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Martin Burrett

ACROSTIC POEM MAKER - 3 views

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    Acrostic poetry writing activity
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    A great interactive acrostic poem maker. It explains what acrostic poems are when gives helpful hints as children write their own. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/English
Martin Burrett

Writing Sparks - 16 views

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    "A superb creative writing site to stimulate ideas for opinion pieces, news articles, stories or writings. There is a teachers area with whole class whiteboard resources, and a pupil area where your pupils can write their pieces and print."
Christine Schlitt

Lesson Plans: Name & Word Wall Activities, Building Blocks (Kindergarten, Building Blocks) - 32 views

  • Word Walls and The Name Game Each day we have one person who is our helper and we focus onher name. When everyone has had a turn, we start another round.I find it easiest to go in alphabetical order by first names. I write the students names on sentence strips, using one colorfor boys, and another for girls.First round: We reveal one name each day, beginning with a cheer:?Gimme a B (B), Gimme an i (i), Gimme an l (l), Gimme another l(l), Gimme a y (y). What?s that spell? (Billy). One more time!(Billy). Then I ask if anyone ?notices? anything about Billy?s name andwe look for letters in common with other names, or count lettersand look for other names with the same number of letters. Thenwe take a good look at the student, discussing colors ofclothing, so each child can draw a picture of the helper. Iwrite the helper?s name on the board and encourage everyone totry to write that person?s name and then draw a picture of thehelper. The helper gets to take home the pictures drawn byothers, his is put up on the bulletin board with the name cardI?ve made. 2nd Round: The self-portraits are put into a class book and thename cards are transferred to an alphabet word wall. Each day weread the alphabet and names, then take the helper?s name off tocheer and ?notice? letters about this name and others. We formthe helper?s name in magnetic letters, scramble them up and taketurns putting them in the right order. 3rd Round: When we read the alphabet, we say the sounds inaddition to the letters and names. This time we cheer, writethe letters in the helper?s name on the board and then count howmany of those letters are in the names on the word wall. Thenwe talk about which letter has the most, least, etc. We havealso added another name cheer: ?Bryan, Bryan, that?s his name.It starts with B, it ends with n, hooray, Bryan! We stillscramble the name with magnetic letters. At some point we begin to add sight words to the names on thewall, usually starting with go and we. In December, or after wecome back from Christmas, we take the names off the word walland put them in a pocket chart for the kids to use duringcenters. We continue to add sight words the rest of the year,reading the alphabet, and saying the sounds and words each day. Here are additional name ideas; some I?ve tried, some I haven?t.*Count the syllables.*Write the names like a rainbow.*Name poems from the website Korky?s Kool rhyme machine (http://www.literacyhour.co.uk/learning_activities/rhyme/rhyme.html)*Think of words that begin the same as the name.*Make up tongue twisters.*Fill out an interview sheet.*Mystery person (hangman type game where you draw blanks for theletters and the kids guess letters until they know the name.* Use the letters in the name and look for smaller words. *Cut up name puzzles to keep in a literacy center.*Change the initial consonant and play with the word (Sue, Bue,Lue, etc.).*Another name cheer: No matter what I do or say,My name will always be the same,It starts with_____It ends with ____Now count to 3 and say my name,1,2,3,_______.
    • Christine Schlitt
       
      Name Game Ideas for Kindergarten
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    "Word Walls and The Name Game Each day we have one person who is our helper and we focus on her name. When everyone has had a turn, we start another round. I find it easiest to go in alphabetical order by first names. I write the students names on sentence strips, using one color for boys, and another for girls. First round: We reveal one name each day, beginning with a cheer: ?Gimme a B (B), Gimme an i (i), Gimme an l (l), Gimme another l (l), Gimme a y (y). What?s that spell? (Billy). One more time! (Billy). Then I ask if anyone ?notices? anything about Billy?s name and we look for letters in common with other names, or count letters and look for other names with the same number of letters. Then we take a good look at the student, discussing colors of clothing, so each child can draw a picture of the helper. I write the helper?s name on the board and encourage everyone to try to write that person?s name and then draw a picture of the helper. The helper gets to take home the pictures drawn by others, his is put up on the bulletin board with the name card I?ve made. 2nd Round: The self-portraits are put into a class book and the name cards are transferred to an alphabet word wall. Each day we read the alphabet and names, then take the helper?s name off to cheer and ?notice? letters about this name and others. We form the helper?s name in magnetic letters, scramble them up and take turns putting them in the right order. 3rd Round: When we read the alphabet, we say the sounds in addition to the letters and names. This time we cheer, write the letters in the helper?s name on the board and then count how many of those letters are in the names on the word wall. Then we talk about which letter has the most, least, etc. We"
Martin Burrett

Children's Poetry Archive - 88 views

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    A great poetry site for children. See poems on a range of topics and most poems have an audio of the poet reading their poems. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/English
Martin Burrett

ThumbScribes - 112 views

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    This is a great site for encouraging writers to create stories, poems and songs collaboratively. The site limits how much a user can write and can invite friends or the public to continue and edit a piece of poem. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/English
Mark Gleeson

Writing Ballad Writings through ICT tools - 59 views

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    An outline of an upcoming unit on writing Ballad Poetry as a Narrative form using Edmodo and other Web 2.0 tools for writing collaboration
Clint Heitz

Anatomy of a slam: "there will be poems" - 3 views

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    How to put together and promote a poetry slam. Includes ideas and examples.
N Carroll

Shadow Poetry -- Resources -- Types of Poetry - 6 views

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    This page contains all types of poetry - gives the definition of they type of poem; the set up; and several examples.
Martin Burrett

http://ettcweb.lr.k12.nj.us/forms/poemlist.htm - 73 views

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    Until your students are ready to use their own artistic licence you may want to use this poem template site to get them started. Just input words as prompted to make intriguing poetry. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/English
Jenny Gough

An Introduction to Inquiry-Based Learning - 122 views

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    "What kinds of questions make for good inquiry-based projects? As we said, they must first be questions that the kids truly care about because they come up with them themselves. In addition, good questions share the following characteristics: The questions must be answerable. "What is the poem 'Dream Deferred' based on?" is answerable. "Why did Langston Hughes write it?" may be answerable if such information exists, or if the students have some relevant and defensible opinions. "Why did he choose this particular word in line six?" is not answerable because the only person likely to know such a specific answer is Hughes himself, now deceased. The answer cannot be a simple fact. "In what year was Lincoln killed?" doesn't make for a very compelling project because you can just look it up in any number of books or Web sites. "What factors caused the assassination attempt?" might be a good project because it will require research, interpretation, and analysis. The answer can't already be known. "What is hip-hop music?" is a bit too straightforward and the kids are not likely to learn much more than they know already. "What musical styles does hip-hop draw from and how?" offers more opportunity for exploration. The questions must have some objective basis for an answer. "Why is the sky blue?" can be answered through research. "Why did God make the sky blue?" cannot because it is a faith-based question. Both are meaningful, valid, real questions, but the latter isn't appropriate for an inquiry-based project. "What have people said about why God made the sky blue?" might be appropriate. Likewise, "Why did the dinosaurs become extinct?" is ultimately unanswerable in that form because no humans were around to know for sure, but "What do scientists believe was the reason for their extinction?" or "What does the evidence suggest about the cause?" will work. Questions based on value judgments don't work for similar reasons. You can't objectively answer "Is Hamle
Josh Flores

Common Core Curriculum Maps | - 215 views

    • Josh Flores
       
      Rote Memorization? Don't they know that's a Lower Order Thinking Skill? 
    • Josh Flores
       
      Writing an original Writing could have the same effect. 
  • Moreover, once students have memorized a poem, they are able to carry it with them everywhere. It becomes part of their lives.
  • ...4 more annotations...
  • Seminar discussions
    • Josh Flores
       
      Substantive Conversation Socratic Seminar Think-Pair-Share
  • research essays
    • Josh Flores
       
      Good use of EasyBib premium account's notebook feature
Roland Gesthuizen

Engineering the Perfect Poem by Using the Vocabulary of STEM - ReadWriteThink - 7 views

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    "Engineering is the "silent E" in STEM subject areas. While science, mathematics, and technology are often topics of content area lessons, engineering is often ignored. However, engineering is inclusive of all STEM subjects because engineers use science, mathematics, and technology to solve problems. Engineering careers are diverse, spanning many different technologies and disciplines, such as agricultural engineering, aerospace engineering, computer engineering, mechanical engineering, and chemical engineering."
Mary Beth  Messner

5 Fantastic Ways to Use Wallwisher in the Classroom - SimpleK12 - 138 views

  • 5 fantastic ways to use Wallwisher in the classroom: Writing activities – Wallwisher has a 160 character limit for each comment/post that you leave on the wall. Which is, in a way, a good thing! It allows for short story/collaborative projects, essay plans, note-taking, memos, Writings, etc… the Writing possibilities are endless! Brainstorming activities – This is a great ice breaker for the beginning of class! And better yet, it’s a great way to post a homework assignment/food for thought for that evening and then discuss it the next day. Vocabulary/Grammar Activities – You could easily use Wallwisher for practicing tenses, definitions, vocabulary matching (you can even use audio or video!), or even find a theme and have the students fill the sticky notes with their ideas for the vocabulary theme! Speaking activities – I was never one to love speaking in front of people so Wallwisher is a great way to create short speaking activities to help students feel more comfortable in front of a group of people. These activities could be to talk about a photo or video for X minutes, create a story based upon X number of photos, or even put debate topics on a sticky note for the student to create. Notifications – That is the original thought, right? You could use Wallwisher for orientation information, classroom rules, student profiles, daily/weekly plan, or even fun messages to other students who might be out sick or on trips with their families.
Darcy Goshorn

Creating Remarkable Poetry Through Subtraction - 103 views

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    Great, efficient way to teach one way to write poetry
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    Awesome activity! Interesting to teach in so many contexts: poetry, economy of words, even censorship - a different take on it. Also meshes perfectly with the novel catch 22 and Yosarrian censoring the letters.
Martin Burrett

Poetry Idea Engine - 154 views

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    An English resource that takes students through writing four different types of poetry. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/English
Lucas Cittadino

About PenCamp - 3 views

  • PenCamp is a really fast way to quickly build a basic web page. Its perfect for writing and sharing stories, jokes, writings and more.Building a page requires no special skills. You just click the text and edit it. Of course, if you're a more advanced user, you can also add HTML.
Martin Burrett

Concrete Poetry - 111 views

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    This is a clever visual poetry tool for young children where you can draw an outline and place words inside. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/English
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