Skip to main content

Home/ E-Learning for Educators/ Contents contributed and discussions participated by cc omalley

Contents contributed and discussions participated by cc omalley

cc omalley

US DOE Evaluation of Evidence-based Practices - 2 views

  •  
    The article Evaluation of Evidence-Based Practices in Online Learning: A Meta-Analysis and Review of Online Learning Studies is a study undertaken at the behest of the U.S, Department of Education to evaluate online learning practices through a meta-analysis of research. It is intended for policy-makers, administrators and educators to use to make research based decisions on online learning and teacher preparation at the K-12 level. The original plan was to have it completed by 2008, but there were so few rigorous studies available that they waited until 2010 to include more. In a search of the literature from 1994-2008, only 5 studies were found of sufficient rigor to measure effectiveness of online learning in K-12 students. The remaining 43 studies were for older learners, with most content being from the medical or health care field. The lead author, Dr. Barbara Means, directs the Center for Technology in Learning at SRI International, an independent nonprofit research organization. Her focus is on the relationship between technology, education systems, and student learning. Four research questions were addressed: * How does the effectiveness of online learning compare with that of face-to-face instruction? * Does supplementing face-to-face instruction with online instruction enhance learning? * What practices are associated with more effective online learning? * What conditions influence the effectiveness of online learning? The findings that were most interesting to me were: * Guiding questions provided to discussion groups influence the way students interact, but not the amount they learn. * Learning is enhanced when students can manipulate media or reflect. * Videos do not influence learning more than assigning homework, unless students can manipulate them. * Online quizzes do not influence learning more than homework. * Explicitly taught self-reflection, self-regulation and self
cc omalley

Michigan uses online learning to reach at-risk students | Best Practices News | eSchool... - 0 views

  • Westwood Community School’s Cyber High School. This is a pilot program, operating under a state superintendent-approved seat time waiver, that employs a constructivist, online learning model patterned after the United Kingdom’s “Not School,” a research-based program designed expressly for re-engaging dropouts. Westwood students enroll full time as “researchers,” and they work with “mentors” and “experts” (i.e., certified and highly qualified teachers) to earn credit towards the Michigan Merit Curriculum graduation requirements by completing cross-curricular projects. Researchers work collaboratively and/or independently at their own speed in this year-round, 24-7 program. In addition to providing instruction that boasts a six-to-one ratio of students to teachers, Westwood provides researchers with computers, broadband connectivity, and access to in-person learning lab sessions.
  • Westwood Community School’s Cyber High School. This is a pilot program, operating under a state superintendent-approved seat time waiver, that employs a constructivist, online learning model patterned after the United Kingdom’s “Not School,” a research-based program designed expressly for re-engaging dropouts. Westwood students enroll full time as “researchers,” and they work with “mentors” and “experts” (i.e., certified and highly qualified teachers) to earn credit towards the Michigan Merit Curriculum graduation requirements by completing cross-curricular projects. Researchers work collaboratively and/or independently at their own speed in this year-round, 24-7 program. In addition to providing instruction that boasts a six-to-one ratio of students to teachers, Westwood provides researchers with computers, broadband connectivity, and access to in-person learning lab sessions.
  •  
    Westwood Community School's Cyber High School. This is a pilot program, operating under a state superintendent-approved seat time waiver, that employs a constructivist, online learning model patterned after the United Kingdom's "Not School," a research-based program designed expressly for re-engaging dropouts. Westwood students enroll full time as "researchers," and they work with "mentors" and "experts" (i.e., certified and highly qualified teachers) to earn credit towards the Michigan Merit Curriculum graduation requirements by completing cross-curricular projects. Researchers work collaboratively and/or independently at their own speed in this year-round, 24-7 program. In addition to providing instruction that boasts a six-to-one ratio of students to teachers, Westwood provides researchers with computers, broadband connectivity, and access to in-person learning lab sessions.
cc omalley

Inclusion Trust Home - 3 views

  •  
    We specialise in the reengagement and inclusion of disenfranchised, disaffected and marginalised learners of all ages through the effective use of innovative pedagogies and cutting edge technologies. All our work is founded in practitioner research.
cc omalley

Rubrics for Assessment Online Professional Development - UW Stout, Wisconsin's Polytech... - 6 views

  •  
    Rubrics for everything
cc omalley

Assessment Design and Cheating Risk in Online Instruction - 4 views

  •  
    TAcTICS TO DETER CHEATING using multiple versions of an exam randomizing question order and response order not using identical exam questions from previous semesters proctor vigiliance instructor led discussion of grade integrity and ethical conduct computer screen recessed under desktop instead of on top of desktop using a mix of short answer and multiple choice questions seating arrangements smaller room seating capacity high ratio of questions to minutes allowed
cc omalley

SmartSurvey.pdf (application/pdf Object) - 4 views

  •  
    How to create valid surveys that people will take
  •  
    Guidelines for creating valid surveys-will help in crating assessments
cc omalley

Alternative Learning Methods: Self-Paced Learning (Part 3 of 5) - 2 views

  • Self-paced or individualized learning is defined as learning directed by the individual in order to meet personal learning objectives.
  •  
    Self-paced or individualized learning is defined as learning directed by the individual in order to meet personal learning objectives.
  •  
    I'll use this as a guideline for constructing online activities
cc omalley

Copyright Law: From Digital Reprints to Downloads - ReadWriteThink - 3 views

  •  
    read write think lesson plan to get students to understand underlying historical issues of copyright law
cc omalley

Want to Build Better E-Learning Courses? Think Beer » The Rapid eLearning Blog - 6 views

  •  
    What are the elements of different kinds of E-Learning courses
  •  
    Defines differences in courses
cc omalley

Dsaweb - 3 views

  •  
    See the Digital Storytelling cookbook
  •  
    How-to for digital storytelling
cc omalley

Kineo_Insight_Rapid_Design.pdf (application/pdf Object) - 3 views

  •  
    How to design a course
  •  
    This is a guide for designing a course from kineo's "60 Minute Masters"
cc omalley

Wiggio - Makes it easy to work in groups. - 5 views

  •  
    A tool that allows collaboration and real-time polling
cc omalley

SafeShare.TV - The Safest Way To Share YouTube videos - 8 views

  •  
    "Not only does SafeShare.TV remove distracting and offensive elements around YouTube videos, but it also allows you to crop videos before sharing them."
  •  
    Safeshare edits offensive content in Youtube so you can show it in school? Is this a youtube sanctioned group? Do creators of the material on youtube get a say?
cc omalley

NETS_for_Students_2007_Standards.pdf (application/pdf Object) - 3 views

  •  
    1. Creativity and Innovation Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology. 2. Communication and Collaboration Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others. 3. Research and Information Fluency Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information. 4. Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, and Decision Making Students use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems, and make informed decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources. 5. Digital Citizenship Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior. 6. Technology Operations and Concepts Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems, and operations.
  •  
    ISTE standards for Students
cc omalley

Blogging Services (106 sites) : Web 2.0 Directory : eConsultant - 7 views

  •  
    Tools for blogging and adding widgets to blogs broken down by services offered. Really helpful in sorting out all the options available!
cc omalley

Kevin Honeycutt - 7 views

  •  
    Site showing uses of technology in education
cc omalley

Walker TRC-Critical Thinking - 0 views

  • Wade (1995) identifies 8 characteristics of critical thinking. Critical thinking involves asking questions, defining a problem, examining evidence, analyzing assumptions and biases, avoiding emotional reasoning, avoiding oversimplification, considering other interpretations, and tolerating ambiguity. Dealing with ambiguity is also seen by Strohm & Baukus (1995) as an essential part of critical thinking, "Ambiguity and doubt serve a critical-thinking function and are a necessary and even a productive part of the process" (p. 56).
  • Through technology, the amount of information available today is massive. This infomation explosion is likely to continue in the future. Students need a guide to weed through the information and not just passively accept it. Students need to "develop and effectively apply critical thinking skills to their academic studies, to the complex problems that they will face, and to the critical choices they will be forced to make as a result of the information explosion and other rapid technological changes" (Oliver & Utermohlen, p. 1 ).
  • Dialogues: Robertson and Rane-Szostak (1996) identify two methods of stimulating useful discussions in the classroom: Written dialogues: Give students written dialogues to analyze. In small groups, students must identify the different viewpoints of each participant in the dialogue. Must look for biases, presence or exclusion of important evidence, alternative interpretations, misstatement of facts, and errors in reasoning. Each group must decide which view is the most reasonable. After coming to a conclusion, each group acts out their dialogue and explains their analysis of it. Spontaneous Group Dialogue: One group of students are assigned roles to play in a discussion (such as leader, information giver, opinion seeker, and disagreer). Four observer groups are formed with the functions of determining what roles are being played by whom, identifying biases and errors in thinking, evaluating reasoning skills, and examining ethical implications of the content.
  • ...1 more annotation...
  • CATS (Classroom Assessment Techniques): Angelo stresses the use of ongoing classroom assessment as a way to monitor and facilitate students' critical thinking. An example of a CAT is to ask students to write a "Minute Paper" responding to questions such as "What was the most important thing you learned in today's class? What question related to this session remains uppermost in your mind?" The teacher selects some of the papers and prepares responses for the next class meeting.
  •  
    Wade (1995) identifies 8 characteristics of critical thinking. Critical thinking involves asking questions, defining a problem, examining evidence, analyzing assumptions and biases, avoiding emotional reasoning, avoiding oversimplification, considering other interpretations, and tolerating ambiguity. Dealing with ambiguity is also seen by Strohm & Baukus (1995) as an essential part of critical thinking, "Ambiguity and doubt serve a critical-thinking function and are a necessary and even a productive part of the process" (p. 56).
  •  
    definitions and characteristics of critical thinking to make transparent to students what we mean when we tell them to do higher order thinking
cc omalley

Interrogating Texts: 6 Reading Habits to Develop in Your First Year at Harvard - Resear... - 3 views

  •  
    * Previewing * Annotating * Outline, summarize, analyze * Look for repetitions and patterns * Contextualize * Compare and Contrast
  •  
    Steps to becoming a more critical reader, when there is little time to reread
cc omalley

Authentic Assessment Toolbox Home Page - 4 views

  •  
    the Authentic Assessment Toolbox, a how-to text on creating authentic tasks, rubrics and standards for measuring and improving student learning.
1 - 20 of 25 Next ›
Showing 20 items per page