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Shannon Smith

Need resources to assist in creating a 21st century learner training/ professional deve... - 131 views

Thank you! This is great information! James McKee wrote: > Shannon, > > I was recently referred to this video of Michael Wesch who teaches cultural anthropology at Kansas State University. He ...

professional development 21st century learners technology

Dean Whaley

iowaonlinelearning - learning Standards - 27 views

  • Creates a learning community that encourages learning and interaction, including student-teacher, student-student, and student-content (SREB D.2, Varvel VII.B, ITS 6.a)
    • Dean Whaley
       
      What I see in these is that many of these we should be doing already.
  • AEA PD Online Website HomeAbout UsFAQsCurrent InitiativesResearch & ResourcesInstructor ToolboxK-12 Online ResourcesProject OLLIE Current Projects • Transition Process• Marketing Plan• Job Descriptions guest · Join · Help · Sign In · Resources StandardsProtected page Details and Tags Print Download PDF Backlinks Source Delete Rename Redirect Permissions Lock discussion (1) history notify me Details last edit by eabbey Mar 11, 2011 6:56 am - 26 revisions Tags none Iowa Online Resources Standards Composed from Iowa Resources Standards and Other Resources 1. Demonstrates ability to enhance academic performance and support for the agency's student achievement goals (ITS 1) • Knows and aligns instruction to the achievement goals of the local agency and the state, such as with the Iowa Core (Varvel I.A, ITS 1.f, ITS 3.a) • Continuously uses data to evaluate the accuracy and effectiveness of instructional strategies (SREB J.7, ITS 1.c) • Utilizes a course evaluation and student feedback data to improve the course (Varvel VI.F) • Provides and communicates evidence of Resources and course data to students and colleagues (SREB J.6, ITS 1.a) 2. Demonstrates competence in content knowledge (including technological knowledge) appropriate to the instructional position (ITS 2) • Meets the professional Resources standards established by a state-licensing agency, or has the academic credentials in the field in which he or she is Resources (SREB A.1, Varvel II.A) • Knows the content of the subject to be taught and understands how to teach the content to students (SREB A.3, Varvel II.A, ITS 2.a) • Is knowledgeable and has the ability to use computer programs required in online education to improve Resources and Resources, including course management software (CMS) and synchronous/asynchronous communication t
Peter Beens

Free Teaching Teaching, Teaching, & Lesson Plans - Intel Education - 41 views

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    Intel offers free, easily integrated tools and tools tools to support collaborative student-centered tools. Our online thinking tools provide active tools places where students can engage in robust discussions, analyze complex information, pursue investigations, and solve problems. You'll also find tools tools such as exemplary lesson plans, assessment strategies, and tools-enriched project ideas for all K-12 subjects. Developed by educators, these free tools and tools support 21st century tools, with project-based approaches in the classroom.
tab_ras

Wikis in the Classroom: Three Ways to Increase Student Collaboration - Faculty Focus | Faculty Focus - 200 views

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    I've long said that professors who want to explore teaching with teaching should begin with a social media tool rather than a teaching Management System. Web 2.0 teaching are simple to use, invite student teaching, and are usually less administratively clunky and complex than an LMS.One of the easiest and most powerful teaching is the regular old wiki. Wikis are simply web pages that can be edited by their users. Instead of only carrying content from the administrator, they harness the power of crowdsourcing to create a powerful communal resource.
Thieme Hennis

About « OERRH - 19 views

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    "The Open Educational Resources Research Hub (OER Research Hub) provides a focus for research, designed to give answers to the overall question 'What is the impact of OER on Resources and Resources practices?' and identify the particular influence of openness. We do this by working in Resources with projects across four education sectors (K12, college, higher education and informal) extending a network of research with shared methods and shared results. By the end of this research we will have evidence for what works and when, but also established methods and instruments for broader engagement in researching the impact of openness on Resources. OER are not just another educational innovation. They influence policy and change practices. In previous research (OpenLearn, Bridge to Success and OLnet) we have seen changes in institutions, teacher practice and in the effectiveness of Resources. We integrate research alongside action to discover and support changes in broader initiatives. Our framework provides the means to gather data and the Resources to tackle barriers. The project combines: A targeted Resources program with existing OER projects An internationalfellowship program Networking to make connections A hub for research data and OER excellence in practice The Resourcess cover different sectors and issues, these include: the opening up of classroom based Resources to open content; the large-scale decision points implied by open textbooks for community colleges; the extension of Resources beyond textbook through eBook and simulation; the challenge of teacher training in India; and the ways that OER can support less formal approaches to Resources. By basing good practice on practical experience and research we can help tackle practical problems whilst building the evidence bank needed by all."
Michele Brown

TeachTec's Tools for Schools - 17 views

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    Some very interesting Microsoft applications that might be suitable for schools. It includes Beginner Developer, Chemistry Add-in for Word, Education Labs for Maths test creation, Microsoft Robotics and others. Hat tip to Skipz
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    A great place to find tech tools to use with MS Office programs. Find and download alll of Microsoft's free tools for teachers and students.  Updated 3.18.2012 Microsoft Partners in tools helps educators connect, collaborate, create and share. TeachTec is a Microsoft Partners in tools resource that helps educators find relevant and effective ways to use tools to inspire tools and engage students. Together we have consolidated the latest and most popular teacher and student tools that Microsoft provides to all schools, districts and education organizations around the world.
tapiatanova

A Social Network Can Be a Learning Network - The Digital Campus - The Chronicle of Higher Education - 98 views

  • Sharing student work on a course blog is an example of what Randall Bass and Heidi Elmendorf, of Georgetown University, call "social pedagogies." They define these as "design approaches for teaching and teaching that engage students with what we might call an 'authentic audience' (other than the teacher), where the representation of knowledge for an audience is absolutely central to the construction of knowledge in a course."
    • tab_ras
       
      Very important - social pedagogies for authentic tasks - a key for integrating SNTs in the classroom.
    • Daniel Spielmann
       
      Agreed, for connectivism see also www.connectivism.ca
  • External audiences certainly motivate students to do their best work. But students can also serve as their own authentic audience when asked to create meaningful work to share with one another.
    • Daniel Spielmann
       
      The last sentence is especially important in institutional contexts where the staff voices their distrust against "open scholarship" (Weller 2011), web 2.0 and/or open education. Where "privacy" is deemed the most important thing in dealing with new technologies, advocates of an external audience have to be prepared for certain questions.
    • tapiatanova
       
      yes! nothing but barriers! However, it is unclear if the worries about pravacy are in regards to students or is it instructors who fear teaching in the open. everyone cites FERPA and protection of student identities, but I have yet to hear any student refusing to work in the open...
  • Students most likely won't find this difficult. After all, you're asking them to surf the Web and tag pages they like. That's something they do via Facebook every day. By having them share course-related content with their peers in the class, however, you'll tap into their desires to be part of your course's learning community. And you might be surprised by the learning they find and share.
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  • back-channel conversations
  • While keynote speakers and session leaders are speaking, audience members are sharing highlights, asking questions, and conversing with colleagues on Twitter
    • tab_ras
       
      An effective use of Twitter that can be translated to classrooms.
    • Daniel Spielmann
       
      All classrooms?
    • John Dorn
       
      classrooms where students are motivated to learn. Will this work in a HS classroom where kids just view their phones as a means to check up on people? Maybe if they can see "cool" class could be if they were responsible for the freedoms that would be needed to use twitter or other similar sites.
  • Ask your students to create accounts on Twitter or some other back-channel tool and share ideas that occur to them in your course. You might give them specific assignments, as does the University of Connecticut's Margaret Rubega, who asks students in her ornithology class to tweet about birds they see. During a face-to-face class session, you could have students discuss their reading in small groups and share observations on the back channel. Or you could simply ask them to post a single question about the week's reading they would like to discuss.
  • A back channel provides students a way to stay connected to the course and their fellow students. Students are often able to integrate back channels into their daily lives, checking for and sending updates on their smartphones, for instance. That helps the class become more of a community and gives students another way to learn from each other.
  • Deep learning is hard work, and students need to be well motivated in order to pursue it. Extrinsic factors like grades aren't sufficient—they motivate competitive students toward strategic learning and risk-averse students to surface learning.
  • Social pedagogies provide a way to tap into a set of intrinsic motivations that we often overlook: people's desire to be part of a community and to share what they know with that community.
  • Online, social pedagogies can play an important role in creating such a community. These are strong motivators, and we can make use of them in the courses we teach.
  • The papers they wrote for my course weren't just academic exercises; they were authentic expressions of learning, open to the world as part of their "digital footprints."
    • Daniel Spielmann
       
      Yes, but what is the relation between such writing and ("proper"?) academic writing?
  • Collaborative documents need not be text-based works. Sarah C. Stiles, a sociologist at Georgetown, has had her students create collaborative timelines showing the activities of characters in a text, using a presentation tool called Prezi.com. I used that tool to have my cryptography students create a map of the debate over security and privacy. They worked in small groups to brainstorm arguments, and contributed those arguments to a shared debate map synchronously during class.
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    A great blog post on social pedagogies and how they can be incorporated in university/college classes. A good understanding of creating authentic learning experiences through social media.
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    A great blog post on social pedagogies and how they can be incorporated in university/college classes. A good understanding of creating authentic learning experiences through social media.
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    A great blog post on social pedagogies and how they can be incorporated in university/college classes. A good understanding of creating authentic learning experiences through social media.
Karen Polstra

Classroom 2.0 - 62 views

    • Justin Shorb
       
      How many members of the Diigo Ed group are using this forum? I don't want to be overwhelmed by too many social networking groups that I become inundated with too much information to be a truly participating member of any of them. I like the Diigo Ed group, so far!
    • Monika King
       
      I enjoy reading the items in the Forum, but I have yet to contribute.
    • Meredith Johnson
       
      I find the two forums match very well for what my interests are in education.
    • Deb White Groebner
       
      While I am new to the Diigo Ed group (and like it so far), I joined CR 2.0 a year and a half ago and have thoroughly enjoyed the conversations, info, and (especially) the webinars! Lots of good sharing all around.
    • Antwon Lincoln
       
      Just a wonderful resource for all who are in to connecting classrooms with technology!
    • Phil Taylor
       
      I also belong to Diigo in Education as well as four of EDTech type groups, as well as one that I have created for my school.
    • Gerald Carey
       
      I also can see different uses for these two forums.
    • Susan Wanke
       
      I've been using Diigo and the group Diigo in Education for quite some time, but Classroom 2.0 is active with tons of ideas for all of us.
  • social network for those interested in Web 2.0 and Social Media in education
  • Classroom 2.0 is a free, community-supported network. We especially hope that those who are "beginners" will find this a supportive comfortable place to start being part of the digital dialog. Because of spammers, we have to approve all memberships here. While your membership is pending you are still welcome to peruse the site or attend any events!
    • Molly Hinkle
       
      I'm wondering how the value of this will balance with the time required to do it right!
    • Karen Polstra
       
      Me too.  I just joined.  We will see.
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    Online social networking at its best. This Ning page is centered around using online resources in today's classrooms. Excellent group!
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    The community for educators using Web 2.0 and collaborative technologies!
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    I've been using it the last 3 weeks. There is a large group of educators there and usefull shared information.
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    I just joined the Classroom 2.0 ning about a week ago. It appears to have some valuable information. I am new to social networking, but am looking forward to the experience. I am very interested in Web 2.0 technologies so the ning seemed like a good place to start.
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    This is an interesting website with a great collection of tools for use in e-tools, blended classrooms and traditional tools.
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    This is an interesting website with a great collection of tools for use in e-tools, blended classrooms and traditional tools.
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    web 2,  classroom practice
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    This is an interesting website with a great collection of tools for use in e-tools, blended classrooms and traditional tools.
Sasha Thackaberry

E-learning on the rise - 28 views

  • ​E-learning is a growing trend at community colleges, according to survey results from the National Association for Community College Entrepreneurship (NACCE) and Hewlett-Packard (HP).
  • E-learning is already used at 47 percent of community colleges and is expected to increase to 55 percent within two years. The survey of 578 community college faculty was conducted by Eric Liguori, an assistant professor at California State University.
  • Eighty-four percent of respondents believe e-learning is a valuable educational tool.
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  • The top five benefits of e-learning identified by respondents are: It increases access through location and time-flexible learning. More learning and information are available to students 24/7. Teachers can use a wide variety of learning and methods for learning. It is a good supplement to face-to-face curriculum. It can lead to a richer learning experience if integrated correctly, freeing up class time for more engaging activities. This experience is often referred to as “flipping the classroom.”
  • When asked about the barriers to adopting online learning, faculty cited such concerns as doubt about its capability and reliability, acceptance by students and teachers, and lack of learning, such as time and technical support.
  • Twenty-three percent of respondents said the effectiveness of e-learning depends on the learning available, including the format and features of courses. For example, e-learning is best when teachers are adequately trained to use it, there is high-quality content and curriculum design, it’s used in conjunction with real-world situations and there is opportunity for student-teacher interactions, discussion boards and collaborative projects.
  • “Our survey looked at how community college faculty members are using e-learning as a cost-effective means” to increase completion rates and ensure that “students walk away with credentials that are meaningful in the workplace and that they are prepared for the careers they hope to pursue, including, for many, the start of entrepreneurial endeavors,” said NACCE President and CEO Heather Van Sickle.
Maria José Vitorino

To Share or Not to Share: Is That the Question? (EDUCAUSE Review) | EDUCAUSE - 28 views

  • Open digital faculty do more than just share and participate in open resources; they transfer their approaches to the resources space. resources becomes a shared activity in which the students also collaborate and participate in shaping the course activities. Student participation takes place in open environments where students might tweet what they learn, share insights on a group blog, create their own website of resources, or participate in a class wiki.
  • The difference is that today's sharing facilitators leverage technology to reach a much wider audience.
  • Although the natural inclination toward sharing cannot be altered, the moral responsibility to share can be influenced by the surrounding culture. The sense of obligation to share or not to share may be similar to the decision to be a vegetarian. For some, it is a lifestyle choice that may form slowly over a long period of time after many conversations with friends and colleagues. For others, the change can be sudden: a paradigm shift caused by participation in an unusual event. If an institution places value on faculty participation in open academic communities and social media activities (e.g., academic blogging), that culture can slowly influence faculty to be more open.
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  • These digital activities should not be the sole measure of tenure, but they should be counted in the tenure formula. The irony today is that if the open activity is analog (e.g., participation on a committee), it likely counts toward tenure, but if the open activity is digital (e.g., writing an academic blog), it probably does not.
  • They will push at (and leak out of) the boundaries of whatever learning management system (or other enterprise systems) the institution wants them to use. This is not because they are uncooperative; it's simply that these enterprise systems tend to be locked down, allowing only employees and students to share within these environments
  • For me, an interesting side effect of sharing on the open web is that I've learned to be more careful about what I say and write.
  • Looking for indicators of open digital faculty is easier than coming up with a strict definition. The presence of several of the following characteristics should be taken as an indication of open digital faculty: Writing a public blog or maintaining a public wiki to share academic interests Freely sharing what might otherwise be guarded intellectual property (e.g., textbooks, research-in-progress, computer programs, course materials, artwork) Participating in a learning community in a social networking platform (e.g., Twitter or LinkedIn discussion groups) Participating in a social network that includes students, both current and past (e.g., Facebook) Encouraging students to participate in class-related projects that employ web-based media (e.g., student blogs, group wikis) Creating or participating in open courses Sharing video or audio content created for a course (e.g., podcasts) Sharing information and ideas from conference talks on the web (e.g., recordings, tweets, presentation links)
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    Open digital faculty do more than just share and participate in open resources; they transfer their approaches to the resources space. resources becomes a shared activity in which the students also collaborate and participate in shaping the course activities. Student participation takes place in open environments where students might tweet what they learn, share insights on a group blog, create their own website of resources, or participate in a class wiki.
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    University context for open sources, sharingand digital trends era
Eric Robertson

Podcast: Mobile and Learning with Dr. Michael Truong - 18 views

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    Host Eric Robertson's conversation with Michael Truong, Associate Director of UC Merced's Center for Research on Teaching Excellence looks at Teaching innovations at the UC system's newest campus as an indicator for what is happening nationally. After covering topics ranging from the role of Teaching Management Systems to trends in student Teaching purchases, their conversation focuses on UC Merced's Mobile App Teaching Lounge, a resource designed to help students and faculty explore the possibilities of Teaching and Teaching using mobile applications. Truong argues that mobile Teaching are dramatically enhancing assessment, communication between students and faculty, Teaching activities, and even access to and time spent with Teaching materials. The conversation concludes with a fascinating discussion about the challenges of Teaching in an age of Teaching driven distraction. Referencing thinkers like Michael Wesch, Sherry Terkle and Nicholas Carr, Robertson and Truong explore how faculty can help students develop critical thinking skills in a "search culture" by moving beyond consuming knowledge to curating and producing it.
Maria Nuzzo

Tech Tools - 194 views

    • mspietrzak
       
      I like that the links are broken down by uses and that they are rated with how easy they are to use and usefulness.
  • cool tools
  • promote critical-thinking, creativity, collaboration, and community-mindedness
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    This site provides resources using a clickable list that takes you to the sources to best meet you and your students resources goals.
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    Great site with specific suggestions for technology technology based on objectives.
Sandy Munnell

Teaching and Teaching: Using iPads in the Classroom | Edutopia - 158 views

  • Most students today would be classified as bodily-kinesthetic learners.
    • Miss OConnor
       
      Why?  What has changed and if this is true, what are the implications in the classroom when most teachers are visual/auditory learners?
    • Sandy Munnell
       
      I would agree - making this assumption leads to other assumptions that have no scientific basis. It's a reaction to a supposed change in student learning behaviors. But it is the kind of statement that let's learning advocates jump on the bandwagon and sell their learning.
  • An app called Field Notes LT not only allows students to take copious notes of their observations, it attaches the date, time, GPS location and photographs of what is observed. These notes can be instantly shared, collaborated, and published in the field.
  • Perhaps a better question is what would I do with them that I could not do with other tools that are available and cheaper?
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    This article explores various iPad apps that could "transform" the classroom.  
Phil Taylor

Thumann Resources - 0 views

  • “How can educators around the world use technology to connect, collaborate, teach, support and inspire each other? Collaborative Internet applications allow educators to create online communities that support their professional technology and relieve their isolation. In this session we will focus on the ways two social networking technology, Twitter and Classroom 2.0, can be harnessed to build a rich and powerful technology community.
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    From Twitter PLN - great resource and explaination for why teachers should use Twitter to build up their PLNs
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    I realize there are many amazing posts on the merits of using Twitter to develop a PLN. I also realize that there already exists dozens of collections of tools for making the most of Twitter. Yet, as I prepare for my presentation at NJECC's annual conference tomorrow, I am compelled to write one of my own.
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