Skip to main content

Home/ Diigo In Education/ Group items matching "teaching "common core standards"" in title, tags, annotations or url

Group items matching
in title, tags, annotations or url

Sort By: Relevance | Date Filter: All | Bookmarks | Topics Simple Middle
Tim Smith

Common Core State Standards Initiative | The Standards - 46 views

  • The Common Core State Standards focus on core conceptual understandings and procedures starting in the early grades, thus enabling teachers to take the time needed to teach core concepts and procedures well—and to give students the opportunity to master them.
    • Wendi Cyford
       
      Core Standards information
    • Tim Smith
       
      I have a mutliage looping classroom that includes both 5th & 6th graders togther. My question is, based on the obvious split in the CC between grade 3-5, and 6-8, is this a viable classroom setting anymore.
  • With students, parents and teachers all on the same page and working together for shared goals, we can ensure that students make progress each year and graduate from school prepared to succeed in college and in a modern workforce.
aaxtell

CCSS "I Can" statements for K-8 - 64 views

  •  
    Kids learn best when they know what they're supposed to be learning. Make learning outcomes explicit with kid-friendly "I Can" statements tied to each Common Core standard.
  •  
    Kids learn best when they know what they're supposed to be learning. Make learning outcomes explicit with kid-friendly "I Can" statements tied to each Common Core standard.
Jim Peterson

9 Questions and Answers About science teaching - 40 views

  •  
    9. In a post, you argue that the inquiry science teaching cannot flourish with common standards. What is an alternative solution?  That's right.  We do not need a set of Common Core Standards.  I am sure that the teachers in your high school are more capable of determining the curriculum for your classmates than any national committee assembled by the most prestigious organizations in the country.  Education needs to decentralized, not centralized.  There are more than 15,000 school districts in the United States.  Do you think that one set of standards would meet the needs of these 15, 000 school districts.
Steve Ransom

Principal: 'I was naïve about Common Core' - 4 views

  • The promise of the Common Core is dying and teaching and learning are being distorted.  The well that should sustain the Core has been poisoned.
  • Whether or not learning the word ‘commission’ is appropriate for second graders could be debated—I personally think it is a bit over the top.  What is of deeper concern, however, is that during a time when 7 year olds should be listening to and making music, they are instead taking a vocabulary quiz.
  • Real learning occurs in the mind of the learner when she makes connections with prior learning, makes meaning, and retains that knowledge in order to create additional meaning from new information.  In short, with tests we see traces of learning, not learning itself.
  • ...7 more annotations...
  • Teachers are engaged in practices like these because they are pressured and afraid, not because they think the assessments are educationally sound. Their principals are pressured and nervous about their own scores and the school’s scores. Guaranteed, every child in the class feels that pressure and trepidation as well.
  • I am troubled that a company that has a multi-million dollar contract to create tests for the state should also be able to profit from producing test prep materials. I am even more deeply troubled that this wonderful little girl, whom I have known since she was born, is being subject to this distortion of what her primary education should be.
  • The Common Core places an extraordinary emphasis on vocabulary development
  • Parents can expect that the other three will be neglected as teachers frantically try to prepare students for the difficult and high-stakes tests.
  • They see data, not children. 
  • Data should be used as a strategy for improvement, not for accountability
  • A fool with a tool is still a fool.  A fool with a powerful tool is a dangerous fool.
Matt Renwick

Common Sense for the Common Core - edu Pulse - 27 views

  • literacy achievement gains tend to be fleeting
  • Without administrators who have a solid knowledge of effective literacy instruction
  • two huge obstacles may eventually cause the downfall
  • ...15 more annotations...
  • became necessary when it was blatantly apparent that not all students in U.S schools had equal opportunity to learn
  • standards are necessary but insufficient
  • isolated skills and/or standards
  • depends on teachers and leaders knowing how to expertly implement them
  • proliferating “Common Core-aligned” materials
  • We are a “quick fix” society, and we often reject a commitment to long-term goals and outcomes. 
  • What’s on the test is what gets taught
  • high-stakes testing that accompanies the standards
  • Administrators need to take the lead
  • Become discerning readers and writers.
  • Do more read-alouds of excellent literature.
  • Standards do not transform teaching and learning
  • Organize curriculum through emphasizing big ideas and important concepts.
  • Embed shared experiences in your teaching.
  • a culture of trust, inquiry, coaching, collaboration, celebration of strengths, and, yes, even joy
Kelly Dau

Math Teaching Resources for K-5 Classrooms - 121 views

  •  
    This site provides a range of resources, math games, and hands-on math activities aligned with the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics. Also available are Math Journal tasks for Kindergarten, 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th Grade for teachers looking to use Math Journals as a means of providing students with opportunities to organize, clarify and reflect on their thinking while developing key mathematical skills and understandings.
  •  
    This site provides an extensive collection of free resources, math games, and hands-on math activities aligned with the Common Core State Standards.
Judy Robison

NASA Physics and Engineering | Classroom Resources | PBS Learning Media - 64 views

  •  
    * Videos and interactive presentations drawn from NASA's vast collection of media resources * Informational texts, discussion questions, and teaching tips to support the Next Generation Science Standards and the Common Core State Standards for Literacy * Professional development resources that illustrate best practices and provide concrete models of effective teaching
Martha Hickson

5 Things Every Teacher Should be Doing to Meet the Common Core State Standards - 40 views

  •  
    The Common Core State Standards highlight five shifts that should be happening in every classroom. Teachers should: * Lead High-Level, Text-Based Discussions * Focus on Process, Not Just Content * Create Assignments for Real Audiences and with Real Purpose * Teach Argument, Not Persuasion * Increase Text Complexity
Amy Roediger

Reading Strategies for 'Informational Text' - NYTimes.com - 172 views

  • Four Corners and Anticipation Guides:Both of these techniques “activate schema” by asking students to react in some way to a series of controversial statements about a topic they are about to study. In Four Corners, students move around the room to show their degree of agreement or disagreement with various statements — about, for instance, the health risks of tanning, or the purpose of college, or dystopian teen literature. An anticipation guide does the same thing, though generally students simply react in writing to a list of statements on a handout. In this warm-up to a lesson on some of the controversies currently raging over school reform, students can use the statements we provide in either of these ways.
  • Gallery Walks:A rich way to build background on a topic at the beginning of a unit (or showcase learning at the end), Gallery Walks for this purpose are usually teacher-created collections of images, articles, maps, quotations, graphs and other written and visual texts that can immerse students in information about a broad subject. Students circulate through the gallery, reading, writing and talking about what they see.
  • Graphic Organizers:
  • ...4 more annotations...
  • Making Text-to-Text/Text-to-Self/Text-to-World connectionsCharting Debatable IssuesListing Facts/Questions/ResponsesIdentifying Cause and EffectSupporting Opinions With FactsTracking The Five W’s and an HIdentifying Multiple Points of ViewIdentifying a Problem and SolutionComparing With a Venn Diagram
  • The One-Pager:Almost any student can find a “way in” with this strategy, which involves reacting to a text by creating one page that shows an illustration, question and quote that sum up some key aspect of what a student learned.
  • “Popcorn Reads”:Invite students to choose significant words, phrases or whole sentences from a text or texts to read aloud in random fashion, without explanation. Though this may sound pointless until you try it, it is an excellent way for students to “hear” some of the high points or themes of a text emerge, and has the added benefit of being an activity any reader can participate in easily.
  • Illustrations:Have students create illustrations for texts they’re reading, either in the margins as they go along, or after they’ve finished. The point of the exercise is not, of course, to create beautiful drawings, but to help them understand and retain the information they learn.
  •  
    Update | Feb. 2012: We'll be exploring the new Common Core State Standards, and how teaching with The Times can address them, through a series of blog posts. You can find them all here, tagged "the NYT and the CCSS."
  •  
    A good list of reading strategies for informational text from the New York Times.
Maureen Greenbaum

The crucial need to hold students to a higher standard - The Week - 6 views

  • Even some high school valedictorians are taking remedial courses in college. Too many students are completely unprepared for the future.
  • Last year, the unemployment rate for Americans without a high school diploma was 14.1 percent. For those with a Bachelor's degree, it was 4.9 percent.
  • Common Core State Standards, orient instruction around critical thinking and problem solving, requiring students to demonstrate a deep understanding of concepts and then apply them to new situations.
  • ...5 more annotations...
  • they are internationally-benchmarked and based on evidence and research about what it takes to be prepared for first-year college courses and entry level jobs leading to careers.
  • A student, for example, would no longer be required to simply memorize the formula for volume. Instead, they would need to use their conceptual understanding of volume to build different containers with the same volume. This approach differs from current standards and teaching practices, which too often place an emphasis on rote memorization over deeper understanding. 
  • Second, the standards are clear, focused, and rigorous
  • standards allow for economies of scale and the ability to share and compare across state lines.
  • Teachers in states that have adopted the Common Core can share effective practices and materials and collaborate more easily
Matt Renwick

Rage Against the Common Core - NYTimes.com - 22 views

  • Race to the Top program to encourage states
  • misconception that standards and testing are identical has become widespread
  • Many teachers like the standards, because they invite creativity in the classroom — instead of memorization, the Common Core emphasizes critical thinking and problem-solving.
  • ...5 more annotations...
  • unreliable and biased against those who teach both low- and high-achieving students.
  • 76 percent of teachers favored nationwide academic standards
  • Obama administration has only itself to blame
  • emphasized high-stakes “accountability” and market-driven reforms
  • link talented teachers with engaged students and a challenging curriculum
Florence Dujardin

Revisiting Professional Learning Communities to Increase College Readiness - 17 views

  •  
    For over a decade, professional learning communities (PLCs) have been touted as an effective way to build upon the knowledge and skills of experienced teachers, yet much of the evidence base is derived from self-reports by practitioners. Although several generations of school reform (the standards movement, No Child Left Behind, and now the Common Core State Standards) have cited improving teacher effectiveness as key to improving student achievement, little change has occurred in the nature of professional development. This article argues that professional development generally, and PLCs in particular, would benefit from the insights gleaned from the extensive literature on teacher expertise that focuses on how well teachers understand the content they teach and how well they understand how students learn that content.
danthomander

The University of Arizona - Institute for Mathematics & Education - 35 views

  •  
    "Progressions Documents", the documents which outline specific mathematical learning progressions upon which the Common Core State Standards were based. If you're in a state that teaches these you should definitely find some time to read through them. If you are a teacher elsewhere, it can't hurt to understand these progressions.
Milissa Copeland

10 Tech Tools to Teach the Common Core Standards - SimpleK12 Teacher Learning Community - 80 views

    • Milissa Copeland
       
      This is good to send to Tech for Teachers class
  • 10 Tech Tools to Teach the Common Core Standards
Maughn Gregory

How to Fix Our Math Education - NYTimes.com - 63 views

  • the assumption that there is a single established body of mathematical skills that everyone needs to know to be prepared for 21st-century careers. This assumption is wrong. The truth is that different sets of math skills are useful for different careers, and our math education should be changed to reflect this fact.
  • Today, American high schools offer a sequence of algebra, geometry, more algebra, pre-calculus and calculus (or a “reform” version in which these topics are interwoven). This has been codified by the Common Core State Standards, recently adopted by more than 40 states. This highly abstract curriculum is simply not the best way to prepare a vast majority of high school students for life.
  • A math curriculum that focused on real-life problems would still expose students to the abstract tools of mathematics, especially the manipulation of unknown quantities. But there is a world of difference between teaching “pure” math, with no context, and teaching relevant problems that will lead students to appreciate how a mathematical formula models and clarifies real-world situations.
  • ...4 more annotations...
  • For instance, how often do most adults encounter a situation in which they need to solve a quadratic equation? Do they need to know what constitutes a “group of transformations” or a “complex number”? Of course professional mathematicians, physicists and engineers need to know all this, but most citizens would be better served by studying how mortgages are priced, how computers are programmed and how the statistical results of a medical trial are to be understood.
  • Imagine replacing the sequence of algebra, geometry and calculus with a sequence of finance, data and basic engineering.
  • Traditionalists will object that the standard curriculum teaches valuable abstract reasoning, even if the specific skills acquired are not immediately useful in later life. A generation ago, traditionalists were also arguing that studying Latin, though it had no practical application, helped students develop unique linguistic skills. We believe that studying applied math, like learning living languages, provides both useable knowledge and abstract skills.
  • In math, what we need is “quantitative literacy,” the ability to make quantitative connections whenever life requires (as when we are confronted with conflicting medical test results but need to decide whether to undergo a further procedure) and “mathematical modeling,” the ability to move practically between everyday problems and mathematical formulations (as when we decide whether it is better to buy or lease a new car).
Matt Renwick

Cultivating Passionate Learners in Common Core Classrooms | MiddleWeb - 21 views

  • we have to find our own freedom and creativity within them.
  • look at the unit’s end goal and work backwards from there
  • asked the students how they would like to reach these goals
  • ...2 more annotations...
  • create a crayfish documentary
  • told me better than any test
Kevin Kaeser

Teacher Resources | Library of Congress - 6 views

  •  
    "The Library of Congress offers classroom materials and professional development to help teachers effectively use primary sources from the Library's vast digital collections in their teaching. Find Library of Congress lesson plans and more that meet Common Core standards, state content standards, and the standards of national organizations."
mrs Thompson

If You Teach or Write 5-Paragraph Essays--Stop It! | The White Rhino: A Chicago Latino English Teacher - 19 views

  •  
    Ray Salazar's argument for changing our approach to writing essays in light of the Common Core State Standards...very interesting.
Alfredo Zavaleta

How Teens Do Research in the Digital World | Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project - 105 views

  • Overview Three-quarters of AP and NWP teachers say that the internet  and digital search tools have had a “mostly positive” impact on their students’ research habits, but 87% say these technologies are creating an “easily distracted generation with short attention spans” and 64% say today’s digital technologies “do more to distract students than to help them academically.”
  • Overall, the vast majority of these teachers say a top priority in today’s classrooms should be teaching students how to “judge the quality of online information.”
  • The internet and digital technologies are significantly impacting how students conduct research: 77% of these teachers say the overall impact is “mostly positive,” but they sound many cautionary notes
  • ...9 more annotations...
  • Teachers and students alike report that for today’s students, “research” means “Googling.”  As a result, some teachers report that for their students “doing research” has shifted from a relatively slow process of intellectual curiosity and discovery to a fast-paced, short-term exercise aimed at locating just enough information to complete an assignment.
    • Kelly Sereno
       
      Yikes - a disturbing survey response!
  •   Second and third on the list of frequently used sources are online encyclopedias such as Wikipedia, and social media sites such as YouTube. 
  •  94% of the teachers surveyed say their students are “very likely” to use Google or other online search engines in a typical research assignment, placing it well ahead of all other sources that we asked about
  • e databases such as EBSCO, JSTOR, or Grolier (17%) A research librarian at their school or public library (16%)
  • In response to this trend, many teachers say they shape research assignments to address what they feel can be their students’ overdependence on search engines and online encyclopedias.  Nine in ten (90%) direct their students to specific online resources they feel are most appropriate for a particular assignment, and 83% develop research questions or assignments that require students to use a wider variety of sources, both online and offline.
  • Teachers give students’ research skills modest ratings Despite viewing the overall impact of today’s digital environment on students’ research habits as “mostly positive,” teachers rate the actual research skills of their students as “good” or “fair” in most cases.  Very few teachers rate their students “excellent” on any of the research skills included in the survey.  This is notable, given that the majority of the sample teaches Advanced Placement courses to the most academically advanced students.
    • Kelly Sereno
       
      These research skills relate to the common core literacy standards, and many ratings of students' skills in these areas fell into fair or poor categories.
  • Overwhelming majorities of these teachers also agree with the assertions that “today’s digital technologies are creating an easily distracted generation with short attention spans” (87%) and “today’s students are too ‘plugged in’ and need more time away from their digital technologies” (86%).  Two-thirds (64%) agree with the notion that “today’s digital technologies do more to distract students than to help them academically.”
    • Alfredo Zavaleta
       
      Students need to show more patience, take longer to decide, ponder the options.
    • Alfredo Zavaleta
       
      Procrastination not necessarily bad- see TED on procrastination
1 - 20 of 23 Next ›
Showing 20 items per page