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Nigel Coutts

A pedagogy for Cultural Understanding & Human Empathy - The Learner's Way - 0 views

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    How we see ourselves, how we describe ourselves reveals a great deal about how we see 'others'. In May of this year, speaking to the audience of the International Conference on Thinking, Bruno Della Chiesa invited us to consider how we might approach the question of "who we are?". In responding to such a question, what list of affiliations do we invoke to define ourselves?
Nigel Coutts

Towards a pedagogy for life-worthy learning - The Learner's Way - 3 views

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    In the contemporary classroom, there is much greater consideration of what the learner does in partnership with their teacher so that they develop the capacity to learn. Classroom routines and structures are designed to engage the learner in a rich process of dialogical learning. 
Nigel Coutts

The purposes of our pedagogy - The Learner's Way - 0 views

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    The debate over the most effective method of instruction continues as ever and where one stands on the topic is largely influenced by the purposes one attaches to education. Analysing a series of research articles reveals the nature of the debate between advocates of direct instruction compared to those who support a problem based learning methodology.
David Carpenter

Learning Activity Types (LAT) - 0 views

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    Pedagogy comes before the tools as Dr. Harris and Dr. Hofer of William Mary apply the TPACK approach to curriculum-based technology integration. LEARNING ACTIVITY TYPES K-6 Literacy Mathematics Music Physical Education Science Secondary English Language Arts Social Studies Visual Arts World Languages.
Paul Jinks

Personalized Learning, Backpacks Full of Cash, Rockstar Teachers, and MOOC Madness | Be... - 2 views

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    Wide ranging presentation on the implications of technology implementation at school level in the US. Technology tends to extend current practice rather than overthrow it. Familiar forms succeed over novel ones (see success of Khan Academy, Coursera). Treating students as individual consumers rather than members of (learning) communities is the thin end of a wedge which radically changes what education is about.
Paul Jinks

MOOC pedagogy: the challenges of developing for Coursera | ALT Online Newsletter - 3 views

  • Firstly there is the issue of digital mimicry.  The Coursera platform, alongside rival Stanford start-up Udacity and the non-profit venture ‘edX’ from Harvard and MIT, currently hosts courses that are broadly conservative in terms of online educational practices.  All of these MOOC platforms appear to justify their status by promoting curricula that are equivalent to campus-based courses, with a strong focus on content delivery and an emphasis on the rigor and formality of their assessment methods.  However, some of the most interesting and innovative practices in online education have emerged by challenging these very ideas; loosening institutional control of learning outcomes and assessment criteria, shifting from a focus on content delivery to a foregrounding of process, community and learning networks, and working with more exploratory assessment methods – digital and multimodal assignments, peer assessment and group assignments, for example.
  • For a team who are often concerned with questioning the uncritical emulation of conventional offline practices in the digital domain, there seem to be opportunities here to experiment with the Coursera platform to productively challenge prevailing course models.
  • The question of scale also highlights another core issue we have been concerned with in our conventional online teaching – that of contact and dialogue between tutors and students, and between students themselves. We would hold that this is what drives good online education: contact may be heavily mediated, but it is still there, and it is still the key determinant of generative teaching and high levels of student satisfaction
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  • Within this scenario, the persona of the course tutor can become more that of a celebrity with an almost talismanic status than a present, real teacher. In our conventional online teaching we’ve worked hard to maintain and build the role of the teacher in the face of a tendency – driven by a sometimes uncritical emphasis on learner-centredness – to push the role into the background. So we are keen to avoid both the over-celebratory fetishizing of the teacher associated with some MOOCs, and the tendency to see the technology as allowing us to write the teacher out of the equation altogether. We want to explore how a MOOC pedagogy might work with a construction of the teacher that has an immediacy that can succeed at scale.
  • We also feel it’s an important opportunity to participate in an emerging pedagogical mode that is significantly under-theorised.  The University of Edinburgh’s partnership with Coursera presents us with an opportunity to research the new and sometimes uncomfortable territory that the MOOC foregrounds, a prospect that will allow us to engage meaningfully, critically, and productively with the shifting landscapes of open education.  MOOCs currently have enough devotees to generate a real swell of enthusiasm in academia.  However if they are to develop and mature longer term, they need to be researched and subjected to serious scholarly and analytic work.
  • We are attempting to develop a course which initiates reading, critical viewing of films and structured discussion as the primary pedagogical activities.  Visual artefacts will be generated, and employed as a means of building dialogue and debate around key e-learning themes. We hope to encourage the kinds of spaces that participants can both contribute to and, crucially, take ownership of.  Participatory practices and customs in the wider social web are integral to this approach, and we’re interested in how the pedagogical modes operating within platforms like Coursera can be productively extended to create more open learning spaces, integrating our work with public services and sites beyond the platform. We are also concerned with exploring whether the visual practices foregrounded in digital media use might challenge the dominance of text, and its associated forms of knowledge, in established academic traditions.  With this in mind, assessing participation is something to which we will take a creative and visual approach, focusing on peer-assessment techniques over the automated MCQ strategies that are most-used in Coursera MOOCs.  One of the real challenges with the MOOC format is the extent to which it can be sensitive towards the kinds of assessment methods that underpin many humanities and social science disciplines.
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    Fascinating piece by the University of Edinburgh team launching an online course with Coursera in the new year. Really uplifting to see them holding fast to their values and principles and trying to express these in the MOOC context. 
Paul Jinks

Ugly Learning | Educator, Learner - 5 views

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    Talking about the 'flipped classroom' Brian Bennett discusses how students and others responses to change are likely to be negative at first. He goes on to say that grades are not necessarily the best indicator of learning taking place (learning is messy). "Do not sacrifice what you know is right for your students for a number".  "good pedagogy, collaboration and reflection" are emphasised. 
Paul Jinks

The 21st century pedagogy teachers should be aware of - 6 views

  • Interpersonal learning , personalized learning, second life learning , 3d learning, collaborative learning and virtual learning , these are just some of the few buzz words you would be hearing so often in today’s educational literature. Things have changed , old methods and pedagogies are no longer relevant. The teacher-controlled learning where deconstructed and reconstructed information is presented in a highly formal and standardized classroom settings becomes very obsolete. The urgent questions we should , as educators , ask ourselves are : what is the driving engine behind this huge  transformation in learning ? and Do we need a new pedagogy to better enhance learning ?  Advancements in technology and particularly social networking technologies are changing the whole educational framework . Users now can have access to information whenever and wherever they want  . Blogs , wikis, socializing sites, podcasts, networks are more and more democratizing knowledge and creating huge impacts on the process of schooling. It is evident now that the fact that the 20th and 21st century learning is different in terms of skills and perceptions, the need for a new educational model , a serious rethinking of the nature of schooling , its goals, pedagogies, curriculum , structures, and assumptions is persistently urgently, and as has been mentioned in the popular " 21st century Teaching and Learning Skills Ebook " students today are digitally focused and require new skills that would meet up the needs of this new era.But the thing teaching new skills is not the only solution there is more to it than just that, in fact  we need a new pedagogy with specific features that  would cover every aspect. If you want to learn more about teacher’s skills in the 21st century then read  the 21st century skills teachers should have. To help you better understand the pillars of this pedagogy you need to watch this short video to see how different the 20th century teacher from the 21st century one.
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    A bit untidy, not very scholarly (everything that is described as C21 learning was being done in the C19 without computers) but nonetheless an interesting view of what pedagogy should be like.
Debi Griggs

Heutagogy & The Craft of Teaching « The Heutagogic Archives - 0 views

  • From Andragogy to Heutagogy
  • key factors in turning teaching professionals into Learning Brokers;
  • a) Writes the syllabus & develops the learning process; get engaged in defining the syllabus you will deliver and the ‘Learning and Teaching’ strategies you will use to deliver it. b) Enable learners to follow the ‘interests’ that motivate them; once you have acquired the experience you need to build a distinct relationship with everyone you ‘teach’ The greatest area of flexibility emerges once you identify which interests best motivates different learners. c) Supports & facilitate collaborative learning; learning is a social process and once you have freed up the motivational drivers in learners you need to support the groups and group learning processes which will eventually enable them to become more self-directed in their learning. d) Allows creative assessments to be developed; this takes us back to teacher-led discussions about which form the necessary learning outcomes can be structured for assessment purposes to better enable the engagement of individual learners in the ‘products’ of their learning. (John Davitt’s Learning Events Generator for example.)
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  • Web Quests t
  • The conclusion of this was that socially inclusive e-learning required Tools & Skills rather than any specific learning content that might act as a silver bullet. It was the collaborative affordances of the tools that drove learning.
  • a) the ability to understand how to use their subject for teaching, that is an effective pedagogy 0f b) to understand how to manage the learning environment they are working in and treat each learner as an individual, that is the andragogy of learning relationships c) then having learnt how to manage the learning process related to their subject they then their turned control over to their learners, enabling the heutagogy of creativity to kick in
  • it becomes the Location where we socialise and work. It isn’t just an information resource, nor simply a learning platform, it is also a collaborative work space, where you can hang out with your friends and work at the same time
  • Teachers needed a new skill set if the creative, interactive and participative learning affordances of both dedicated and adapted new learning media were to be realised.
  • But as Web 2.0 emerged the ‘Tools & Skills’ model was driven more by new tools than any fresh thinking about learning.
  • identify new skill sets that enable teachers and learners to deploy the learning affordances that continually emerge from new media technologies.
  • Teachers need to understand a broader skill set related to designing and supporting the learning process as well as their own subject knowledge.
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    Article looking at heutagogic qualities in developing new knowledge.
Dennis OConnor

The Wrath Against Khan: Why Some Educators Are Questioning Khan Academy - 3 views

  • While "technology will replace teachers" seems like a silly argument to make, one need only look at the state of most school budgets and know that something's got to give. And lately, that something looks like teachers' jobs, particularly to those on the receiving end of pink slips. Granted, we haven't implemented a robot army of teachers to replace those expensive human salaries yet (South Korea is working on the robot teacher technology. I'll keep you posted.). But we are laying off teachers in mass numbers. Teachers know their jobs are on the line, something that's incredibly demoralizing for a profession already struggles mightily to retain qualified people.
  • it's hard not to see that wealth as having political not just economic impact. Indeed, the same week that Bill Gates spoke to the Council of Chief State School Officers about ending pay increases for graduate degrees in teaching, Secretary of Education Arne Duncan issued almost the very same statement. What does all of this have to do with Sal Khan? Well, nothing... and everything.
  • One of education historian Diane Ravitch's oft-uttered complaints is that we now have a bunch of billionaires like Gates dictating education policy and education reform, without ever having been classroom teachers themselves (or without having attended public school). But the skepticism about Khan Academy isn't just a matter of wealth or credentials of Khan or his backers. It's a matter of pedagogy.
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  • No doubt, Khan has done something incredible by creating thousands of videos, distributing them online for free, and now designing an analytics dashboard for people to monitor and guide students' movements through the Khan Academy material. And no doubt, lots of people say they've learned a lot by watching the videos. The ability pause, rewind, and replay is often cited as the difference between "getting" the subject matter through classroom instruction and "getting it" via Khan Academy's lecture-demonstrations.
  • Although there's a tech component here that makes this appear innovative, that's really a matter of form, not content, that's new. There's actually very little in the videos that distinguishes Khan from "traditional" teaching. A teacher talks. Students listen. And that's "learning." Repeat over and over again (Pause, rewind, replay in this case). And that's "drilling."
Paul Jinks

Why Reflect? - Reflection for Learning - 3 views

  • What are the pedagogical and physiological foundations of reflection for learning? Why is reflection important for learning? What does the literature say about how reflection supports learning
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    This Google site is focused on reflection. I believe it is work from Helen Barrett. Fine referernce.
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    Looks like a good starting place for an overview of reflective learning, linking back to Dewey, and particularly Kolb.
Dennis OConnor

Three generations of distance education pedagogy | Anderson | The International Review ... - 3 views

  • This paper defines and examines three generations of distance education pedagogy. Unlike earlier classifications of distance education based on the technology used, this analysis focuses on the pedagogy that defines the learning experiences encapsulated in the learning design. The three generations of cognitive-behaviourist, social constructivist, and connectivist pedagogy are examined, using the familiar community of inquiry model (Garrison, Anderson, & Archer, 2000) with its focus on social, cognitive, and teaching presences. Although this typology of pedagogies could also be usefully applied to campus-based education, the need for and practice of openness and explicitness in distance education content and process makes the work especially relevant to distance education designers, teachers, and developers. The article concludes that high-quality distance education exploits all three generations as determined by the learning content, context, and learning expectations.
  • We conclude by arguing that all three current and future generations of DE pedagogy have an important place in a well-rounded educational experience. Connectivism is built on an assumption of a constructivist model of learning, with the learner at the centre, connecting and constructing knowledge in a context that includes not only external networks and groups but also his or her own histories and predilections.
  • t is clear that whether the learner is at the centre or part of a learning community or learning network, learning effectiveness can be greatly enhanced by applying, at a detailed level, an understanding of how people can learn more effectively: Cognitivist, behaviourist, constructivist, and connectivist theories each play an important role. References
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    Cognitive Behaviorism, Constructivism, Connectivism
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    Cognitive Behaviorism, Constructivism, Connectivism
Katie McElhinny

The Problem of "Pedagogy" in a Web 2.0 Era -- Campus Technology - 8 views

  • We need to understand how adults learn and design the undergraduate experience accordingly.
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    By Trent Baston Clearly, we have left the time of knowledge stability and entered a time of incredibly rapid change. Web 2.0, a term coined in 2004, is a description of the new Web architecture, but is also a historical marker between the era of comfortable stability and the era of unsettling change. Many in higher education say we have accordingly turned to learning and away from teaching, but in fact we haven't. Most educators I talk with are unaware of the degree of change necessary today or of the degree to which deep change will continue over the coming decades. And so, the dominant emphasis on teaching remains.
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    As a facilitator more than an instructor, I discovered this article by Trent Baston through the website Campus Technology. Are the members of the E-Learning for Educators community familiar with this website? If so, is it a valuable source of information? Again, as someone new to this area of expertise, I greatly appreciate any feedback the community has regarding some of the issues raised in this article.
eaglejack

Introduction to Crafting Questions for On-line Discussions | Penn State Learning Design... - 13 views

  • ou can investigate how to use questions to achieve specific learning outcomes, guide the discussion process, and provide meaningful feedback to your students.
    • Dennis OConnor
       
      It's important to read through all the hyper-links in this document.  Most will apply directly to building the facilitation and questioning skills needed to be successful online. 
    • anonymous
       
      Great source for online questioning strategies!
  • Would you like to enhance the critical thinking level of your students?
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  • Introduction to Crafting Questions for On-line Discussions
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    Practical ideas for crafting questions for online discussions depending on the desired learning outcome.
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    This resource is used during week 3 of E-Learning for Educators as a guide to creating discussion prompts.
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    Prezi now has an app for the iPad. It's currently a viewer.
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    The Penn State Learning Design Community Hub has done a superb job of providing educators with the necessary background information and examples of effective questions which serve as a point of reference and springboard for implementation in the instructional strategies of online classrooms.
Carol Hartmann

A Critical Look at Constructivist Pedagogy - Kevin Blissett: Out of the Cave - 1 views

  • I actively search out opposing points of view. My best guess, as usual, is that the truth lies somewhere in the middle. That is, I believe that novice learners need substantial guidance but also a decent dose of inquiry. As learners become more mature and establish a suitable context of knowledge and skills, inquiry can begin to take a  more central role in instruction until finally it takes the dominant role.
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    Blog article 5/30/09 titled: A Critical Look at Constructivist Pedagogy present background reading about pros and cons. Kevin's Blogroll and Links offer transformative browsing and reading from a global perspective.
Paul Jinks

Kathy Schrock's Guide for Educators - Assessment Rubrics - Kathy Schrock's Guide for Ed... - 1 views

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    There are some great rubrics here - instead of reinventing the wheel - why not try/customize these?
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    Useful links if you're looking for examples or guidance on rubrics. 
Chris Gamel

Get In The Fracas - 0 views

  • I am very confident that I have the knowledge and skills necessary to enable all of my students to succeed academically. Higher collaboration teachers: 89% Lower collaboration teachers: 81%
  • All or most of my students who have a sense of responsibility for their own education. Higher collaboration teachers: 56% Lower collaboration teachers: 35%
  • Competent teachers
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  • Encouraging assessment and evaluation
  • Significance of education in society
  • The Finns have worked systematically over 35 years to make sure that competent professionals who can craft the best learning conditions for all students are in all schools, rather than thinking that standardized instruction and related testing can be brought in at the last minute to improve student learning and turn around failing schools.
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    Education blog covering the thoughts and musing of Dan Brown, a high school English teacher in Washington DC. Topics vary tend to look at the big picture of education.
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    Education from a high school english teacher's perspective (blog).
Chris Gamel

Improving Public Schools & Public Education | Edutopia - 0 views

  • Who impacts a student's education more –- parents, or teachers?
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    Outstanding resource for educators looking to see what works in public schools.
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    One of the best resources for what works in education.
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