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Martin Burrett

Nova Elements - 13 views

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    "A great chemistry app for PC, Mac and iPad which lets you explore the molecular composition of everyday objects."
Martin Burrett

Helping Troubled Pupils - 7 views

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    "We all hide things. From our friends and even from ourselves. Because of this, the pupils showing clear signs of distress and of need of social and/or emotional support are probably only a fraction of the real need at any one time. We also all experience difficulties at times, yet the object of our distress is often fleeting, or in hindsight trivial in the grand scheme of things. However, many of the young people we teach have chronically stressful situations to deal with on a daily basis, both at home and at school. This can exhibit in the classroom as anxiety, poor concentration or disruptive behaviour."
acarraro

Intrinsic Locks and Synchronization (The Java™ Tutorials > Essential Classes > Concurrency) - 3 views

  • When a thread releases an intrinsic lock, a happens-before relationship is established between that action and any subsequent acquisition of the same lock.
    • acarraro
       
      Come un commit di una transazione
  • When a thread invokes a synchronized method, it automatically acquires the intrinsic lock for that method's object and releases it when the method returns. The lock release occurs even if the return was caused by an uncaught exception.
  • what happens when a static synchronized method is invoked
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  • public void addName(String name) { synchronized(this) { lastName = name; nameCount++; } nameList.add(name); }
  • Allowing a thread to acquire the same lock more than once enables reentrant synchronization.
Martin Burrett

Mecabricks - 16 views

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    "Build models of virtual lego and share with your pupils. Great for creating objects for your lessons. Browse/edit the bank from other users."
Ryan Evans

10 Best Practices for Implementing Gamification - 15 views

  • make sure you know what constitutes success.
  • Only use gamification as a learning solution when it makes sense and resonates with learners. 
  • Explain why the learners are earning points, who they are trying to save, why they are searching for a treasure. Remember, gamification works well when it is within a context—create a reason why learners should interact with the content you have created.
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  • Retrieval practice requires learners to recall information rather than simply re-read or re-listen to it.
  • The learners should be able to directly link their actions and activities to a score so they know what they need to do to be successful.
  • Keep leaderboards small
  • Use levels and badges appropriately
  • Let the learner know how many levels they are going to need to complete before the learning is over.
  • Badges, on the other hand, are good for showing non-linear progress. Badges can be tied to either terminal or enabling objectives. Also, if possible provide a place where learners can “show off” badges to leverage the social effectiveness of gamification. 
  • Bonus: monitor learner progress
clbrink

7 Key Considerations for Online and Blended Learning Programs -- THE Journal - 19 views

  • Online courses provide students with a level of flexibility and choice
    • clbrink
       
      This is true....choice and voice are important 
  • Infuse digital literacy and citizenship into your online strategy. "
  • Find a good partner to work with
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  • Reach out when students appear to be struggling.
  • Use online learning to reach a more diverse group of learners.
  • Put a spotlight on interpersonal communications.
  • strong collaboration between students, teachers and parents.
  • . The discussions are asynchronous, so students can share their input when it best suits them.
  • Outline the virtual school's objectives and goals early in the game.
  • discipline, commitment, and organization are key traits for any successful student,
  • four- to five-day orientation course
    • clbrink
       
      Should we be doing this in CAA?
Gareth Jones

Looking in the Wrong Places | Edge.org - 5 views

  • We should be very careful in thinking about whether we’re working on the right problems. If we don’t, that ties into the problem that we don’t have experimental evidence that could move us forward. We're trying to develop theories that we use to find out which are good experiments to make, and these are the experiments that we build.   We build particle detectors and try to find dark matter; we build larger colliders in the hope of producing new particles; we shoot satellites into orbit and try to look back into the early universe, and we do that because we hope there’s something new to find there. We think there is because we have some idea from the theories that we’ve been working on that this would be something good to probe. If we are working with the wrong theories, we are making the wrong extrapolations, we have the wrong expectations, we make the wrong experiments, and then we don’t get any new data. We have no guidance to develop these theories. So, it’s a chicken and egg problem. We have to break the cycle. I don’t have a miracle cure to these problems. These are hard problems. It’s not clear what a good theory is to develop. I’m not any wiser than all the other 20,000 people in the field.
  • I’m still asking myself the same question that I asked myself ten years ago: "What is going on in my community?" I work in the foundations of physics, and I see a lot of strange things happening there. When I look at the papers that are being published, many of them seem to be produced simply because papers have to be produced. They don’t move us forward in any significant way. I get the impression that people are working on them not so much because it’s what they’re interested in but because they have to produce outcomes in a short amount of time. They sit on short-term positions and have short-term contracts, and papers must be produced.
  • The field that I mostly work in is the foundations of physics, which is, roughly speaking, composed of cosmology, the foundations of quantum mechanics, high-energy particle physics, and quantum gravity. It’s a peculiar field because there hasn’t been new data for almost four decades, since we established the Standard Model of particle physics. There has been, of course, the Higgs particle that was discovered at the LHC in 2012, and there have been some additions to the Standard Model, but there has not been a great new paradigm change, as Kuhn would have put it. We’re still using the same techniques, and we’re still working with the same theories as we did in the 1970s.
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  • That makes this field of science rather peculiar and probably explains why there hasn’t been much progress. But it’s not like we don’t have any questions that need to be answered. There are a lot of questions that have been around for decades. For example, what is dark energy? What is dark matter? What are the masses of the Standard Model particles? And what’s up with the foundation of quantum mechanics? Is a theory that's fundamentally not deterministic, where we cannot predict outcomes, the last word that we have, or is there something more to it? Is there maybe another underlying structure to reality?
  • but we haven't reached the fundamental level. Maybe we will never reach it. Certainly, the theories that we have right now are not all there is. The question is, of course, if we don’t have any guidance by experiment, how do we make progress? And are we doing the right thing?
  • We’ve reached this point where we have to carefully rethink if the criteria that we’re using to select our theories are promising at all. If one looks at the history of this field in the foundations of physics, progress has usually been made by looking at questions that, at least in hindsight, were well posed, where there was an actual mathematical contradiction. For example, special relativity is incompatible with Newtonian gravity. If you try to resolve this incompatibility, you get general relativity.
  • There are various similar examples where such breakthroughs have happened because there was a real problem. There was an inconsistency and people had to resolve it. It had nothing to do with beauty. Maybe beauty was, in some cases, the personal motivation of the people to work on it. There’s certainly some truth to this, but I don’t think it’s good to turn this story around and say that if we only pay attention to this motivation that comes from ideals of beauty it will lead to progress.
  • If we are working with the wrong theories, we are making the wrong extrapolations, we have the wrong expectations, we make the wrong experiments, and then we don’t get any new data. We have no guidance to develop these theories. So, it’s a chicken and egg problem. We have to break the cycle. I don’t have a miracle cure to these problems. These are hard problems. It’s not clear what a good theory is to develop. I’m not any wiser than all the other 20,000 people in the field.
  • The way that research is funded in foundations of physics and in many other fields just puts a lot of things at a disadvantage that are not pursued anymore. Typically, everything that takes longer than three years to complete, no one will start it because they can’t afford it. They can literally not afford it.
  • Who makes the decisions about the funding? Superficially, people say that it's a funding agency, so it’s the university who get to hire people. But that puts the blame on the wrong party. In the end it’s the community itself who makes the decisions. What do the funding agencies do if they get a proposal? They send it to reviewers. And who are the reviewers? They're people from the same community. If you look at how hiring decisions are being made, there’s some committee and they are people from the same community. They have some advisory boards or something, which contains people from the same community.
  • Even if that wasn’t so, what the people in these committees would be doing is looking at easy measures for scientific success. Presently, the most popular of these measures are the number of publications and the number of citations. And maybe also whether the person has published in high-impact journals. So, these are the typical measures that are presently being used. But what do they measure? They primarily measure popularity. They indicate whether somebody’s research is well received by a lot of people in the same community. And that’s why once a research area grows beyond a certain critical mass, you have sufficiently many people who tell each other that what they’re doing is the good thing to do. They review each other’s papers and say that that’s great and it's what we should continue to do. It’s a problem in all communities that grow beyond a certain size.
  • I later came to the United States and then Canada, and that gave me the opportunity to learn a lot about quantum gravity. I also figured out that much of what goes on in quantum gravity is very detached from reality. It’s pretty much only mathematics. Yes, the mathematics is there, but I still don’t know if it’s the mathematics that describes reality.
  • That’s the very reason why we don’t normally think of gravity as a weak force. It’s the only force that is left over on long distances, and the reason for this is that it adds up. It gets stronger the more mass you pile up. More precisely, we should say that the reason we find it so hard to measure quantum gravitational effects is that we either have a particle that has very pronounced quantum properties, like, say, a single electron or something like that, but then it’s so light that we cannot measure the gravitational field. Or we have some object that is so heavy that we can measure the gravitational field, but then it doesn’t have quantum properties. Okay, so that’s the actual problem.
Martin Burrett

Helping schools comply with GDPR - 5 views

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    "You may be aware that in May 2018, the regulations regarding data protection in the United Kingdom will change, becoming the General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR). This means the way you manage all data and information within your school will also be changing. Once the new regulations come into force, schools will have a number of objectives to meet regarding the accuracy and security of the data held on their pupils, parents and staff."
Martin Burrett

Good, Great, Fantastic… by @keeponteeping - 21 views

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    "I was introduced to the Good/Great/Awesome techniques in some TEEP training in November last year. I immediately placed it in my "to-do right away" pile. As an intrinsically positive person, and teacher, who always strives to build students' self esteem and promote the growth mindset in all who pass through my classroom; I found the idea of offering 3 levels of positivity much more appealing that the previous wording. I implemented this strategy quickly and personally added in an overarching learning objective, so students could see each stage of G/G/F as building blocks. I coloured coded them, as is common, and occasionally colour coordinate to grades or tasks."
Martin Burrett

Sketchfab British Museum - 17 views

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    "View over 200 3D models of historical objects from the British Museum. Manipulate the models online, view using Google Cardboard and download the models to print on a 3D printer."
gardali

Using Bloom's Taxonomy to Write Effective Learning Objectives | TIPS - 61 views

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    Writing Objectives Using Bloom's Taxonomy
Martin Burrett

Color Pop Effects - 25 views

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    A great iOS and Android app for editing photos and images to show only selected objects in colour on an otherwise monochrome image. Start with a completely greyscale image and add the colours back by moving your finger over the areas you want.
Nigel Coutts

Tinkering with Old Technology - The Learner's Way - 27 views

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    As technology evolves and its inner workings increasingly disappear from view, replaced with solid-state parts hidden by glass, aluminium and plastic, our understanding of what makes the world operate is similarly impeded. When machinery from just a few decades ago is viewed a world of moving parts, linkages, cogs and levers is revealed. These mechanical objects contain an inherent beauty and inspire curiosity in ways that modern devices with their pristine surfaces and simplified design language do not. Opportunities to explore devices from the past open our eyes and lead us to new questions of how our devices function, how machines do the jobs we need them to do and how engineers solve problems.
Mark Glynn

ERIC - Enhancing the Impact of Formative Feedback on Student Learning through an Online Feedback System, Electronic Journal of e-Learning, 2010 - 49 views

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    "Formative feedback is instrumental in the learning experience of a student. It can be effective in promoting learning if it is timely, personal, manageable, motivational, and in direct relation with assessment criteria. Despite its importance, however, research suggests that students are discouraged from engaging in the feedback process primarily for reasons that relate to lack of motivation and difficulty in relating to and reflecting on the feedback comments. In this paper we present Online FEdback System (OFES), an e-learning tool that effectively supports the provision of formative feedback. Our aims are to enhance feedback reception and to strengthen the quality of feedback through the way feedback is communicated to the students. We propose that an effective feedback communication mechanism should be integrated into a student's online learning space and it is anticipated that this provision will motivate students to engage with feedback. Empirical evidence suggests that the developed system successfully addressed the issues of student engagement and motivation and achieved its objectives. The results of using the system for two years indicate a positive perception of the students which, in turn, encourage us to further explore its effectiveness by extending its functionality and integrating it into a an open source learning management system"
Martin Burrett

Google Museum of the World - 86 views

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    A superb site from Google and the British museum. An interactive timeline of interconnected historical objects from all over the world. Click on them to view details.
Martin Burrett

YAKiT Kids - 50 views

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    Apple app for animating photos by adding talking mouths and eyes to inanimate objects. Record audio for the objects to say to make explanation videos and more.
Glenn Hervieux

Why your tech PD might be all wrong | eSchool News - 72 views

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    Tech training and PD should be about more than the device; it should have purpose. The key to professional learning is having an objective for your learning and then time to apply what you've learned. It does take time!
Glenn Hervieux

App Recommendations for Mobile Devices - 78 views

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    Classroom Apps Find educational apps for iPads, Chromebooks, Androids and Laptops but first start with a learning objective in mind.
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