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Sharin Tebo

5 Reasons Why Reading Conferences Matter - Especially in High School Read | Three Teachers Talk - 57 views

  • Reading Conferences
  • Every child needs one-on-one conversations with an adult as often as possible.
  • One way to show our adolescent students that we care is to talk with them. And face-to-face conversations about books and booksing is a pretty safe way to do so, not to mention that we model authentic conversations about booksing when we do.
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  • The more we grow in empathy, the better relationship we’ll have with our friends, our families and all other people we associate with — at least the idealist in me will cling to that hope as I continue to talk to students about books and booksing.
  • circles about engagement.
  • Try questions like: How’s it going? (Thanks, Carl Anderson) Why did you choose this book? Do you know anyone else who has read this book? What’d she think? How’d you find the time to read this week? What’s standing in the way of your reading time?
  • Try questions like: What character reminds you of yourself or someone you know? What part of the story is the most similar/different to your life? Why do you think the author makes that happen in the book? What does he want us to learn about life? How does this story/character/conflict/event make you think about life differently?
  • when I take the time to talk to each student individually, and reinforce the skill in a quick chat, the application of that skill some how seeps into their brains much deeper.
  • Try questions like: Tell me about _____ that we learned in class today. How does that relate to your book/character? Remember when we learned _____, tell me how/where you see that in your book. Think about when we practiced ___, where does the author do that in your book? You’ve improved with ___, how could you use that skill for _______?
  • We must provide opportunities for our students to grow into confident and competent readers and writers in order to handle the rigor and complexity of post high school education and beyond. We must remember to focus on literacy not on the literature
  • We must validate our readers, ask questions that spark confidence, avoid questions that demean or make the student defensive, and at the same time challenge our readers into more complex texts.
  • Try questions like: On a scale of 1 to 10 how complex is this book for you? Why? What do you do when the reading gets difficult? Of all the read you’ve read this year, which was the most challenging? Why? How’s it going finding vocabulary for your personal dictionary? Tell me how you are keeping track of the parallel storyline?
  • I ask students about their confidence levels in our little chats, and they tell me they know they have grown as a readers. This is the best kind of reward.
  • Try questions like: How has your confidence grown as you’ve read this year? What do you think is the one thing we’ve done in class that’s helped you improve so much as a reader? How will the habits you’ve created in class help you in the reading you’ll have to do in college? Why do you think you’ve grown so much as a reader the past few weeks? What’s different for you now in the way you learn than how you learned before? Describe for me the characteristics you have that make you a reader.
  • What kinds of questions work for you in your reading conferences?
Darrin Schumacher

Book Project - 71 views

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    We are looking at setting up an online book review where the students read a book and then do an electronic book review. If you would like to be a part of this project please email me on schumacherd@gsis.sc.kr One of the aims of the project is to see what read students are reading around the world and to encourage others to read a book that interests them. 
Tony Baldasaro

Inversions - Practical Theory - 1 views

  • Then, class, rather than being a time when all kids sat and received the instruction, could be the time when they reinforce skills by doing problem sets, worked on real-world application projects, collaborated with teachers to reinforce concepts, etc... in some ways, it's an inversion of what we traditionally think of as a math class.
  • If we use technology to invert that idea, so that kids could watch the teacher's demonstration of the skills and concepts at home (and with the ability to rewind when necessary,) we could allow kids the opportunity to apply and practice their knowledge in the space where they can get help, collaborate, etc... doesn't that make more sense? (Interestingly, I was trying to imagine what that would look like in an English classroom, and I realized that is, in many respects, similar to what we do alEnglishy when we ask kids to English the book at home, and then come in and interact with the community to uncover the deeper aspects of the text. Hm.)
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    I'm about 80% of the way through Disrupting Class by Clayton Christensen and Michael Horn. (Yeah, I know... I'm the last one to read it.) There's a lot that's very interesting about the book, and while we should critically examine the book, it is still a fascinating read. If nothing else, it is continuing to make me think about how much more could happen in our classrooms if we created more opportunities for students to learn basic skills and content outside of class, rather than inside class. I've been thinking a lot about math class. How many students would learn math more efficiently if they could watch math videos, narrated by a teacher with problems done "on the board" as they watched with multiple examples of concepts (think geometry here, as an example) that speak to different learning modalities.
victoria waddle

University students are struggling to read entire read | Education | News | The Independent - 47 views

  • Chantelle Francis, Academic and Inclusions Officer for the Sheffield University English Society, said: “I would argue that it is the time constraints that students struggle with as opposed to the actual material in most cases. I’m sure that if students had longer to English a text, they’d likely understand it better, because they’ve had more time to engage with it and appreciate it. But to suggest that students’ attention spans are low or that we are of insufficient ability is unfair.”
Martin Burrett

Litfy - E-books - 126 views

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    This is a great looking e-book site. View thousands of titles and read them online and on your portable device. You can also make notes on the pages. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/read
Enid Baines

Your Favorite: 100 Best-Ever Teen Novels - 92 views

  • Author Responds to Student Begging for Summary of Required Read
  • I love that teachers and writers admit to not reading read that were assigned. I wouldn't have read "The Scarlet Letter" either if I wasn't the one who had to assign it.
  • Guessing Game: ‘The Lord of the Rings’ as Written by Other Famous Authors - Flavorwire
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  • Some writers have distinct stylistic fingerprints. Student writers, not so much.
  • "Frodo Baggins looked at the ring. The ring was round. It was a good ring. The hole at the heart of the ring was also round. The hole was clean and pure. ... The earth moved."
  • Kids Hate Classic Books Through Hilarious Tweets at #worstbookever « PWxyz
  • The old man and the sea, #worstbookever uuuggghhhh
  • heart of darkness please die #worstbookever#whatsisgoingon?
  • thank god for sparknotes #readingthecrucible#worstbookever
  • endless editing. Anyone who writes a lot understands this
Erin DeBell

Direct Object Pronouns - 0 views

    • Erin DeBell
       
      I identify the Direct Object by finding the "main" verb of the sentence, the action verb.  In the highlighted sentence to the right, what is the main (or only) verb? HIT. To identify the D.O., ask yourself WHO or WHAT is being hit in this sentence? The ball.  Your Direct Object is THE BALL. What is the action verb in the next sentence? READS.  Ask yourself the question... Who or what is getting READ? The BOOK.  So the book is your D.O.   It's as easy as that.  If you can identify the main/action verb, you can identify the D.O.
  • Example 1
  • bought
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    • Erin DeBell
       
      What is the action verb in the first sentence? BOUGHT. What got bought in the sentence? FLOWERS. FLOWERS is your D.O.
  • When the pronoun replaces the name of the direct object, use the following pronouns:
  • me (me) te (you-familiar) lo, la (him, her, it, you-formal) nos (us) os (you-all-familiar) los, las (them, you-all-formal)
    • Erin DeBell
       
      PLACEMENT.  Important.  Where do you put the pronoun once you figure out what it is?
  • Look at how Spanish and English are different. "Lo tengo" and "La tengo" BOTH mean "I have it."
  • direct translation doesn't work so well:
  • La como.
  • This is completely incorrect!
  • Learn to translate groups of words, rather than individual words. The first step is to learn to view two Spanish words as a single phrase.
  • Just as no one has ever learned to ride a bicycle by reading about it, neither will you learn to use direct object pronouns simply by reading this lesson. The key to success, as always, is to practice, practice, practice.
    • Erin DeBell
       
      Do you feel like you understand Direct Objects?  Are you frustrated?  If so, how much have you practiced?  How many sample exercises have you done? If you read and take notes on a good explanation and then do some exercises, you will feel much more confident with the topic. 
    • Erin DeBell
       
      Try this simple, extremely helpful exercise: http://www.studyspanish.com/practice/dopro1.htm
Martin Burrett

Into the Book - 123 views

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    A beautifully made resource showing students the different elements of a book/story and provides ideas and vocabulary for them to talk about their learning. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/English
Trevor Cunningham

60second Recap® Video Notes. Everything you need to wow your English teacher! - 111 views

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    Be sure to diigo this site! You'll love it!! It recaps all your "favorite" novels!
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    60second Recap™ wants to make the great works of literature accessible, relevant, and, frankly, irresistible to today's teens. Through 60second Recap™ video albums, we seek to help teens engage with the best books out there ... not just to help them get better grades, but to help them build better lives.
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    Recaps many novels in a high school English curriculum
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    Video generated study guide for some of the top literature reads.The 60second Recap™ makes literature accessible, relevant, and, frankly, irresistible to today's teens.
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    Jenny goes beyond the books to help you excel in class. Tips on booksing, writing, and more.
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    While it certainly satisfies a new low in apathy and lethargy, eclipsing the likes of Sparks and Cliff Notes, it does present an outstanding project idea for a literature class.
Martin Burrett

Videos Book - 3 views

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    This is a great site to find audio and video versions of some children's classic books, many books by the authors. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/books
anonymous

The English Teacher's Companion - 0 views

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    New blog from Jim Burke, author of many books, bookscompanion.com, bookscompanion.ning.com
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    "Please turn on your textbooks and upload your homework..." In five years (three? two?!) I will not ask my high school students to open the 6.5 pound textbooks that currently sit on the floor under the desks. Nor will I bemoan their reluctance to look up words or mark up the text as they books. I will not wonder how to meet the needs of the 35% of my class who have learning disorders, most of which are language processing disorders of one form or another. Instead, I will ask them to get out their digital textbooks (what will we call them: Dbooks? DBs? ETexts? booksers?) and "books the assigned story." Here is what will be different:
Javier E

The Default Major - Skating Through B-School - NYTimes.com - 41 views

  • Dr. Mason, who teaches economics at the University of North Florida, believes his students are just as intelligent as they’ve always been. But many of them don’t read their textread, or do much of anything else that their parents would have called studying. “We used to complain that K-12 schools didn’t hold students to high standards,” he says with a sigh. “And here we are doing the same thing ourselves.”
  • all evidence suggests that student disengagement is at its worst in Dr. Mason’s domain: undergraduate business education.
  • “Business education has come to be defined in the minds of students as a place for developing elite social networks and getting access to corporate recruiters,”
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  • It’s an attitude that Dr. Khurana first saw in M.B.A. programs but has migrated, he says, to the undergraduate level.
  • Second, in management and marketing, no strong consensus has emerged about what students ought to learn or how they ought to learn it.
  • Gains on the C.L.A. closely parallel the amount of time students reported spending on homework. Another explanation is the heavy prevalence of group assignments in business courses: the more time students spent studying in groups, the weaker their gains in the kinds of skills the C.L.A. measures.
  • The pedagogical theory is that managers need to function in groups, so a management education without such experiences would be like medical training without a residency. While some group projects are genuinely challenging, the consensus among students and professors is that they are one of the elements of business that make it easy to skate through college.
  • “We’ve got students who don’t read, and grow up not reading,” he says. “There are too many other things competing for their time. The frequency and quantity of drinking keeps getting higher. We have issues with depression. Getting students alert and motivated — even getting them to class, to be honest with you — it’s a challenge.”
  • “A lot of classes I’ve been exposed to, you just go to class and they do the PowerPoint from the book,” he says. “It just seems kind of pointless to go when (a) you’re probably not going to be paying much attention anyway and (b) it would probably be worth more of your time just to sit with your book and read it.”
  • “It seems like now, every take-home test you get, you can just go and Google. If the question is from a test bank, you can just type the text in, and somebody out there will have it and you can just use that.”
  • This is not senioritis, he says: this is the way all four years have been. In a typical day, “I just play sports, maybe go to the gym. Eat. Probably drink a little bit. Just kind of goof around all day.” He says his grade-point average is 3.3.
  • concrete business skills tend to expire in five years or so as technology and organizations change.
  • History and philosophy, on the other hand, provide the kind of contextual knowledge and reasoning skills that are indispensable for business students.
  • when they hand in papers, they’re marked up twice: once for content by a professor with specialized expertise, and once for writing quality by a business-communication professor.
  • a national survey of 259 business professors who had been teaching for at least 10 years. On average, respondents said they had reduced the math and analytic-thinking requirements in their courses. In exchange, they had increased the number of requirements related to computer skills and group presentations.
  • what about employers? What do they want? According to national surveys, they want to hire 22-year-olds who can write coherently, think creatively and analyze quantitative data, and they’re perfectly happy to hire English or biology majors. Most Ivy League universities and elite liberal arts colleges, in fact, don’t even offer undergraduate business majors.
Marti Pike

RTI Talks | RTI for Gifted Students - 9 views

shared by Marti Pike on 02 Aug 17 - No Cached
  • learning contracts with the student focused on work that takes the students interests in to account may be helpful.
    • Marti Pike
       
      Genius Hour
  • "Up from Underachievement" by Diane Heacox
  • Gifted learners are rarely "globally gifted
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  • From a parent's perspective (and sometimes from the child's), this can seem like we are "de-gifted" the child.
  • The most important thing is that you have the "data" that shows what the student needs and that you are matching this with an appropriate service.
  • Be very explicit with what the differentiation is and how it is addressing the needs
  • A major shift with RTI is that there is less emphasis on the "label" and more on the provision of appropriate service.
  • When a child has met all the expected benchmarks
  • independent reading
  • reading log
  • small group for discussions using similar questions.
  • long-term solutions might include forming a seminar group using a
  • program like "Junior Great Books."
  • Ideas for differentiating reading for young children can also be found at: http://www.k8accesscenter.org/training_resources/readingdifferentiation.asp http://www.appomattox.k12.va.us/acps/attachments/6_6_12_dan_mulligan_handout.pdf
  • enrich potential
  • to plan appropriate instruction, based on data that show the learners' needs.
  • additional enrichment and challenge in their area(s) strength.
  • Tiers 2 or 3
  • As the intensity of the needs increase, the intensity of the services also increases.
  • our ability to nurture potential in students prior to formal identification
  • appropriately scaffolded activities through Tier 2 support.
  • , with high-end differentiation and expectations, we are able to support the development of potential in all students.
  • This body-of-evidence can be used to support the nomination process and formal identification when appropriate.
  • likely to be of particular benefit for culturally and linguistically diverse, economically disadvantaged, and twice exceptional youngsters who are currently underrepresented within gifted education.
  • Tier 1 include:
  • Tier 2 include:
  • Tier 3 include:
  • universal screening
  • Aspergers
  • gifted children with learning disabilities?
  • If we provide enrichment activities for our advanced students, won't that just increase the acheivement gap?
    • Marti Pike
       
      Grrrrrrrrr
  • Educational opportunities are not a “zero sum” game where some students gain and others lose.
  • the needs of all learners.
  • One is focusing on remediation, however the second approach focuses on the nurturing of potential through creating expectations for excellence that permeate Tier 1 with extended opportunities for enrichment for all children who need them at Tier 2. With the focus on excellence, the rising tide will help all students reach their potential. This is the goal of education.
  • make sure that the screener is directly related to the curriculum that you are using and that it has a high enough ceiling to allow advance learners to show what they know.
  • recognizing that students who are above grade level, or advanced in their academics, also need support to thrive
  • all students deserve to attend a school where their learning needs are met
  • seek out ways to build the knowledge and skills of teachers to address the range of needs
  • This includes learning about differentiated instruction within Tier 1and creating additional opportunities for enhancements and enrichments within Tier 2.
  • first
  • This often means that the district views the school as a “high-needs” school and does feel that many children would qualify for gifted education services (thus no teacher allocation is warranted). If this is the case, then this is a problematic view as it perpetuates the myth that some groups of children are not likely to be “gifted”.
  • These five differentiation strategies are as follows: Curriculum Compacting (pre-assessment of learners to see what they know)  The use of Tiered Assignments that address: Mastery, Enrichment, and Challenge  Tiered Learning Centers that allow children to further explore skills and concepts  Independent and Small group learning contracts that allow students to follow area of interest  Questioning for Higher Level thinking to stretch the minds of each child.
  • RTI was,
  • first proposed as a way to help us better identify students who continue to need additional support in spite of having appropriate instructional opportunities to learn.
  • The primary issue is the need for measures of potential as well as performance.
  • an IQ measure
  • portfolio
  • that sometimes occur outside of school
  • children with complex sets of strengths and needs require a comprehensive evaluation that includes multiple types, sources, and time periods to create the most accurate and complete understanding of their educational needs.
  • a "diamond" shaped RTI model
  • confusing
  • use the same icon to represent how we address the increasing intensity of academic and behavioral needs for all learners.
  • English Language Learners?
  • Differentiated instruction is part of a strength-based approach to Tier 1, providing enriched and challenging learning opportunities for all students. However, a comprehensive RTI approach for gifted learners will also need strong Tier 2 and 3 supports and services.
  • Tracking, or the fixed stratification of children into learning levels based on limited data (placing children in fixed learning groups based on a single reading score), is the opposite of RTI.
  • off grade level trajectories
  • this may includ
  • assess the slope and speed of learning and plot the target from there.
  • content acceleration and content enrichment.
  • independent or small group project of their choice.
  • renzullilearning.com.
  • additional learning opportunities that both challenge the learner and address high interest learning topics.
Catherine Hainstock

Viewing through Picture Books - 8 views

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    An excellent site with resources for using picture books with adolescents for literature/books sessions.
victoria waddle

Teen/YA book reviews - 43 views

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    I've been reviewing books for teens for several years, and I hope you'll have a look. These are mostly teen fiction, but there is also nonfiction, adult books that have teen appeal and hi-lo books for books learners and other working on booksing skills.
Martin Burrett

Sebastian Swan ebooks - 74 views

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    A good collection of online books for young booksers. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/books
Martin Burrett

Hot Free Books - 119 views

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    A good site to find online ebooks of classic titles. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/books
Deborah Baillesderr

CAST: Center for Applied Special Technology - 117 views

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    WOW! Free tools related to literacy skills. The book builder tool has a section which reads a story (here's a link for "A Tortoise and a Hare") - They offer professional development and multimedia learning tools. ....."A Tortoise and a Hare" - just this one book offers an amazing variety of learning tools including: activating background knowledge, self assessment and reflection, collaboration and communication, action and expression, coping skills and strategies, challenge and support, recruiting interest, goal-centered learning, and designing flexible curriculum. Each of these skills has a specific activity within the story to address it (almost every page has a different one!). Every page also has a question to think about and respond to. At the end it discusses the moral in another activity and the story itself offers extension activities for follow-up. The story is read by a young girl, but there is also a text reader built in, a glossary, and word-by-word read/Spanish translations.
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    This is great. Good for educators, parents, and students. The book builder thing is cool!
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    An educational research & development organization that works to expand learning opportunities for all individuals through Universal Design for Learning.
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    CAST is an educational research & development organization that works to expand learning opportunities for all individuals through Universal Design for Learning.
Martin Burrett

Online Storytime - 117 views

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    A great set of video of classic book titles, such as The Very Hungry Caterpillar and Green Ham and Eggs. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/English
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