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Dennis OConnor

Assessment in E-Learning | University of Wisconsin - Stout - 0 views

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    "100% Online Course 3 graduate semester hour credits Instructor: Maggie Rouman Tuition: $441 per semester hour graduate credit ($1,323 per course) Spring: March 4 - April 26, 2019 Tuition Due - February 27, 2019 If you n"
Dennis OConnor

Assessment in Online Courses  - Online Course - Graduate Certificate Program ... - 7 views

  • DescriptionPerformance-based assessment, summative and formative feedback methods to assess student learning in the online classroom. Explore how to use voice and video technology options to assist with time saving grading procedures while increasing the amount of feedback, prevention of plagiarism in the digital environment, strategies for assessing online discussion postings and replies, using blogs and wikis as evidence of learning, evaluating group assignments in an online setting, polling and opinion gathering via laptop, iPad, iPod Touch, iPhone, and smartphones, and evaluating eportfolios. Become familiar with assessment strategies that could make or break your online course.
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    Choose one section: EDUC 762 930 January 9 - March 2, 2012 Instructor: Datta Kaur Khalsa EDUC 762 931 March 5 - May 4, 2012 Instructor: Jim Erbe
Margot Laird

DigitalBloomsTaxonomyGuide.pdf (application/pdf Object) - 0 views

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    43-page update to Bloom's Revised Taxonomy that integrates new processes and actions associated with Web 2.0 technologies.
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    43-page update to Bloom's Revised Taxonomy that integrates new processes and actions associated with Web 2.0 technologies.
cc omalley

Rubrics for Assessment Online Professional Development - UW Stout, Wisconsin's Polytech... - 6 views

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    Rubrics for everything
cc omalley

SmartSurvey.pdf (application/pdf Object) - 4 views

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    How to create valid surveys that people will take
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    Guidelines for creating valid surveys-will help in crating assessments
cc omalley

Want to Build Better E-Learning Courses? Think Beer » The Rapid eLearning Blog - 6 views

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    What are the elements of different kinds of E-Learning courses
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    Defines differences in courses
cc omalley

Dsaweb - 3 views

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    See the Digital Storytelling cookbook
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    How-to for digital storytelling
cc omalley

Kineo_Insight_Rapid_Design.pdf (application/pdf Object) - 3 views

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    How to design a course
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    This is a guide for designing a course from kineo's "60 Minute Masters"
cc omalley

Blogging Services (106 sites) : Web 2.0 Directory : eConsultant - 7 views

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    Tools for blogging and adding widgets to blogs broken down by services offered. Really helpful in sorting out all the options available!
cc omalley

Kevin Honeycutt - 7 views

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    Site showing uses of technology in education
cc omalley

Interrogating Texts: 6 Reading Habits to Develop in Your First Year at Harvard - Resear... - 3 views

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    * Previewing * Annotating * Outline, summarize, analyze * Look for repetitions and patterns * Contextualize * Compare and Contrast
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    Steps to becoming a more critical reader, when there is little time to reread
cc omalley

Authentic Assessment Toolbox Home Page - 4 views

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    the Authentic Assessment Toolbox, a how-to text on creating authentic tasks, rubrics and standards for measuring and improving student learning.
cc omalley

Big6 » Blog Archive » The Big6 in a Web2.0 World, Big6 eNews, 10.4, 2 (Grades... - 2 views

  • The Big6 is a natural component to Web2.0, because it is collaborative in nature, flexible, and provides prospect for lifelong learning. The six steps of the Big6; Task Definition, Information Seeking Strategies, Location and Access, Use of Information, Synthesis, and Evaluation all lend themselves to integration with a variety of Web2.0 applications.
  • Big6 Skills by Web2.0 Tools Matrix Big6 Skill Relevant Web2.0 Tool Uses Task Definition iGoogle (http://igoogle.com) WiseMapping (http://wisemapping.com/c/home.htm) Webspiration (http://www.mywebspiration.com/) iGoogle -  Identify a task, use a calendar to keep track and synthesize research goals and deadlines. WiseMapping is a free concept mapping application that allows you to create visual representation of a task. Webspiration is an excellent online resource for mindmapping and visual thinking. Currently available in free public beta format. Info Seeking Strategy RSS- - iGoogle (http://igoogle.com) - Newsgator  (http://www.newsgator.com/business/enterpriseserver/default.aspx) - Google Reader (http://google.com/reader) YouTube (http://www.youtube.com) RSS (Really Simple Syndication) brings specialized content to one location. YouTube:  Search for topic related interviews, reports, or presentations. Location & Access Delicious – http://delicious.com Zotero (http://www.zotero.com) Delicious – Allows users to access their personal account, and retrieve saved bookmarks, from any computer. This is a great way to save information for retrieval at a later date. Zotero – used to capture web pages. Available for Firefox users only. Use of Info Delicious – http://delicious.com Google Docs (http://www.google.com/google-d-s/intl/en/tour1.html) Scriblink (http://www.scriblink.com) Delicious – A website where users can store, tag, and make notes on web pages discovered during the Location and Access phase. Google Docs – Create, share, edit, upload documents, presentations, or other files. Scriblink: Online whiteboard. Take notes and share with others, or save for future use. Synthesis Google Docs (http://www.google.com/google-d-s/intl/en/tour1.html) Zotero – (http://www.zotero.com) Google Groups (http://groups.google.com/) YouTube (http://www.youtube.com) Google Docs: Create, share, edit, upload documents, presentations, or other files. Zotero- PDF documents or other content Google Groups: Members of groups can upload, share, and edit documents or presentations. A great way to collaborate on projects across the classroom or country. Create a video presentation to share your findings on YouTube Evaluation Slideshare (http://www.slideshare.net/) RubiStar (http://rubistar.4teachers.org/) With Slideshare, students can post PPT presentations, and have peer evaluators offer feedback. Additionally, the professor can view the finished project to provide assessment. Rubrics are a great way to encourage students to evaluate their finished product. RubiStar is just one of the numerous free rubric generators available on the Internt. Through the use of a rubric, students and professors can individually assess work, or peer review could be conducted as well.
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    Big 6 is a step-by-step program I follow to teach research skills-this article suggests which web 2.0 tools to use at each step. This will be a big help for me in transitioning to online
cc omalley

View - Assessment in E-Learning-SU10-961C - Stout - 2 views

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    technology, the art of teaching, and the needs of learners are converging. As such, this paper explores dozens of emerging learning technologies that are generating waves of new opportunities in online learning environments. In addition, this manuscript reviews trends in online enrolments, programs, and degrees in colleges and universities in the United States and around the world. To help create engaging content, pedagogical activities are outlined for synchronous and asynchronous learning with estimates of the degree of instructor risk and time as well as technological cost. Such activities focus on experiences that are rich in collaboration, interaction, and motivation. Finally, in the fourth storm, budgetary cutbacks are discussed which are restricting how colleges and universities can respond to these emerging technologies, enormous learner demands, and enhancements in pedagogy.
cc omalley

Boomers, Gen-Xers and Millenials: Understanding the New Students - 1 views

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    Ten attributes of new students zero tolerance for delays lines between consumer and creator blurring (copyright/creativity) staying connected is essentia typing preferred over handwriting multitasking a way of life learning involves gaming model-try and fail to gain info doing is more important than knowing reality is not real-Photoshop, isp proxys-don't really know what is real internet is better than tv computers aren't technology-they're the norm
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    This does a great job of explaining student expectations based on generations. I have multi-aged classrooms, so I can use this for thinking about audience needs when designing courses.
cc omalley

Illinois Online Network: Educational Resources - 0 views

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    * Participate in the virtual classroom 5-7 days a week * Be able to work with others in completing projects * Be able to use the technology properly * Be able to meet the minimum standards as set forth by the institution * Be able to complete assignments on time * Enjoy communicating in writing.
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    User-friendly guide to online learner characteristics. I'd like to get permission to adapt it and use it as part of a policy handbook.
Monique Jordan

Digital Information Fluency Model - 1 views

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    SearchEvaluationCitation Tutorials MicroModulesSearch Challenges Resources TipsCore CompetenciesEvent MaterialsWeb Site InvestigatorDigital InvestigatorAnnotated Links Interactive Keyword BlogSearch Challenge BlogWizard WikiInfo Fluency Ning Online Courses Moodle Main PageCourse DescriptionsCourse FAQ About Us Our TeamOur PartnersOur CommunityContact Us Digital Information Fluency Model DIF CircleDIF FAQs Digital Information Fluency (DIF) is the ability to find, evaluate and use digital information effectively, efficiently and ethically. DIF involves knowing how digital information is different from print information; having the skills to use specialized tools for finding digital information; and developing the dispositions needed in the digital information environment. As teachers and librarians develop these skills and teach them to students, students will become better equipped to achieve their information needs. Digital Information Fluency Model
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    Goes together well with Big 6
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    Reading from Module 5
cc omalley

Walker TRC-Critical Thinking - 0 views

  • Wade (1995) identifies 8 characteristics of critical thinking. Critical thinking involves asking questions, defining a problem, examining evidence, analyzing assumptions and biases, avoiding emotional reasoning, avoiding oversimplification, considering other interpretations, and tolerating ambiguity. Dealing with ambiguity is also seen by Strohm & Baukus (1995) as an essential part of critical thinking, "Ambiguity and doubt serve a critical-thinking function and are a necessary and even a productive part of the process" (p. 56).
  • Through technology, the amount of information available today is massive. This infomation explosion is likely to continue in the future. Students need a guide to weed through the information and not just passively accept it. Students need to "develop and effectively apply critical thinking skills to their academic studies, to the complex problems that they will face, and to the critical choices they will be forced to make as a result of the information explosion and other rapid technological changes" (Oliver & Utermohlen, p. 1 ).
  • Dialogues: Robertson and Rane-Szostak (1996) identify two methods of stimulating useful discussions in the classroom: Written dialogues: Give students written dialogues to analyze. In small groups, students must identify the different viewpoints of each participant in the dialogue. Must look for biases, presence or exclusion of important evidence, alternative interpretations, misstatement of facts, and errors in reasoning. Each group must decide which view is the most reasonable. After coming to a conclusion, each group acts out their dialogue and explains their analysis of it. Spontaneous Group Dialogue: One group of students are assigned roles to play in a discussion (such as leader, information giver, opinion seeker, and disagreer). Four observer groups are formed with the functions of determining what roles are being played by whom, identifying biases and errors in thinking, evaluating reasoning skills, and examining ethical implications of the content.
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  • CATS (Classroom Assessment Techniques): Angelo stresses the use of ongoing classroom assessment as a way to monitor and facilitate students' critical thinking. An example of a CAT is to ask students to write a "Minute Paper" responding to questions such as "What was the most important thing you learned in today's class? What question related to this session remains uppermost in your mind?" The teacher selects some of the papers and prepares responses for the next class meeting.
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    This is a wonderful resource from the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga that helps define critical thinking. It includes eight characteristics of critical thinking, a rationale for teaching it, and strategies for promoting related skills.
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    Wade (1995) identifies 8 characteristics of critical thinking. Critical thinking involves asking questions, defining a problem, examining evidence, analyzing assumptions and biases, avoiding emotional reasoning, avoiding oversimplification, considering other interpretations, and tolerating ambiguity. Dealing with ambiguity is also seen by Strohm & Baukus (1995) as an essential part of critical thinking, "Ambiguity and doubt serve a critical-thinking function and are a necessary and even a productive part of the process" (p. 56).
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    definitions and characteristics of critical thinking to make transparent to students what we mean when we tell them to do higher order thinking
Judy Satkiewicz

Hot Potatoes Home Page - 0 views

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    Hot Potatoes is a freeware program that allows you to create multiple-choice, short-answer, jumbled-sentence, crossword, matching/ordering and gap-fill exercises. Create your Hot Potatoes activity, save as html, and then add it as an activity to a Moodle course.
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