the e-mail request, 562 completed the surve
  • Again, the focus was on enhancing content and associated content delivery, not on the social interactions, cross-cultural exchanges, or new feedback channels that wider bandwidth could offer.
  • Given the demand for online learning, the plethora of online technologies to incorporate into teaching, the budgetary problems, and the opportunities for innovation, we argue that online learning environments are facing a "perfect e-storm," linking pedagogy, technology, and learner needs.2
  • Such responses indicate that higher education institutions might be wise to explore certificate and short-program offerings rather than full degree programs.
  • enhancing pedagogy is perhaps the most important factor in navigating the perfect e-storm
  • respondents said that training students to self-regulate their learning (22 percent) was needed most, followed by better measures of student readiness (17 percent), better evaluation of student achievement (17 percent), and better CMSs to track student learning. Nine percent said additional technology training is needed.
  • learning outcomes and pedagogical skills.
  • most important skills for an online instructor during the next few years will be how to moderate or facilitate learning and how to develop or plan for high-quality online courses (see Table 2).
  • online instructors are moderators or facilitators of student learning.26
  • findings also indicated that, in general, respondents envisioned the Web in the next few years more as a tool for virtual teaming or collaboration, critical thinking, and enhanced student engagement than as an opportunity for student idea generation and expression of creativity. This is not surprising, given that most instruction in higher education is focused on consumption and evaluation of knowledge, not on the generation of it.
  • Perhaps online training departments and units need to offer more examples of how to successfully embed creative and generative online tasks and activities.
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    Survey of on-line educators to learn what they think are the future on-line teaching and learning trends
Jen Pfeffer-Dittes

Teaching Strategies: Online Teaching - 5 views

  • Teaching Strategies: Online Teaching Online Course Design
  • The following resources provide guidelines for creating an online course, best practices for teaching online, and strategies for assessing the quality of online education.
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    Center for Research on Teaching and Learning, Here is a large collection of links to further reading in best practices for teaching online.
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    This web page is full of links from a variety of major universities. The links cover all areas of online teaching - from questioning, to instructional strategies, to best practice for online teaching. Great source for anyone looking to research effective online teaching.
Pinhopes Job Site

Online hiring challenges | Ways to tackle jobs | Pinhopes - 0 views

  •  
    Today employers face multiple challenges with traditional online hiring portals such as:

    ü  Escalating cost of accessing candidates database which is largely unused

    ü  Time-consuming candidate search and review process

    ü  Hard to zero-in on the right resource

    ü  Limited branding options

    Needless to say, all the above factors slow hiring online which delays bringing candidates on-board. To help employers tackle these online recruitment problems, Pinhopes - a new-age online hiring destination, has introduced innovative profile filtering features, video based online hiring process, multiple branding avenues combined with cost-effective payment option. Here are the key differentiators which help employers hire 3x faster:

    Get relevant applications from interested candidates - Every time

    Unlike existing online recruitment portals Pinhopes doesn't deal in database business which means employers are not required to search for right candidates, in a database which is largely unused. Instead employers get relevant applications directly from active job seekers for a job opening, without putting much effort.

    No tedious candidate search process - Advanced built-in search bubbles best ta
Dennis OConnor

The Essential Role of Information Fluency in E-Learning and Online Teaching | The Sloan Consortium - 1 views

  • Curiously, most educators think they are competent searchers and evaluators, when they are really just beginners. Their disposition is to ask for help rather than search for answers. With simple instruction many radically improve their ability to search, and evaluate. This is empowering and greatly increases learner satisfaction. Instruction in copyright and fair use is also part of the program.
  • As online teachers and learners we work in a computer where information is just a few keystrokes away.
  • I've been researching and writing about Information Fluency since the turn of the century. My work is published on the 21st Century Information Fluency Portal: http://21cif.imsa.edu You'll find modular online learning content including games, micromodules and assessments on the portal. (Free for all educators.) I include information fluency training in all of my online classes. I introduce power searching and website investigation to the graduate students studying in the E-Learning and online Teaching Certificate Program at UW-Stout ( http://www.uwstout.edu/soe/profdev/elearningcertificate.html ) because I believe that Information Fluency is a foundation skill for all online teachers and learners.
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    I've been researching and writing about Information Fluency since the turn of the century. My work is published on the 21st Century Information Fluency Portal: http://21cif.imsa.edu You'll find modular online learning content including games, micromodules and assessments on the portal. (Free for all educators.) I include information fluency training in all of my online classes. I introduce power searching and website investigation to the graduate students studying in the E-Learning and online Teaching Certificate Program at UW-Stout ( http://www.uwstout.edu/soe/profdev/elearningcertificate.html ) because I believe that Information Fluency is a foundation skill for all online teachers and learners.
Sheila Morris

iNACOL guide to on line learning - 1 views

  • The majority of content on this site is intended for program administrators — the people that are either investigating the possibility of creating an online learning program or have already been assigned this task. The site also contains useful information for policy makers — state legislators, staff members at the state department of education, and district administrators who wish to establish a positive policy environment for online learning.
  • This website was created as a public resource to meet a growing need for information on starting online education programs in the United States. The website is sponsored by the International Association for K-12 online Learning (iNACOL) and was developed by a project team of experts in the K-12 online education field.
  • About this Website This website was created as a public resource to meet a growing need for information on starting online education programs in the United States. The website is sponsored by the International Association for K-12 online Learning (iNACOL) and was developed by a project team of experts in the K-12 online education field. Your Guide to K-12 online Learning Starting an online program is a daunting task which often can be overwhelming. If you have come to t
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  • his web site, you probably already know this. The information and resources provided here have been compiled and organized to help you feel less overwhelmed.
  • The majority of content on this site is intended for program administrators — the people that are either investigating the possibility of creating an online learning program or have already been assigned this task. The site also contains useful information for policy makers — state legislators, staff members at the state department of education, and district administrators who wish to establish a positive policy environment for online learning.
  • here are many existing resources for K-12 online learning. For individuals who are just getting sta
  • rted with the process, the number of resources can be a challenge to navigate.
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    Starting your own online program. Advice annd resources from iNACOL
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    Resourse for schools that are looking to begin on line learning
Judy Barnicle

Illinois Online Network: Instructional Resources : Pointers and Clickers : Facilitating Every Student in an Online Course - 7 views

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    Every student in an online course is not going to be the "ideal" online learner. In this article Dr. Varvel gives several techniques for the online facilitator to use in order to accommodate all types of learners. Methods are given to address each of the six traits of online learners at any level. These traits include time management skills, discipline and motivation, the online learning community, communication skills, technophobia and access. The success of every online student is dependent on the instructor/facilitator designing and implementing the course to meet the needs of every student. While reading this article, I was able to identify students that are enrolled in my internship class. Dr. Varvel includes a chart of different types of students along with examples of proper instructor response to the different situations. This will come in very handy when constructing communications to my various students.
Ann Kenady

Illinois Online Network - 3 views

online faculty development; e-learning

started by Ann Kenady on 25 Jan 13 no follow-up yet
Nancy Woodward

Administrators' Views on Factors Influencing Full-Time Faculty Members' Participation in Online Education - 3 views

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    Lesht and Windes explored, through a survey administered at five universities/colleges in Illinois, the factors that motivate and deter faculty to participate in online teaching. The first motivating factor was survival. Many colleges find that if they are going to survive in today's economy, they need to institute online classes and faculty at the colleges find they need to teach them as part of their course load. Another factor is that students are demanding online and hybrid classes in order to meet their needs and faculty need to adjust to this demand to retain students. Other factors identified included stipends that are often added for teaching online, flexibility for the faculty, seeing peers that are enjoying/successful at teaching online and improvements in technology. Pedagogical factors that deter faculty from teaching online include the amount of time required to convert a class to online and uneasiness with technology. Perceptions that still remain also deterred faculty from teaching online classes. These include the perception that online classes are inferior to face-to-face classes and that online classes are not a "good fit" for the college. The final area that deters faculty is support. The needed technology support is not always available and this causes frustration for the faculty. Finally, the authors explored "disruptive innovation theory" as a factor that encourages faculty to teach online. These factors include things like the current economic environment, enrollment declines and the need for students to work while attending college. The authors concluded flexibility is the key to attracting and retaining students and faculty recognize this as important and therefore want to teach online to meet their students' needs.
Nina Levine

A Need for Humor in Online Courses - 0 views

  • A Need for Humor in Online Courses. by David James On every campus, the debate about the legitimacy of Online courses flourishes in academic hallways. One area of interest, student satisfaction, clearly indicates a general approval of Online technology. Most students state that they do more work Online than in traditional classes and that they would recommend Online courses to their friends (Presby 2001). In one survey of four hundred students from seventy-two Online classes, more than 90 percent said they would recommend Internet classes to friends. It is obvious that the "flexibility of time ... and place" of Online classes are their greatest assets (Goldsmith 2001, 2). The movement toward offering Online courses is a natural one given the gains in technology. Previous studies have shown enhanced learning in less time when computer-based instruction is included in traditional classes (Krueger 2000, 2). It is not a fantasy to assume that a similar result may occur with Online instruction. Yet even some experts claim that "there is still a lot we don't know about the best way to use these new tools for learning" (2). As colleges, universities, and schools move to offer more classes in the popular Online format, both teachers and students should be aware of what may be absent in class: the routine benefits of humor.For years, student surveys on the characteristics of the most effective teachers routinely have placed humor as one of the top five traits (Hart 1934; Murray 1983; Crump 1996). More recently, numerous studies have confirmed the significant role that humor plays in the learning process. The judicious use of content-related, nonhostile humor has been proven to1. create a more supportive learning environment (Ziv 1979; Gorham and Christophel 1990; Stuart and Rosenfeld 1994);2. enhance students' attention (Weaver, Bryant, and Zillmann 1988);3. enhance students' pleasure in learning and testing activities (Ziv, Gorenstein, and Moris 1986; Weaver and Cottrell 1988; Lorenzi 1996);4. increase the divergent thinking skills of students (Ziv 1979, 1983);5. increase the actual learning taking place, as defined by better final exam scores (Ziv 1988); and6. enhance students' attitudes toward the subject matter (James 1998).
  • Boynton made it clear that humor is crucial in her online courses. She admits that the humor must assume a different form than in face-to-face classes and that it takes extra effort to consciously make humor happen.
  • attempting to BE humorous takes more time than just being utilitarian."
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  • It's more planned, 'constructed,' and risky, but I cannot imagine teaching without it."
  • By necessity, online humor is a unique kind of humor, one that is much more linguistically oriented.
Dennis OConnor

Tom Vander Ark: How Digital Learning Will Change America - 4 views

  • Reflecting the internet's ability to cross municipal and state borders, virtual and blended school operators should have the ability to enroll students statewide. Only 18 states have authorized statewide virtual charter schools. Lagging states have been protecting districts from competition by denying statewide virtual charters or by providing only a fraction of typical funding with weak rationale. Susan Patrick from the International Association of K-12 Online Learning and I will encourage authorizers to lead the way in expanding high-quality options for students and families. Now that netbooks and tablets cost less than textbooks, it's time for schools and districts to embrace digital learning. It's time for more engagement, more time on task, more productivity. Our kids are Online, it's time their education was.
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    Online Teaching and Learning provide powerful opportunities to k-12 students. I'm all for QUALITY Online ed for this generation of school kids. Quality eduction, Online or face to face, requires well trained, articulate, and creative teachers. Recreating a bricks and mortar, read and test Online environment won't take us where we want to go (into the 21st century where critical thinking is essential). Hopefully some creative charters will help evolve k-12 Online education into the multifaceted and responsive learning environment that will work for kids... right now!
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