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Lisa C. Hurst

Inside the School Silicon Valley Thinks Will Save Education | WIRED - 9 views

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    "AUTHOR: ISSIE LAPOWSKY. ISSIE LAPOWSKY DATE OF PUBLICATION: 05.04.15. 05.04.15 TIME OF PUBLICATION: 7:00 AM. 7:00 AM INSIDE THE SCHOOL SILICON VALLEY THINKS WILL SAVE EDUCATION Click to Open Overlay Gallery Students in the youngest class at the Fort Mason AltSchool help their teacher, Jennifer Aguilar, compile a list of what they know and what they want to know about butterflies. CHRISTIE HEMM KLOK/WIRED SO YOU'RE A parent, thinking about sending your 7-year-old to this rogue startup of a school you heard about from your friend's neighbor's sister. It's prospective parent information day, and you make the trek to San Francisco's South of Market neighborhood. You walk up to the second floor of the school, file into a glass-walled conference room overlooking a classroom, and take a seat alongside dozens of other parents who, like you, feel that public schools-with their endless bubble-filled tests, 38-kid classrooms, and antiquated approach to learning-just aren't cutting it. At the same time, you're thinking: this school is kind of weird. On one side of the glass is a cheery little scene, with two teachers leading two different middle school lessons on opposite ends of the room. But on the other side is something altogether unusual: an airy and open office with vaulted ceilings, sunlight streaming onto low-slung couches, and rows of hoodie-wearing employees typing away on their computers while munching on free snacks from the kitchen. And while you can't quite be sure, you think that might be a robot on wheels roaming about. Then there's the guy who's standing at the front of the conference room, the school's founder. Dressed in the San Francisco standard issue t-shirt and jeans, he's unlike any school administrator you've ever met. But the more he talks about how this school uses technology to enhance and individualize education, the more you start to like what he has to say. And so, if you are truly fed up with the school stat
Kimberly LaPrairie

picturing the thirties - 2 views

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    "Picturing the 1930s," a new educational web site created by the Smithsonian American Art Museum in collaboration with the University of Virginia, allows teachers and students to explore the 1930s through paintings, Artist memorabilia, historical documents, newsreels, period photographs, music, and Art. Using PrimaryAccess, a web-based teaching tool developed at the university's Curry Center for Technology and Teacher Education, visitors can select images, write text, and record narration in the style of a documentary filmmaker. They can then screen their Art in a virtual theater. PrimaryAccess is the first online tool that allows students to combine their own text, historical images from primary sources, and audio narration to create short online documentary films linked to social studies standards of learning, said Glen Bull, co-director of the Curry Center. Since the first version was developed in collaboration with U.Va.'s Center for Digital Art and piloted in a local elementary school in 2005, more than 9,000 users worldwide have created more than 20,000 short movies. In creating digital documentaries, students embed facts and events in a narrative context that can enhance their retention and understanding of the material, said Curry research scientist Bill Ferster, who developed the application with Bull. Besides increasing their knowledge about the period, "Picturing the 1930s" enhances students' visual literacy skills, Ferster noted, adding that PrimaryAccess "offers teachers another tool to bring Art alive."
Michele Brown

Amor Sciendi - YouTube - 3 views

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    Videos connecting Video with Video, science, math and more.  Youtube Next EDU Guru
Martin Burrett

O2 learn - Educational video bank - 84 views

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    A good education video sharing site. Watch hundreds of teacher submitted videos on subjects across the curriculum. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/video,+animation,+film+&+Webcams
Martin Burrett

Teaching Videos - 178 views

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    A collection of cross curricular videos for teachers to use in class. The videos are sourced from many sites, including YouTube, Teacher.tv and many more. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/video%2C+animation%2C+film+%26+Webcams
Martin Burrett

West Baton Rouge Parish Schools - 26 views

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    A useful and fun set of cross-curriculum photo slide shows for maths, English, science, history and more. They are arranged by age and range from kinderghistoryen Secondary school. A great resource for introducing topics. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/history%2C+animation%2C+film+%26+Webcams
Jeff Kinney

Retro Videos: Free Classroom and Homeschool Educational films & Videos for Science, Social Studies, Video, Music, Geography, Teachers - 4 views

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    Old classroom videos (filmstrips)
Martin Burrett

Cosmo Learning - 65 views

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    A superb site with a large amount of lecture videos for college students and teachers. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/video%2C+animation%2C+film+%26+Webcams
Brandon Raymo

YTTM.tv - Pick a year, click refresh, and TRAVEL THROUGH TIME. - 16 views

shared by Brandon Raymo on 20 Sep 12 - No Cached
Jane Boarman liked it
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    This site is amazing! You have to try it because I can't explain it well enough to do it justice. Super cool! A great resource for history/social studies classes or English Language historys/Reading classes to put a book time period into perspective for students. Select a year and view historys from that year. You can select sports, history games, commercials, current events, television, movies, and music from that specific year. 
Thieme Hennis

530 Free Online Courses from Top Universities | Open Culture - 88 views

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    Bookmark our collection of free online Economics courses. And find free econ textbooks in our Free Textbook collection. Bookmark our collection of free online History courses. To stHistory learning 40 foreign languages, please see our extensive collection called Learn Languages for Free. You can download or stream free lessons in French, Spanish, English, German, Mandarin, Italian and more.
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    over 500 free online courses
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    "Get free online courses from the world's leading universities. This collection includes over 530 free courses in the liberal arts and sciences. Download these audio & art courses straight to your computer or mp3 player."
dabennett7

Remix Culture : Center for Social Innovation (CSI) - 12 views

  • there’s a war raging over what some now are calling a new art form in the emerging Web 2.0 culture—remix
  • remix is collage, a recombination of existing, reference images or music and video clips from popular digital culture, elements of which are mashed up into something new.
    • dabennett7
       
      Does this sound familiar? Common core and even the SBAC assessment are rooted in remix.
  • as long as the remix is significantly altered from the original—should remix be permitted by law
    • dabennett7
       
      How will copryright laws evolve for the 21st century? What skills must our students gradate with to prepare them for a world of Remix vs. Copyrights?
  • ...7 more annotations...
  • Should remix be outlawed as a violation of an artist’s or photographer’s copyrigh
  • “Remix is literacy in the 21st century,” Lessig said. The chief of Stanford University’s Center for Internet and Society
    • dabennett7
       
      If digital literacy includes remixing, then the skills of citation and attribution are more important than ever.
  • Johnson, author of The Invention of Air, a new book about the history of information flows in American and British society, said remix has “deep roots in the Age of Enlightenment and among America’s Founding Fathers.”
    • dabennett7
       
      Remix is not new...  but it is easier and more accessible than ever.  A smartphone alone is a remix machine capable of remixing text, audio, art, images and more.  Then with a click you can publish your remix to the world from anywhere!
  • failing to legally protect remixes as original forms of art and expression “will make pirates of our children...We cannot kill this form of expression;
  • Where do we think innovation and creativity come from
  • Fairey rounded out the talk, citing remix as one of the early 21st century’s most popular forms of free political expression.
  • Remix is all about making references; references are how you establish a point of view in popular culture, and they are crucial to my work as an artist.”
    • dabennett7
       
      This is what we as educators are all about... We challenge students to make connections, identify themes, clarify or argue a point of view.  We push them to remix everyday. Are we challenging them to respect the ideas they build their learning upon?
Tracy Tuten

Tech Learning TL Advisor Blog and Ed Tech Ticker Blogs from TL Blog Staff - TechLearning.com - 60 views

  • Mixbook (or Mixbook for Educators) is a photo-based creation platform that offers hundreds of layouts and backgrounds to choose from along with customizable frames and text to make your book beautiful. Just pick a layout, drag-and-drop your photos into the photo slots, and edit to your heart's content.
  • Though the site's examples suggest using the books to gather wedding, travel, and baby albums, this program can absolutely used to create stories around historic photographs and artifacts, original art, to produce a class yearbook, to share an oral or personal art or journey, to tell the story of a field trip.  Mixbook for Educators now offers a secure collaborative environment for sharing their ebooks, as well as discounts on printed products, should you choose to print.  (A similar option is Scrapblog.)
  • Storybird, a collaborative storybook building space designed for ages 3-13, inspires young writers to create text around the work of professional artists and the collection of art is growing. Two (or more) people create a Storybird in a round robin fashion by writing their own text and inserting pictures. They then have the option of sharing their Storybird privately or publicly on the network. The final product can be printed (soon), watched on screen, played with like a toy, or shared through a worldwide library. Storybird is also a simple publishing platform for writers and artists that allows them to experiment, publish their stories, and connect with their fans.
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  • Myth and Legend Creator 2 shares a collection of traditional stories from England and around the world to hear and read. The site offers historical context for each story, story time lines and maps, ideas for use of the story in the classroom, and student work inspired by the story.  The Story Creator--with its libraries of backgrounds, characters, props, text bubbles, sound and video recording tools, and options to upload--provides students easy opportunities to create their own versions of traditional stories.
  • The Historic Tale Construction Kit is similar in that it helps students construct stories around a theme, in this case stories set in the middle ages with movable, scalable beasts, folks, braves, buildings. and old-style text.
  • Tikatok is a platform devoted to kid book publishing at a variety of levels.  Children have the option of exploring a collection of interactive story templates called StorySparks prompts, personalizing an existing book with their own names in Books2Go, with their own names, or starting from scratch in Create Your Own Book. Tikatok’s Classroom Program allows teachers to share lesson plans, view and edit students' work online, encourage collaboration, and track writing progress.
  • Big Universe is both an online library and a publishing and sharing community for grades K through 8.  Using Big Universe Author, students may create, research, and collaborate on books using a library of more than 7000 images and interactive tools.
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    Digital publishing tools for creating story books
Deborah Baillesderr

CommonLit | Free Fiction & Nonfiction Literacy Resources, Curriculum, & Assessment Materials for Middle & High School English Language Arts - 53 views

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    Great resource for CCSS-ELA. This site is geared for grades 5-12. The library is full of informational and literature text that can be found by lexile range, grade level, theme, genres, device or standards. You have the ability to get paired text, related media (videos), a teacher guide, and a parent guide. Assessment and discussion questions are included that asked students to prove their answers using passages from the text. Truly worth checking out.
Martin Burrett

winged sandals - 97 views

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    An amazing flash resource for learning about the ancient Greeks with animated videos of myths and main Gods.
Karen Balnis

Another Look at the Weaknesses of Online Learning - Innovations - The Chronicle of Higher Education - 86 views

shared by Karen Balnis on 28 Jul 11 - No Cached
  • have been lucky enough to have taught the full range of our freshman / sophmore undergraduate offerings as both an onsite and online instructor. While I have thoroughly enjoyed both formats - and very much so - I must admit that my experiences online have been *much* more positive than onsite instruction. Let me try and elucidate:1. While in the onsite classroom you have the opportunity to think on your feet and challenge and be experiential on your feet to reactions to the students who speak, in the online classroom, you are able to meet *every* class member and challenge their minds and ideas. The students who would normally be lost in a classroom of 35-40 are met and developed each day or week at their level and pushed to consider ideas they might not have considered. 2. I am able to reach the entire class through multimedia exhibits in each of the weekly units - journal articles, non-copyrighted film clips (and many from our university's purchased collection under an agreement for both onsite classroom and online classroom use), photography, art, patents, etc, that the students would not see - or would otherwise ignore - in an onsite classroom. We incorporate this information into our discussions and make it part of the larger whole of art.3. Each student and I - on the phone during office hours or in e-mail - discuss the creation of their term papers - and discuss midterm and final "anxiety" issues - and as they are used to the online format, and regular communication with me through the discussion boards, they respond much more readily than onsite students, whom I have found I have to pressure to talk to me. 4. I am able to accommodate students from around the country - and around the world. I have had enrolled in my class students from Japan, Indonesia, India, England - and many other countries. As a result, I have set up a *very* specific Skype address *only* for use of my students. They are required to set up the time and day with me ahead of time and I need to approve that request, but for them (and for some of my students scattered all over the state and US), the face time is invaluable in helping them feel "connected" - and I am more than happy to offer it. 5. As the software upgrades, the possibilities of what I can offer become more and more amazing, and the ease of use for both me - and for the students -  becomes astronomically better. Many have never known the software, so they don't notice it - but those who have taken online courses before cheer it on. Software does not achieve backwards. As very few of these issues are met by the onsite classroom, I am leaning more and more toward the online classroom as the better mode of instruction. Yes, there are times I *really* miss the onsite opportunities, but then I think of the above distinctions and realize that yes, I am where I should be, and virtually *ALL* the students are getting far more for their money than they would get in an onsite classroom. This is the wave of the future, and it holds such amazing promise. Already I think we are seeing clear and fruitful results, and if academics receive effective - and continuing - instruction and support from the very beginning, I cannot imagine why one would ever go back. The only reason I can think of *not* doing this is if the instructor has his or her *own* fear of computers. Beyond that - please, please jump on the bandwagon, swallow your fears, and learn how to do this with vigor. I don't think you will ever be sorry.PhD2BinUS
  • have been lucky enough to have taught the full range of our freshman / sophmore undergraduate offerings as both an onsite and online instructor. While I have thoroughly enjoyed both formats - and very much so - I must admit that my experiences online have been *much* more positive than onsite instruction. Let me try and elucidate:
  • While I have thoroughly enjoyed both formats - and very much so - I must admit that my experiences online have been *much* more positive than onsite instruction. Let me try and elucidate:
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    I am a graduate student at Sam Houston State University and before I started grad school I never had taken an online course before. My opinion then was that online courses were a joke and you couldn't learn from taking a course online. Now my opinion has done a complete 180. The teachers post numerous youtube arts and other helpful tools for each assignment so that anyone can successfully complete the assignment no matter what their technology skill level is. I do not see much difference between online and face-to-face now because of the way the instructors teach the courses.
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