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Lisa Francine

School Library Monthly - Student Inquiry and Web 2.0 - 54 views

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    "The Stripling Inquiry Model has six phases; however, it's not a linear process but rather a recursive one in which the learner might revisit a previous stage to ask additional questions or organize information, as the need arises. Each phase involves critical Inquiry skills that empower young people to learn on their own and develop the Inquiry skills to be independent, lifelong learners. The phases are as follows: Connect: observe, experience, connect a subject to self and previous knowledge Wonder: predict, develop questions and hypotheses Investigate: find and evaluate information to answer questions, test hypotheses Construct: draw conclusions, arrive at new understandings Express: apply understandings to a new context, share learning with others Reflect: examine one's own learning and ask new questions (Stripling 2003, 8). Technology and, in particular, Web 2.0 tools and services can be used throughout the Inquiry process to support the appropriate Inquiry skills. The key is to focus on student learning, not the Web 2.0 technology. The focus is on the phase(s) of Inquiry at which students are concentrating and deciding which technology tool can best support the Inquiry processes and instructional strategies of that phase of Inquiry. This increases the effectiveness of both the learning experience and the use of technology. An outline of the Inquiry phases aligned with Web 2.0 technology tools and instructional strategies can be seen in Figure 2."
Sharin Tebo

Scholastic Canada Education-Teaching Tip of the Month * January 2012 - 21 views

  • the power of compelling questions that drives deep interest, understanding, caring, and the application of 21st century skills.
  • During a whole group inquiry, students gain competence by being guided through the process and develop necessary skills and tools to aid in self-initiated inquiries. Often students don't have the necessary background knowledge to pose their own questions or lack understanding in identifying a question worthy of investigation so the large group approach is essential when getting started.
  • Begin by examining your curriculum and identifying a topic that you think will be interesting to students.
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  • Questions are open-ended in nature with no 'correct' answer; in fact, the answer is unknown. Inquiry questions represent what is at the "heart of the matter" and frame the unit as a puzzle or problem to be solved.
  • Your role in the large group inquiry is one of coach or facilitator.
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    Getting Started with Inquiry Learning in Your Classroom
Nigel Coutts

Thinking in the Wild - Thinking routines beyond the classroom - The Learner's Way - 21 views

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    Despite this being a 'thinking' conference, despite us all being advocates for structured and scaffolded models of thinking, not one group had applied any thinking routines, utilised a collaborative planning protocol or talked about applying an thinking model or design thinking cycle. It wasn't that we didn't know about them. It wasn't that we don't know how to use them. It wasn't that we don't value them. We had all the knowledge we could desire on the how to and the why of a broad set of thinking tools and anyone of these would have enhanced the process, but we did not use any of them. Why was this the case and what does this reveal about our teaching of these methods to our students?
Tony Baldasaro

The Window: Thinking in the Seams: Engaging Interdisciplinary Thinking - 1 views

  • thinking in the seams,” thinking that merges ideas from different disciplines to generate something novel and beneficial
  • “points of departure for discovering or confirming similar structures and relations in other disciplines.”
  • It stitches together perspectives or modes of inquiry from two or more disciplines to explore ideas. It is inquiry “in the seams.”
    • Tony Baldasaro
       
      I like this visual of "stitching" together ideas.
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  • Patterns play a critical role in enabling interdisciplinary thinking.
  • According to researchers, interdisciplinary thinking often follows a sequence of mental actions: relationships between ideas within a discipline are recognized→the relationships are recognized as forming pattern(s)→the pattern(s) are decontextualized/generalized→examples of the same pattern(s) are recognized in other disciplines→ideas from one discipline “overlay” with another, generating new ideas.3
  • “usable knowledge”—knowledge that “is connected and organized around important concepts” and “supports transfer (to other contexts) rather than only the ability to remember.”
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    Creativity, innovation, and deepened understanding can result from interdisciplinary thinking. Despite these potential benefits, schools rarely cultivate the "mental dexterity" required for thinking in the seams
Frederick Eberhardt

Powerful Learning: Studies Show Deep Understanding Derives from Collaborative Methods | Edutopia - 85 views

  • In essence, students must learn how to learn, while responding to endlessly changing technologies and social, economic, and global conditions.
  • students learn more deeply if they have engaged in activities that require applying classroom-gathered knowledge to real-world problems.
  • developing inquiring minds
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  • Studies of problem-based learning suggest that it is comparable, though not always superior, to more traditional instruction in teaching facts and information. However, this approach has been found to be better in supporting flexible problem solving, reasoning skills, and generating accurate hypotheses and coherent explanations.
  • design challenges need to be carefully planned, and they emphasized the importance of dynamic feedback.
  • When students have no prior experience with inquiry learning, they can have difficulty generating meaningful driving questions and logical arguments and may lack background knowledge to make sense of the inquiry.
    • Adrienne Michetti
       
      Absolutely true. I discovered this when I used inquiry-based methods with my students in Qatar who were used to rote learning. They truly did not know where to start. They first needed to learn *how* to be inquisitive.
  • Requiring students to track and defend their thinking focused them on learning and connecting concepts in their design work
  • All the research arrives at the same conclusion: There are significant benefits for students who work together on learning activities.
  • groups outperform individuals on learning tasks and that individuals who work in groups do better on later individual assessments.
  • In successful group learning, teachers pay careful attention to the work process and interaction among students.
  • "It is not enough to simply tell students to work together. They must have a reason to take one another's achievement seriously.
  • She and her colleagues developed Complex Instruction, one of the best-known approaches, which uses carefully designed activities requiring diverse talents and interdependence among group members.
    • Adrienne Michetti
       
      Interesting... worth checking out.
  • They require changes in curriculum, instruction, and assessment practices -- changes that are often new for teachers and students.
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    A scholarly article with tremendous real-world practical implications and suggestions. Love this.
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    A scholarly article with tremendous real-world practical implications and suggestions. Love this.
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    Vocational Education meets Research in the dynamic classroom of Linda Darling-Hammond, 2008. The students are doing the research, teaching and learning. They control their own destiny and they are taking the world by storm! They are not waiting to be taught, they are teaching each other and themselves as teams of researchers. Darling-Hammond, L. (2008). Powerful learning: what we know about teaching for understanding. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
Jon Tanner

Why Inquiry Learning is Worth the Trouble | MindShift - 98 views

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    Chris Lehman, principal of the Science Leadership Academy, talks about hot to guide kids to think about their own thinking.
Margaret FalerSweany

Educational Leadership:Writing: A Core Skill:Teach Critical Thinking to Teach Writing - 48 views

  • critical thinking doesn't come easily for anyone
  • writing does not necessarily teach critical thinkin
  • the best way to help students learn critical thinking may be to actually teach it
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  • although writing and thinking may be linked, students don't learn to think just by learning to write; rather, to learn to write, they need to learn to think.
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    An excellent article on the challenges we all face in become better at thinking critically and writing well. I have found that most students do better presenting arguments in written form when they have engaged in in-depth discussion, as then questioning and peer responses can prompt deeper thinking and make real the need to both cite and explain evidence. The Shared thinking method used in Great Books programs provides a focus on open, interpretive questions that require students to make an defend claims about the meaning of complex texts. The model lessons suggest a sequence of activities that supports multiple close readings, collaborative discussions, and writing throughout the process.
Wayne Holly

Should You Flip Your Classroom? | Edutopia - 207 views

  • different forms of instructional video published online for students
  • primarily by Salman Khan's TED talk
  • obtaining core content prior to coming to class
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  • classroom space was then used for critical thinking and group problem solving.
  • spend more time in the classroom focused on collaboration and higher-order thinking
  • lecture is still a poor mode of information transfer
  • Eric Mazur's talk Confessions of a Converted Lecturer
  • hype
  • Good teaching, regardless of discipline, should always limit passive transfer of knowledge in class, and promote learning environments built on the tenants of inquiry, collaboration and critical inquiry
  • pedagogical skills
  • The science teacher in me is deeply committed to the process of inquiry, and arming my students with the skills needed to construct and test their own ideas. The AP teacher in me fears sending my students off to their examination in May having covered only a portion of all the content required
  • inquiry learning cycle.
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    I like this concept - read more. Works against teacher as delivery system to be ignored.
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    At its core, "flipped instruction" refers to moving aspects of teaching out of the classroom and into the homework space. With the advent of new technologies, specifically the ability to record digitally annotated and narrated screencasts, instructional videos have become a common medium in the flipped classroom. Although not limited to videos, a flipped classroom most often harnesses different forms of instructional video published online for students.
Roland Gesthuizen

Inquire Within | It's not about getting the right answers but rather, asking really good questions - 7 views

  • If we live in a collaborative world, why do we often wait until the work environment before we learn from others?  Why do teachers fight the system, or more likely just ignore it?
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    How can we create the desire to inquire? That is a hard issue to grapple with (and worthy of much inquiry by educators), but I'm sure that: 1) it's not grades, and 2) there's no silver bullet to get students motivated to dig deeper and extend their own learning.  However, I think one great way to create deep motivation for some learners is encouraging them to leave a legacy.
Eric Arbetter

Thinking Like Breathing | Thoughtful Learning: Curriculum for 21st Century Skills, Thinking, Project-based Learning, and Problem-based Learning - 3 views

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    The author shows how critical thinking and creative thinking go hand-in-hand.  Great infographics.
Jim Peterson

9 Questions and Answers About science teaching - 40 views

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    9. In a post, you argue that the inquiry science teaching cannot flourish with common standards. What is an alternative solution?  That's right.  We do not need a set of Common Core Standards.  I am sure that the teachers in your high school are more capable of determining the curriculum for your classmates than any national committee assembled by the most prestigious organizations in the country.  Education needs to decentralized, not centralized.  There are more than 15,000 school districts in the United States.  Do you think that one set of standards would meet the needs of these 15, 000 school districts.
Marc Hamlin

Reintroducing students to Research - 144 views

  • First, we think research, broadly defined, is a valuable part of an undergraduate education. Even at a rudimentary level, engaging in research implicates students in the creation of knowledge. They need to understand that knowledge isn’t an inert substance they passively receive, but is continually created, debated, and reformulated—and they have a role to play in that process.
  • we recognize that research is situated in disciplinary frameworks and needs to be addressed in terms of distinct research traditions.
  • research is a complex and recursive process involving not just finding information but framing and refining a question, perhaps gathering primary data through field or lab work, choosing and evaluating appropriate evidence, negotiating different viewpoints, and composing some kind of response, all activities that are not linear but intertwined.
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  • learning to conduct inquiry is itself complex and recursive. These skills need to be developed throughout a research project and throughout a student’s education.
  • the hybrid nature of libraries today requires students to master both traditional and emerging information formats, but the skills that students need to conduct effective inquiry—for example, those mentioned in your mission statement of reading critically and reasoning analytically—are the same whether the materials they use are in print or electronic.
  • Too often, traditional research paper assignments defeat their own purpose by implying that research is not discovery, but rather a report on what someone else has already discovered. More than once I’ve had to talk students out of abandoning a paper topic because, to their dismay, they find out it’s original. If they can’t find a source that says for them exactly what they want to say—better yet, five sources—they think they’ll get in trouble.
  • In reality, students doing researched writing typically spend a huge percentage of their time mapping out the research area before they can focus their research question. This is perfectly legitimate, though they often feel they’re spinning wheels. They have to do a good bit of reading before they really know what they’re looking for.
  • she has students seek out both primary and secondary sources, make choices among them, and develop some conclusions in presentations that are far from standard literary criticism. One lab focuses on collecting and seeking relationships among assigned literary texts and other primary sources from the second half of the twentieth century to illuminate American society in that time period.
  • For this lab, groups of students must find ten primary sources that relate in some way to literary texts under discussion and then—here’s the unusual bit—write three new verses of “America the Beautiful” that use the primary sources to illuminate a vision of American society. Instead of amber waves of grain and alabaster cities, they select images that reformulate the form of the song to represent another vision of the country. At the end of the course, her final essay assignment calls upon all of the work the previous labs have done, asking students to apply the skills they’ve practiced through the semester. While students in this course don’t do a single, big research project, they practice skills that will prepare them to do more sophisticated work later.
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    What are our assumptions about how students get research done in the humanities? How do those assumptions affect our instruction, and what really is our students' approach to research?
Matt Renwick

Educational Leadership:Giving Students Meaningful Work:Seven Essentials for Project-Based Learning - 3 views

  • work as personally meaningful
  • fulfills an educational purpose
  • launching a project with an "entry event"
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  • brainstorming possible solutions
  • Students created a driving question
  • clear, compelling language
  • provocative, open-ended, complex, and linked to the core
  • the more voice and choice, the better
  • learners can select what topic to study within a general driving question or choose how to design, create, and present products.
  • teams of three or four
  • In writing journals, students reflected on their thinking
  • collaboration, communication, critical thinking, and the use of technology
  • whole class generated a list of more detailed questions
  • raised and investigated new questions
  • To guide students in real inquiry, refer students to the list of questions they generated after the entry event.
  • value questioning, hypothesizing, and openness
  • nvited audience included parents, peers, and representatives of community, business, and government organizations
  • arrange for experts or adult mentors to provide feedback
  • extended process of inquiry, critique, and revision
Deborah Baillesderr

Smart Science New Era in Science Education - 45 views

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    "Smart Science® online hands-on labs provide outstanding science education. Inexpensive and efficient STEM education. Built-in scientific inquiry facilitating student discovery of science. Online hands-on real experiments, not simulations. Online lab reports, easy to write and grade. Archive of lab reports obtained with a simple mouse click. Retention of lab reports and all student work for 5 years. Differentiated reading levels" Wow, pretty impressive and just might be worth the money. Do the lite demo they provide and see what you think.
Michaella Thornton

Ethics as a Form of Critical and Rhetorical Inquiry in the Writing Classroom - 0 views

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    English Journal article by Teresa Henning, 100.6 (2011): 34-40. Copyright by the National Council of Teachers of English. All rights reserved.
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    I think this English Journal article makes a compelling case for how ethical inquiry can be further supported in writing classrooms.
Roland Gesthuizen

FILLING THE TOOL BOX - 158 views

  • As one of the primary goals of education is to develop autonomous but interdependent thinkers, students deserve frequent opportunities to shape and direct classroom inquiry. To fuel this inquiry, it is also essential that we validate the importance of curiosity in the process of learning. While curiosity may have killed the cat, there is no reason for us to kill curiosity
  • Critical to all of these activities, however, is some kind of guided practice in how to think through such questions.
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    " Most of the strategies described below have been developed and tested by teachers in Princeton, Madison and elsewhere. They are offered as practical, effective activities that help shift the focus of classrooms from teacher orchestrated mastery and memory of information to student processing of information to create understanding and improve problem-solving."
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    Some great ways to stop killing curiosity and stimulate questioning in science and technology. An oldie but a goodie.
psmiley

Wonderopolis | Where the Wonders of Learning Never Cease - 20 views

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    Great resources for story starters or other inquiries.  Each day there is a new wonder, a new question to think about.
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    Our world is full of wonder!
anonymous

Project Based Learning | BIE - 65 views

shared by anonymous on 02 Dec 10 - Cached
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    In Project Based Learning (PBL), students go through an extended process of inquiry in response to a complex question, problem, or challenge. Rigorous projects help students learn key academic content and practice 21st Century Skills (such as collaboration, communication & critical inquiry). 
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