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Contents contributed and discussions participated by lovinget2

lovinget2

E-Portfolios as Digital Stories of Deep Learning on Vimeo - 2 views

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    Helen Barrett presentation 4/28/11
lovinget2

brain-based e-learning | Scoop.it - 1 views

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    multiple sources on brain-based learning, social-emotional learning, and educational technology
lovinget2

Accommodations | DO-IT - 5 views

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    neat and user-friendly! Look up the disability, look up the activity, find accommodations!
lovinget2

IDI Web Accessibility Checker : Web Accessibility Checker - 2 views

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    highly recommended by Almudena
lovinget2

WebAIM: Web Accessibility for Designers - 0 views

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    ACCESSIBLE DESIGN
lovinget2

WebAIM: Constructing a POUR Website - Putting People at the Center of the Process - 0 views

shared by lovinget2 on 04 Feb 15 - No Cached
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    POUR - Perceivable, Operable, Understandable, Robust
lovinget2

WebAIM: Motor Disabilities - Types of Motor Disabilities - 0 views

  • Spinal cord injuries can result in a state of paralysis of the limbs. Paralysis of the legs is called paraplegia. Paralysis of the legs and arms is called quadriplegia.
  • Individuals with paraplegia generally have no difficulty accessing the Internet. Individuals with quadriplegia, however, may have significant difficulties,
  • someone who has lost both limbs may need to make use of other technologies, such as the ones used by individuals with quadriplegia (head wands, mouth sticks, voice recognition software, etc.).
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  • Cerebral palsy is an injury to the brain
  • resulting in decreased muscle control (palsy). The condition usually occurs during fetal development, but can also occur at or shortly after birth. Common characteristics of cerebral palsy include muscle tightness or spasm, involuntary movement, and impaired speech. Severe cases can lead to paralysis.
  • Many people with cerebral palsy are able to use computers, but usually have a difficult time using a mouse. Their arm movements are often too jerky and unpredictable to use a mouse effectively. They can usually use a keyboard, or an adaptive keyboard, though more slowly than individuals without cerebral palsy. Oftentimes they will use keyboards with raised areas in between the keys, to allow them to place their hand on the raised area, then press their fingers down onto the key that they wish to type. Regular keyboards can be adapted to this same purpose by the use of keyboard overlays. This reduces the likelihood of errors while typing.
  • Muscular dystrophy (MD) is a genetic disorder in which the genes for muscle proteins are damaged. It is characterized by the progressive degeneration of the muscles.
  • The assistive technologies used by individuals with MD depend on the severity of the condition, but generally include the same technologies already mentioned
  • (head wands, mouth sticks, adaptive keyboard, voice recognition software, etc.).
  • In individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS), the myelin (a layer of fatty tissue which surrounds nerve fibers) erodes, rendering the nerve fibers incapable of sending signals from the central nervous system to the muscles of the body. The milder cases of MS can result in one or more of the following symptoms: tremors, weakness, numbness, unstable walking, spasticity, slurred speech, muscle stiffness, or impaired memory. Severe cases can result in partial or complete paralysis. Not all individuals with MS experience all of the symptoms and, interestingly, the same individual may experience different sets of symptoms at different times. The types of technologies used are the same as for other motor disabilities.
  • Spina bifida is a congenital condition in which the spine fails to close properly during the first month of pregnancy.
  • Key Concepts Key Concepts: Motor Impairments Challenges Solutions Users may not be able to use the mouse. Make sure that all functions are available from the keyboard (try tabbing from link to link). Users may not be able to control the mouse or the keyboard well. Make sure that your pages are error-tolerant (e.g. ask "are you sure you want to delete this file?"), do not create small links or moving links. Users may be using voice-activated software. Voice-activated software can replicate mouse movement, but not as efficiently as it can replicate keyboard functionality, so make sure that all functions are available from the keyboard. Users may become fatigued when using "puff-and-sip" or similar adaptive technologies. Provide a method for skipping over long lists of links or other lengthy content. Next
lovinget2

WebAIM: Motor Disabilities - Introduction - 0 views

  • When asked in an online, chat-based interview if he saw "this medium of cyberspace as one that's particularly useful for people society labels as 'disabled?'" Mr. Reeve replied: "Yes. [The Internet is] an essential tool. And, literally, a lifeline for many disabled people. I have Dragon Dictate. And while I was in rehab, I learned to operate it by voice. And I have enjoyed corresponding with friends and strangers with that system. Many disabled people have to spend long hours alone. Voice-activated computers are a means of communication that can prevent a sense of isolation."
  • Have you ever thought of the Internet as being "essential" or "a lifeline for many disabled people?"
  • They are independent as long as the sites that they want to access are designed to permit disability access.
lovinget2

WebAIM: Auditory Disabilities - Introduction - 0 views

  • multimedia content (meaning video content that also has audio
  • provide transcripts for audio-only content.
  • The techniques for providing accessibility for users with disabilities are very straightforward - provide captions and transcripts for
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    • lovinget2
       
      "And I want that person to respect me, and I think that that would solve a lot of problems."   Shared by Curtis Radford, this man here in this video
    • lovinget2
       
      accessible design
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    straightforward!
lovinget2

Web Content Accessibility Guidelines Working Group (WCAG WG) - 0 views

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    detailed, complete
lovinget2

WAVE Web Accessibility Tool - 0 views

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    works really well and easily
lovinget2

Projects & Programs - Trace Center - 0 views

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    Research to Make Everyday Technologies Accessible & Usable…
lovinget2

Introduction to Screen Readers - YouTube - 1 views

shared by lovinget2 on 04 Feb 15 - No Cached
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    Cool!
lovinget2

Matt Cutts Discusses the Importance of alt Tags - YouTube - 0 views

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    Google images
lovinget2

Understanding Accessibility: The Basics - 0 views

  • The alternative text should be vivid detailed.
  • Images that are purely decorative should have the following alternative text: alt="" This tells screen readers to skip the graphic since it contains no instructional meaning,
  • Use standard, acceptable HTML without extensions. Most advanced HTML editing systems provide accessibility tools.
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  • Remember that output which is effectively translated by a speech synthesizer must be rendered in text-only format. If you can navigate your site successfully with images turned off, your site will be accessible to speech synthesizers.
  • Minimize the number of links
  • Be sure that text and background are crisp and clear with respect to color
  • Provide transcripts
  • Test your pages and your site using a variety of browsers.
  • Advanced designers always use an accessibility validation system, to check their pages for accessibility
lovinget2

Five-Minute Film Festival: The Power of Assistive Technology | Edutopia - 0 views

  • learning or motor disabilities
  • Check out Edutopia curator Ashley Cronin's new roundup on assistive technology for a comprehensive list of resources;
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