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Kelly Boushell

Word Workshop - 57 views

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    create your own word wall cards or labels by Scholastic Word Workshop
Martin Burrett

What 3 Words - 78 views

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    An intriguing site which has split the whole world into 3 metre by 3 metre squares and assigned 3 words to label that coordinate, giving addresses to millions around the world who don't have an official address, or making a meeting point more accuracy than a postcode. For educators, there are lots of geographic and literacy possibilities - geocaching with spelling, or writing short stories or descriptions about a real location including the words. The site can be viewed in many different European languages meaning there are MFL possibilities too."
taconi12

Fractions- Ideas for Teaching, Resources for Lesson Plans, and Activities for Unit Planning - 3 views

  • raction Hunt Posted by:lismac #130700 Please Signin We walked around the school in small groups armed with cameras and looked for fractions occuring in our school. Each child had to find one scene to capture with the camera. Another group stayed in the classroom and created their fractions with classroom materials. Example- 10 pencils. 9 were yellow and one was red. Then the small groups would come to our computer and insert their picture. Each child then inserted text boxes to type in the fractions. Example- 9/10 of the pencils are yellow. 1/10 of the pencils are red. 9/10 + 1/10= 10/10 They could choose the fonts and colors and such... they used word art to add their names. They loved it! We also do one using multiplication.
  • Fraction Hunt Posted by:lismac #130700 Please Signin We walked around the school in small groups armed with cameras and looked for fractions occuring in our school. Each child had to find one scene to capture with the camera. Another group stayed in the classroom and created their fractions with classroom materials. Example- 10 pencils. 9 were yellow and one was red. Then the small groups would come to our computer and insert their picture. Each child then inserted text boxes to type in the fractions. Example- 9/10 of the pencils are yellow. 1/10 of the pencils are red. 9/10 + 1/10= 10/10 They could choose the fonts and colors and such... they used word art to add their names. They loved it! We also do one using multiplication.
  • One activity that went over pretty well with my class was putting fractions in order. After completing a lesson on comparing fractions, each student was given a fraction on a 3x5 card and asked to tape it to their chest. Then they were instructed to line up in order from greatest to least. After they had completed the task, after much deliberation, I informed them of the correct order. They did pretty well considering there were fifteen students.
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  • Another thing I did was draw fractions number lines (about seven inches long) on a piece of paper, one under another with enough space between lines so my students could label the points. The first line was not divided. The points were labeled 0 and 1. The second line was divided into halves. The students labeled the points on the line 0/2, 1/2, and 2/2. The third line was divided into thirds. The students labeled the points 0/3, 1/3, 2/3, 3/3. You probably get the idea. The remaining lines were divided into fourths, fifths, sixths, eighths, tenths, and twelfths, and the points were labeled. (It is very...
  • Well, you are not alone. Fractions lessons sometimes need repeating over and over until they understand the CONCEPTS. Try giving them a mnemonic device to help them remember what to do. My kids decided to use GCF as Greatest Calories n Fat so that's why you REDUCE!! This just helped them to know when to use the GCF but it still needs lots of practice. Also, do a lot of hands-on activities that show equivalency in fractions. Make fraction strips using construction paper, and the kids can show all the equivalent fractions by matching up the strips. Or try the pizza fraction pieces that you can buy. I believe that it just takes lots of fun practice as well as drills on the procedures. Take your time and don't rush through it or you'll be sorry to see that they won't remember any of it by Christmas!!
  • I created an interactive fraction number line from 0 to 2 on my wall. I have about 40 fraction cards with different fractions and I have students take turns putting the cards on the number line. They get the chance to see that some of the fractions are equivelent to others.
  • Make up index cards before hand. Group them in 3's (.25 on one card, 1/4 on another, 25% on the third) make up however many sets of three you need to give a card to each of the students in your class. Once the cards have been shuffled, pass one to each student. Have them find their 'family' WITHOUT MAKING A SOUND. When .20, 1/5 and 20% find each other they have to put their cards on a large number line in the front of the class. It's a great way to get them all involved, and gets them up and around the classroom.
  • I also have my student play Fraction Tic Tac Toe, on a 4 x 4 grid filled with halves, fourths, and eighths. They have to make a whole with 3 fractions in a row. They love it!!! I'm not sure where the gamesheet come from, but I am sure you can make your own.
Carol Ansel

The Daring Librarian: Wikipedia is not wicked! - The Answer Sheet - The Washington Post - 70 views

  • Teaching Wikipedia in 5 Easy Steps: *Use it as background information *Use it for technology terms *Use it for current pop cultural literacy *Use it for the Keywords *Use it for the REFERENCES at the bottom of the page!
  • 4 ways to use Wikipedia (hint: never cite it) Teachers: Please stop prohibiting the use of Wikipedia 20 Little Known Ways to Use Wikipedia Study: Wikipedia as accurate as Encyclopedia Britannica Schiff, Stacy. “Know it all: Can Wikipedia conquer expertise?” The New Yorker, February 26, 2006 And: Yes students, there’s a world beyond Wikipedia **Several years ago, Nature magazine did a comparison of material available on Wikipedia and Brittanica and concluded that Brittanica was somewhat, but not overwhelmingly, more accurate than Wikipedia. Brittanica lodged a complaint, and here, you can see what it complained about as well as Nature’s response. Nature compared articles from both organizations on various topics and sent them to experts to review. Per article, the averages were: 2.92 mistakes per article for Britannica and 3.86 for Wikipedia. -0- Follow The Answer Sheet every day by bookmarking http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/answer-sheet. And for admissions advice, college news and links to campus papers, please check out our Higher Education page. Bookmark it! var entrycat = ' ' By Valerie Strauss  |  05:00 AM ET, 09/07/2011 .connect_widget .connect_widget_text .connect_widget_connected_text a {display:block;} #center {overflow:visible;} /*.override-width iframe {width:274px !important;}*/ Tumblr Reddit Stumbleupon Digg Delicious LinkedIn http://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.html#_=1315504289567&count=horizontal&counturl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.washingtonpost.com%2Fblogs%2Fanswer-sheet%2Fpost%2F
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    Excellent perspective on "The 'W' Word" - use it wisely for what it is - high school and college kids shouldn't be citing any general knowledge encyclopedias for serious research - but that doesn't mean there aren't some excellent uses for it.
Deborah Batzer

Science Vocabulary Hangman Game - 73 views

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    Learn scientific words,terms and vocabulary while playing a game of hangman!">Science Vocabulary Hangman Game
BalancEd Tech

TPaCK WebQuest - BalancEdTech - 4 views

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    At several of our previous meetings we have used a "Prensky Scale" to examine lessons/projects. It's time to kick that up a notch with the TPaCK framework which helps educators label the knowledge a teacher needs to teach. Though the three knowledge bases of Technological Knowledge, Pedagogical Knowledge, and Content Knowledge are easy for teachers to grasp, the interplay of them is often subtle and distinctions can be hard to see at first. This WebQuest is designed to first familiarize you with the TPaCK framework, then to examine and discuss examples that combine the three bases to different degrees and success, and finally to help you define the areas of interplay in your own words.
Thomas Anderson

ClassroomBasics - 85 views

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    A superb webpage of beautifully designed classroom basics displays, labels and posters of class resources, the alphabet and labels, weather and lots more. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/Displays+%26+Posters
jariza67

Letter_Birmingham_Jail(1).pdf - 21 views

shared by jariza67 on 03 Feb 16 - No Cached
  • Martin Luther King, Jr.
    • jariza67
       
      Martin Luther King Jr. is BOTH a Reverend (priest) AND a Doctor of Theology (study of religion) at this time in his life.
  • From the Birmingham jail, where he was imprisoned as a participant in nonviolent demonstrations against segregation, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., wrote in longhand the letter which follows.
    • jariza67
       
      QUESTION: Why was Dr. King sent to jail? What law(s) did he break?
  • Jr., wrote in longhand the letter which follows. It was his response to a public statement of concern and caution issued by eig
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  • It was his response to a public statement of concern and caution issued by eight white religious leaders of the South.
    • jariza67
       
      QUESTION: Why were the 8 religious leaders angry at Dr. King?
  • nwise and untimely
  • WHILE confined here in the Birmingham city jail, I came across your recent statement calling our present activities "unwise and untimely."
    • jariza67
       
      Dr. King starts off his letter by addressing his critics in the opening of his letter. QUESTION: WHY DOES KING ADDRESS HIS CRITICS IN THIS MANNER? ("My Dear Fellow Clergymen:")
  • "unwise and untimely."
    • jariza67
       
      QUESTION: Why do the 8 white priests think King's protests are "unwise and untimely?" QUESTION: Why does King refer to this in his letter?
  • unwise
  • unwise
  • unwise
  • unwise
  • ctive
  • I would like to answer your statement in what I hope will be patient and reasonable terms.
    • jariza67
       
      QUESTION: How has King set up his defense?
  • you are men of genuine good will
    • jariza67
       
      QUESTION: What are King's reasons for this remark?
  • "outsiders coming in."
    • jariza67
       
      QUESTION: Why is King considered an outsider?
  • I am here because I have basic organizational ties here.
    • jariza67
       
      DISCUSSION QUESTIONS (REVIEW Para. 1-2) 1. How does King begin the letter? 2. What is the impact of King's word choices? 3. HOW DO SPECIFIC WORDS AND PHRASES CONTRIBUTE TO THE IMPACT OF KING'S OPENING? 4. What are King's reasons for being in Birmingham?
  • carried
    • jariza67
       
      VOCABULARY: 5. consented (v.) - permitted, approved, or agreed.
    • jariza67
       
      VOCABULARY: sought (v.) - tried or attempted
    • jariza67
       
      VOCABULARY: 4. untimely (adj.) - happening too soon or too early.
    • jariza67
       
      "My Dear Fellow Clergymen:" (Mr. Ariza's note) Dr. King originally addresses his famous "Letter From A Birmingham Jail" to 8 Alabama clergymen (priests) who (in a local newspaper ad) criticized King's protests and demonstrations, while also labeling King as "a law-breaker." With no paper in his jail cell, King used the margins of this newspaper to write his Famous reply to their criticisms of him. KING'S LETTER (written in August 1963) is what brought the world's attention to our country's problems with segregation and racism.
    • jariza67
       
      VOCABULARY: 6. Seldom (adj.) on only a few occasions; rarely, not often.
    • jariza67
       
      VOCABULARY: 1: fellow (adj.) -belonging to the same class or group; united by the same occupation, interests, etc.).
    • jariza67
       
      VOCABULARY: 2. clergymen (n.) - religious leaders
    • jariza67
       
      VOCABULARY: 3. confined (adj.) - unable to leave a place because of illness, imprisonment, etc.
    • jariza67
       
      LINK FOR THE ORIGINAL LETTER WRITTEN TO KING BY THE 8 WHITE CLERGYMEN http://www.massresistance.org/docs/gen/09a/mlk_day/statement.html
    • jariza67
       
      VOCABULARY: Consented (v.) - permitted, approved, or agreed
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    Letter From a Birmingham Jail full text pdf w ANNOTATIONS Mr. Ariza/ Ms. Bozeman AUGUST MARTIN HS
Linda Hoff

Alphabetimals | Fun Animal Alphabet Game, Personalized Baby & Toddler Gifts, Free Coloring Book, Poster, and Flash Cards - 119 views

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    A cute online animal alphabet book for very young learners. See a animated letter shaped animal with sounds for the whole alphabet. You can even write words with these animal letters, making this a good resource for making interesting name words. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/English
Andrew McCluskey

Occupy Your Brain - 111 views

  • One of the most profound changes that occurs when modern schooling is introduced into traditional societies around the world is a radical shift in the locus of power and control over learning from children, families, and communities to ever more centralized systems of authority.
  • Once learning is institutionalized under a central authority, both freedom for the individual and respect for the local are radically curtailed.  The child in a classroom generally finds herself in a situation where she may not move, speak, laugh, sing, eat, drink, read, think her own thoughts, or even  use the toilet without explicit permission from an authority figure.
  • In what should be considered a chilling development, there are murmurings of the idea of creating global standards for education – in other words, the creation of a single centralized authority dictating what every child on the planet must learn.
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  • In “developed” societies, we are so accustomed to centralized control over learning that it has become functionally invisible to us, and most people accept it as natural, inevitable, and consistent with the principles of freedom and democracy.   We assume that this central authority, because it is associated with something that seems like an unequivocal good – “education” – must itself be fundamentally good, a sort of benevolent dictatorship of the intellect. 
  • We endorse strict legal codes which render this process compulsory, and in a truly Orwellian twist, many of us now view it as a fundamental human right to be legally compelled to learn what a higher authority tells us to learn.
  • And yet the idea of centrally-controlled education is as problematic as the idea of centrally-controlled media – and for exactly the same reasons.
  • The First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution was designed to protect all forms of communication, information-sharing, knowledge, opinion and belief – what the Supreme Court has termed “the sphere of intellect and spirit” – from government control.
  • by the mid-19th century, with Indians still to conquer and waves of immigrants to assimilate, the temptation to find a way to manage the minds of an increasingly diverse and independent-minded population became too great to resist, and the idea of the Common School was born.
  • We would keep our freedom of speech and press, but first we would all be well-schooled by those in power.
  • A deeply democratic idea — the free and equal education of every child — was wedded to a deeply anti-democratic idea — that this education would be controlled from the top down by state-appointed educrats.
  • The fundamental point of the Occupy Wall Street movement is that the apparatus of democratic government has been completely bought and paid for by a tiny number of grotesquely wealthy individuals, corporations, and lobbying groups.  Our votes no longer matter.  Our wishes no longer count.  Our power as citizens has been sold to the highest bidder.
  • Our kids are so drowned in disconnected information that it becomes quite random what they do and don’t remember, and they’re so overburdened with endless homework and tests that they have little time or energy to pay attention to what’s happening in the world around them.
  • If in ten years we can create Wikipedia out of thin air, what could we create if we trusted our children, our teachers, our parents, our neighbors, to generate community learning webs that are open, alive, and responsive to individual needs and aspirations?  What could we create if instead of trying to “scale up” every innovation into a monolithic bureaucracy we “scaled down” to allow local and individual control, freedom, experimentation, and diversity?
  • The most academically “gifted” students excel at obedience, instinctively shaping their thinking to the prescribed curriculum and unconsciously framing out of their awareness ideas that won’t earn the praise of their superiors.  Those who resist sitting still for this process are marginalized, labeled as less intelligent or even as mildly brain-damaged, and, increasingly, drugged into compliance.
  • the very root, the very essence, of any theory of democratic liberty is a basic trust in the fundamental intelligence of the ordinary person.   Democracy rests on the premise that the ordinary person — the waitress, the carpenter, the shopkeeper — is competent to make her own judgments about matters of domestic policy, international affairs, taxes, justice, peace, and war, and that the government must abide by the decisions of ordinary people, not vice versa.  Of course that’s not the way our system really works, and never has been.   But most of us recall at some deep level of our beings that any vision of a just world relies on this fundamental respect for the common sense of the ordinary human being.
  • This is what we spend our childhood in school unlearning. 
  • If before we reach the age of majority we must submit our brains for twelve years of evaluation and control by government experts, are we then truly free to exercise our vote according to the dictates of our own common sense and conscience?  Do we even know what our own common sense is anymore?
  • We live in a country where a serious candidate for the Presidency is unaware that China has nuclear weapons, where half the population does not understand that Saddam Hussein had nothing to do with 9/11, where nobody pays attention as Congress dismantles the securities regulations that limit the power of the banks, where 45% of American high school students graduate without knowing that the First Amendment of the Constitution guarantees freedom of the press.   At what point do we begin to ask ourselves if we are trying to control quality in the wrong way?
  • Human beings, collaborating with one another in voluntary relationships, communicating and checking and counter-checking and elaborating and expanding on one another’s knowledge and intelligence, have created a collective public resource more vast and more alive than anything that has ever existed on the planet.
  • But this is not a paeon to technology; this is about what human intelligence is capable of when people are free to interact in open, horizontal, non-hierarchical networks of communication and collaboration.
  • Positive social change has occurred not through top-down, hierarchically controlled organizations, but through what the Berkana Institute calls “emergence,” where people begin networking and forming voluntary communities of practice. When the goal is to maximize the functioning of human intelligence, you need to activate the unique skills, talents, and knowledge bases of diverse individuals, not put everybody through a uniform mill to produce uniform results. 
  • You need a non-punitive structure that encourages collaboration rather than competition, risk-taking rather than mistake-avoidance, and innovation rather than repetition of known quantities.
  • if we really want to return power to the 99% in a lasting, stable, sustainable way, we need to begin the work of creating open, egalitarian, horizontal networks of learning in our communities.
  • They are taught to focus on competing with each other and gaming the system rather than on gaining a deep understanding of the way power flows through their world.
  • And what could we create, what ecological problems could we solve, what despair might we alleviate, if instead of imposing our rigid curriculum and the destructive economy it serves on the entire world, we embraced as part of our vast collective intelligence the wisdom and knowledge of the world’s thousands of sustainable indigenous cultures?
  • They knew this about their situation: nobody was on their side.  Certainly not the moneyed classes and the economic system, and not the government, either.  So if they were going to change anything, it had to come out of themselves.
  • As our climate heats up, as mountaintops are removed from Orissa to West Virginia, as the oceans fill with plastic and soils become too contaminated to grow food, as the economy crumbles and children go hungry and the 0.001% grows so concentrated, so powerful, so wealthy that democracy becomes impossible, it’s time to ask ourselves; who’s educating us?  To what end?  The Adivasis are occupying their forests and mountains as our children are occupying our cities and parks.  But they understand that the first thing they must take back is their common sense. 
  • They must occupy their brains.
  • Isn’t it time for us to do the same?
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    Carol Black, creator of the documentary, "Schooling the World" discusses the conflicting ideas of centralized control of education and standardization against the so-called freedom to think independently--"what the Supreme Court has termed 'the sphere of intellect and spirit" (Black, 2012). Root questions: "who's educating us? to what end?" (Black, 2012).
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    This is a must read. Carol Black echoes here many of the ideas of Paulo Freire, John Taylor Gatto and the like.
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