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Cara Whitehead

February: Black History Month - 0 views

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    February is Black History Month. Here's a word list to add to your lesson plans! This list can be used to play all of the games and activities on our site. http://www.spellingcity.com/view-spelling-list.html?listId=2851114
A Chou

DocsTeach from The National Archives - 0 views

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    A treasure trove of all kinds of primary documents from The National Archives. Educators can choose to search for specific documents, but the best part is the standards-based, interactive lessons based on key historical eras. In addition, there is a creation tool, with several templates, to put together your own activities drawing on the Archives' documents. The iPad app makes excellent use of the interactive templates (students can use a code to access specific lessons). Student use a variety of critical thinking skills and are prompted to engage in reflective and research-based writing.
Paul Jinks

The history of distance learning [Infographic] | ZDNet - 3 views

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    Unfortunately the infographic is a bit tricky to read, nevertheless an interesting overview of the history of DL. 
maribel hokanson

ancient rome - 0 views

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    This Personalized SE is all about ancient Rome. Some fun info and also some serious material. You will also learn more about how ancient Rome compares to modern day America.
Lori Moody

Interactives - 0 views

  • "Interactives" provides educators and students with strategies, content, and activities that can enhance and improve students' skills in a variety of curricular areas. Geometry 3D Shapes (Grades 6-8) Learn about three-dimensional shapes, how to calculate their surface area and volume as well as their mathematical properties. Math in Daily Life (Grades 9-12) Explore how math can help us in our daily lives by looking at the language of numbers through common situations, such as playing games or cooking. Metric Conversions (Grades 6-8) Learn how metric and English symbols are used to measure and express mass, length, volume and temperature. Statistics (Grades 9-12) Follow a year in a fictitious election campaign for an inside look at the mathematics behind the polls and the news you hear everyday. Elements of a Story (Grades 2-5) Learn secrets for telling a good story, explore narratives -- heroes, plot and background. Then, write a story of your own.
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    lots of interactive games for math, science, language arts, history, and art
Caroline Watters

NOVA | Bones of Contention - 1 views

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    NOVA has great video clips and online resources. Some, such as the "Bones of Contention" activity are interactive
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    I have used this NOVA website for numerous projects in my classes. It has biology and history information, along with many other subjects. Inaddition to worksheets and teacher's guides, it also has interactive functions where students can work together and conplete tasks. The best part about it is that students find it very easy to use.
Jean LaPaze

Strategies for Making History Relevant in the Classroom | Hosam Mansour.com - 0 views

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    Help in ways to make history curriculum relevant
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    Help in ways to make history curriculum relevant
Jean LaPaze

Making History Interesting - 0 views

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    Information source on ideas to make history interesting for students who do not like history.
Jean LaPaze

Teaching Issues: Western Civilization Syllabus - 0 views

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    Materials to refernce in developing a curriculum for teaching high school or college level Western Civilization
Jean LaPaze

TEACHINGpoint - Western Civilization - 0 views

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    Source for teaching guides on all subjects
Carol Kubota

Timeline Maker Software | Create Professional Timeline Charts - fast! - 0 views

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    This is a fantastic tool for making timelines. It is not free. Take the four minute tour to find out what it really does.
Joe Earley

Center for History and New Media » Teaching + Learning - 0 views

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    This is one of the top centers for applying IT to the study and research of history. Centered at George Mason University, this group is really writing the book on how to teach history using technology. Really great stuff.
Anna Lardinois

Web 2.0 Footnote.com - The place for original historical documents online - 0 views

  • Documents and Community Reveal a New Side of History
    • Anna Lardinois
       
      This tool is a great boon for those who use historical research in the classroom. While it is only free on a limited basis, the pay tool will give students access to thousands of primary source documents not available in most school or community libraries.
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    At Footnote.com you'll be able to view, save, and share original images of historical documents available for the first time on the internet.
Dennis OConnor

John Quincy Adams, Twitterer? - NYTimes.com - 0 views

  • They may be two centuries old, but, written with staccato-like brevity, entries from one of Adams’s diaries resemble tweets sufficiently that they began appearing Wednesday on Twitter.
  • The diary, which Adams maintained until April 1836, is a rarity among the many he kept, in that the description for each day is no more than one line long. Historians believe he used the descriptions as references to longer entries in other journals.
  • Word spread, and the society decided to tweet the entries. They average 110 to 120 characters, below the 140-character limit imposed by Twitter, and there is nary an LOL or BFF among them.
  • ...2 more annotations...
  • The posts will link to maps that, using the latitude and longitude coordinates from his entries, pinpoint his progress across the ocean. There will also be links to the longer entries of other Adams diaries, which can be found on the society’s Web site, http://www.masshist.org/jqadiaries/.
  • The idea appears to be working. As of Wednesday evening, only nine hours after the first entry was Twittered, the post had more than 4,800 followers, and Mr. Dibbell said the number was climbing.
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    Clever use of social networking tech. The initial take on twitter was that it just broadcast mindless sort personal observations. This use turns that idea around. Interesting way to teach a bit of history. What if we started tweeting Basho & Issa, the great Japanese haiku poets? Hmmm sounds like a fun lit project doesn't it?
Margaret Lentz

Internet Archive - 0 views

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    To view any non-working sites, paste their URLs into the Wayback Machine at this site
Dennis OConnor

Doug Engelbart: The Demo - 0 views

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    This is the orignal 1968 Englebart demonstration of technology innovations. A black and white video capturing the work at Stanford Research Institute and Douglas Englebart. He works to show, rather than tell what being an computer powered intellectural worker. This is the Demo Called: The mother of all Demos, credited with launching so much of what we live with today in a wired world. He's showing his audience break through ideas like typing text on a screen, copying text, making lists, quickly revising ideas, saving a file, being able to recall notes, jumping from text to text... how it starts with a blank screen. To our modern eyes, this seems so very basic. It's easy to forget that in 1968 computers were mainframe monsters available only to rich corporations, universities, and the government. Here we see the origins of the personal computer and better understand the transformation impact of ideas. After demonstrating what would become 'word processing', Englebar begins to draw on the screen and relate this drawing of his route home from the office to his shopping list. The impact of this Demo changed the world. Viewing it now reminds us of just how far we've come with the tools of thinking. The question is what do we do with the technology? This was the question asked at the Sloan-C symposium in San Francisco this month. (June 2009). Englelbart feels his life's work was dedicated to creating the potential for global problem solving. He challenged a room full of university professors who are the early adopters of e-learning to use the tools and technology we now have to solve the problems, wondering aloud why more hadn't already been done. As academics live in the silos of their disciplines, some reach out beyond the traditional barriers to share, think, research, and learn together. Others sit on committees endlessly define and describing what was, rather that what will be.
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    This is the original 1968 Englebart teleconference demonstration of technology innovations. A black and white video capturing the work at Stanford Research Institute and Douglas Englebart. He works to show, rather than tell what being an computer powered intellectual worker. This is the Demo Called: The mother of all Demos, credited with launching so much of what we live with today in a wired world. He's showing his audience break through ideas like typing text on a screen, copying text, making lists, quickly revising ideas, saving a file, being able to recall notes, jumping from text to text... how it starts with a blank screen. The name of his workspace says so much: Human Intellect Research Center at SRI... as I watch this man demo jumping from link to link on the page, I see the birth of hypertext. I'm on YouTube watching and listening as his ideas unfold and I recall his brief speech on stage (at age 84) recalling the moment when he recognized the enormous power of being able to link ideas in what would some day become known in cyberspace. For that moment, as he traced the movement of ideas in the air with his hands you could see the young man's mind and passion renewed. To our modern eyes, this work will seem a bit nerdy and very basic. His 1968 focus is on a basic process: compose, study modify. His point being that simply linear thinking is inadequate to the task when building complex systems. It's easy to forget that in 1968 computers were mainframe monsters available only to rich corporations, universities, and the government. Here we see the origins of the personal computer and better understand the transformation impact of ideas. After demonstrating what would become 'word processing', Englebar begins to draw on the screen and relate this drawing of his route home from the office to his shopping list. We cut to a feed from Menlo Park that demonstrates the Mouse. Englebart explains the technology that has changed very little sin
Dennis OConnor

Engelbart Mural - 0 views

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    The Co-Evolution of Human Systems and Tool Systems. Here's the Englebart Mural created by acolytes of Englebart who have developed a massive wall mural depicting the thinking and historical impact of Englebart's work at SRI. Included is a graphic/noted display of Englebart's 1968 "Mother of All Demos" presenting break-through technology prototypes that are the foundation for the information age. Heady stuff, presented with old world technology (a mural). This links to the actual image you can scroll through, download, examine in some depth. I have to believe that someone out there has developed an interactive version of this work.
Dennis OConnor

Google Earth - 0 views

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    Open Google Earth and select "Ancient Rome 3D" in the Gallery layer. Flyby of ancient Rome. Inlcudes link to teacher curriculum competition
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