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Dennis OConnor

Copyright and Fair Use | Office of the General Counsel - 0 views

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    "What happens to copyright in cyberspace? Because the electronic environment presents us with new media, and even calls into question the concept of works "fixed" in a "tangible medium," a great many questions challenge the conventions of copyright doctrine. Congress and the courts are struggling to keep up with new technology, and the opinions of scholars and commentators on how the law should cope with these new changes are in lively conflict. Nonetheless, certain principles endure. The first and most important is that there is copyright law in cyberspace. A work that is available electronically-even if it is available only electronically-is as eligible for copyright protection as a work in any other medium. Thus, the fact that you can download text or graphics does not mean that the material is not copyrighted. And the ability to download a copyrighted work does not mean that you are free to disseminate that work to others, either electronically or in hard copy. Those who put their work on the Internet and wish to control its use should use the copyright designation, just as they would do in print or any other medium. You should abide by the following principles when you access a database or other electronic source of information from your own computer. You are free to read, watch or listen to any material to which you have authorized access, even if it is copyrighted. (In some cases you may have to pay a fee to do this.) Because downloading material to your own computer necessarily makes an electronic copy of it, and because printing what you've downloaded makes another copy, a copyright owner is entitled to prohibit downloading and printing. Remember that the site owner is not necessarily the copyright holder of the site's content. A site owner may hold the copyright to some materials but not others, or to none of it. Requests for permission should be directed to the copyright holder, not necessarily the website owner. Look f
Tracy Ndlovu

JOLT - Journal of Online Learning and Teaching - 8 views

  • This article presents important issues for educators to consider as they use these new tools by investigating the ramifications of moving academic activities to a public sphere and examining how laws that govern our academic freedoms and behaviors translate in this new environment. The discussion focuses on concerns specific to incorporating the use of social media and user-generated content into the teaching and learning environment in higher education, touching on compliance with disability and privacy law, intellectual property rights, copyright law, and the fair use exemption
  • Social Media Use in Higher Education: Key Areas to Consider for Educators
  • three important questions will be addressed: 1) What should educators know or consider as they employ these tools? 2) What are the ramifications of moving academic activities to the public sphere? 3) How do laws that govern our academic freedoms and behaviors apply in the online environment?
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  • this reality is one where teachers/educators relinquish some control to embrace the informal leaner-centered pedagogies empowering twenty-first century learners
  • learners can mix and match to best suit their individual learning styles and increase their academic success
  • such technologies are typically freely accessible, easy to incorporate, and have a minimal learning curve to master
  • can become personalized
  • extend class engagement beyond designated class time and to increase the quality and quantity of participation
  • this reality is one where teachers/educators relinquish some control to embrace the informal leaner-centered pedagogies empowering twenty-first century learners
  • this reality is one where teachers/educators relinquish some control to embrace the informal leaner-centered pedagogies empowering twenty-first century learners
  • this reality is one where teachers/educators relinquish some control to embrace the informal leaner-centered pedagogies empowering twenty-first century learners
  • multiple benefits for using SNS [social networking software], including, retention, socialization, collaborative learning, student engagement, sense of control and ownership
  • primary benefit of using the tool is for collaboration or extending engagement outside the classroom
  • faculty attitudes
  • slow-to-adopt-change nature of academia
  • Key Areas of Consideration for Educators
  • Missing from this dialogue, however, is discussion of how best to tackle some of the practical, less paradigm-shifting questions about ownership, privacy and security, access, accessibility and compliance, stability of technology, intellectual property rights, and copyright law.
  • The question really is one of ownership and rights: who owns not only the tangible item that is created, but the intellectual concepts, ideas or processes behind the creative work or property?
  • Increasingly, universities are respecting students’ IP rights, mainly by recognizing them as copyright holders of the work they create.
  • While faculty members may understand that having access to another’s work does not make them owners or give them rights to freely use the content as they wish, this concept may not be so clear for students. Recognizing the ease with which digital content can be copied, remixed, and reused, it is wise to facilitate discussions or assign readings about ownership and attribution, addressing ethical and legal content use.
  • Using mediated tools that capture discussions and activities in an open public space fixes these events for digital perpetuity and makes them potentially available to a world audience.
  • Will this public learning space inhibit risk-taking and instead foster a reluctance to share ideas with a broader audience for fear that these things will come back to haunt the student later?
  • Faculty should consider not only having a discussion about online privacy but also include a statement in their syllabus about proper conduct and expectations for both students and faculty.
  • faculty can use these issues as teaching topics that aim to enhance students’ media literacy.
  • faculty members need to consider a chosen medium’s ability to accommodate students’ diverse learning needs, which include accessibility as defined by the Americans with Disabilities Act
  • the availability of assistive technology tools to enhance accessibility for a wide range of challenges and disabilities seems to have increased
  • Online social media sites create an even more challenging environment as they are rich in media, images, and links facilitating complex interactions that use scripting languages not compatible with accessibility software
  • The most common stability issue for technology is likely the removal of content by the software web host or system provider because of a Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) take-down request
  • If being in a university-sponsored password protected online space that is limited to only the current class has created a fictitious safety net for using copyrighted materials, taking this class out into the open web--a public space available for the world to view--should spark some serious contemplation.
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    "This article presents important issues for educators to consider as they use (Web 2.0) tools by investigating the ramifications of moving academic activities to a public sphere and examining how laws that govern our academic freedoms and behaviors translate in this new environment. The discussion focuses on concerns specific to incorporating the use of social media and user-generated content into the teaching and learning environment in higher education, touching on compliance with disability and privacy law, intellectual property rights, copyright law, and the fair use exemption ..."
Dennis OConnor

Fair Use Teaching Tools | Center for Social Media - 3 views

  • The Center for Social Media has created a set of teaching tools for professors who are interested in teaching their students about fair use. The tools include powerpoints with lecture notes, guidelines for in-class discussions and exercises, assignments and grading rubrics. We hope you'll find them useful!
  • These powerpoints with lecture notes were designed to help professors teach students the basic information they need to understand how to use fair use when making documentary fllms and online videos
  • Fair Use Scenarios: (To be used with the Documentary Filmmakers' Statement of Best Practices in Fair Use) Here are 4 filmmaking scenarios where students are called upon to determine whether they have a fair use right to use certain copyrighted footage, and if there are limits to that right.
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  • Here are two sets of fair use clips for professors to use for in-class discussio
  • Here are guidelines for a short video production assignment that requires students to incorporate copyrighted material into a video and defend the decisions they make using the Code of Best Practices in Online Video.
  • Additionally, here is an assignment, similar to the discussion prompts above, that requires students to articulate why a video clip is fair use.
  • Here is a collection of videos that do a good job of explaining the Codes of Best Practices and the idea of Fair Use:
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    This is a rich source for up to date materials regarding fair use of copyright materials by documentary film makers. Of particular interest is the number of scenarios for classroom instruction. Documentary film makers have pioneered a community understanding of best practices that show the way for higher education in general. This resource has important (and liberating) implications for e-learning and online teaching.
Maureen Haig

Check for Plagiarism On the Web For Free - PlagiarismChecker.com - 0 views

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    Their description: Check Plagiarism On the Internet for Free. Teachers: Find out if your students are cheating. Authors: Find out if people have copied your work. No file uploads required. Report plagiarism to Google or to a teacher.
Maureen Haig

Plagiarism Tutorial - (c) 2005 Center for 21st Century Teaching Excellence - 0 views

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    Excellent tutorial on plagiarism. There's a speaker icon in the top right corner to turn off the music while viewing it.
Dennis OConnor

Code of Best Practices for Fair Use in Media Literacy Education | Media Education Lab - 0 views

  • The Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Media Literacy Education helps educators gain confidence about their rights to use copyrighted materials in developing students' critical thinking and communication skills. 
Kaye Ortman Peters

Copyright and Fair Use - 0 views

  • only quote ten percent of any media exactly
  • Understanding copyright is a professional obligation
  • What information should I include when using copyrighted materials? When using materials from the Internet, the minimum copyright credit should include the copyright symbol, ©; year the material was first published (1894); and the name of the copyright owner (Janice P. Cumquat, Ph.D.).  This is in addition to any other citation information you provide for a reference you might use. (For more on how to create citations, see the IMSA Micro Module: Citation.)
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  • The creator's name may be given at the top or bottom of the page.  It may be dated, indicating that it should not be recreated.
  • There may be a copyright mark, ©
  • 70 years after the death of the last author/creator. 
  • Photographs, clip art, web design, graphs, data tables, audio tracks, music, and movie clips all have implicit copyright proctection...even if they don't display the © copyright symbol!
  • When using materials from the Internet, the minimum copyright credit should include the copyright symbol, �; year the material was first published (1894); and the name of the copyright owner (Janice P. Cumquat, Ph.D.).  This is in addition to any other citation information you provide for a reference you might use. (For more on how to create citations, see the IMSA Micro Module: Citation.)
hkilgallon

Free Technology for Teachers - 1 views

shared by hkilgallon on 16 Dec 08 - Cached
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    A review of free technology resources and how teachers can use them. Ideas for technology integration in education.
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    This site is chock full of information relative to teaching with technology.
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