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Mrs. Lail2

How Self-Expression Damaged My Students - Robert Pondiscio - The Atlantic - 47 views

  • But good writers don't just do stuff. They know stuff. They have knowledge of the world that enlivens their prose and provides the ability to create examples and analogies. They have big vocabularies and solid command of the conventions of language and grammar. And if this is not explicitly taught, it will rarely develop by osmosis among children who do not grow up in language-rich homes.
  • But good writers don't just do stuff. They know stuff. They have knowledge of the world that enlivens their prose and provides the ability to create examples and analogies. They have big vocabularies and solid command of the conventions of language and grammar. And if this is not explicitly taught, it will rarely develop by osmosis among children who do not grow up in language-rich homes.
  • But good writers don't just do stuff. They know stuff. They have knowledge of the world that enlivens their prose and provides the ability to create examples and analogies. They have big vocabularies and solid command of the conventions of language and grammar. And if this is not explicitly taught, it will rarely develop by osmosis among children who do not grow up in language-rich homes.
  • ...7 more annotations...
  • But good writers don't just do stuff. They know stuff. They have knowledge of the world that enlivens their prose and provides the ability to create examples and analogies. They have big vocabularies and solid command of the conventions of language and grammar. And if this is not explicitly taught, it will rarely develop by osmosis among children who do not grow up in language-rich homes.
  • But good writers don't just do stuff. They know stuff. They have knowledge of the world that enlivens their prose and provides the ability to create examples and analogies. They have big vocabularies and solid command of the conventions of language and grammar. And if this is not explicitly taught, it will rarely develop by osmosis among children who do not grow up in language-rich homes.
  • But good writers don't just do stuff. They know stuff. They have knowledge of the world that enlivens their prose and provides the ability to create examples and analogies. They have big vocabularies and solid command of the conventions of language and grammar. And if this is not explicitly taught, it will rarely develop by osmosis among children who do not grow up in language-rich homes.
  • But good writers don't just do stuff. They know stuff. They have knowledge of the world that enlivens their prose and provides the ability to create examples and analogies. They have big vocabularies and solid command of the conventions of language and grammar. And if this is not explicitly taught, it will rarely develop by osmosis among children who do not grow up in language-rich homes.
  • But good writers don't just do stuff. They know stuff. They have knowledge of the world that enlivens their prose and provides the ability to create examples and analogies. They have big vocabularies and solid command of the conventions of language and grammar. And if this is not explicitly taught, it will rarely develop by osmosis among children who do not grow up in language-rich homes.
  • But good writers don't just do stuff. They know stuff. They have knowledge of the world that enlivens their prose and provides the ability to create examples and analogies. They have big vocabularies and solid command of the conventions of language and grammar. And if this is not explicitly taught, it will rarely develop by osmosis among children who do not grow up in language-rich homes.
  • But good writers don't just do stuff. They know stuff. They have knowledge of the world that enlivens their prose and provides the ability to create examples and analogies. They have big vocabularies and solid command of the conventions of language and grammar. And if this is not explicitly taught, it will rarely develop by osmosis among children who do not grow up in language-rich homes.
Julia Gardiner

Lateline - 29/10/2012: PMs plan for every child to learn an Asian language - 14 views

    • Julia Gardiner
       
      The rationale or thinking behind introducing languages early in primary school
  • Gillard Government's Asian Century white paper sets an aspiration for Australia to rank as the world's 10th biggest economy by 2025, capitalising on the rapid economic growth in the region.
  • education will be the key and wants all school students to study an Asian language.
  • ...24 more annotations...
  • funded
  • where all the new teachers might come from
  • where all the new teachers might come from.
  • the gold standard
    • Julia Gardiner
       
       The gold standard =any excellent example of something, like how Olympians are the gold standard for athletes
  • If you understand through the learning of language how people think, how they construct meaning, what is important to them culturally, then I think that gives us better insights into the people that we're going to be working with in the future and negotiating with.
  • The Prime Minister says she'll force the curriculum changes by tying them to Commonwealth funding to state and private schools.
    • Julia Gardiner
       
      Is this  good policy making? Some would  consider  it 'blackmail'!
  • Broadly, teachers and education experts have welcomed the plan, but question where the money is going to come from.
  • catchcry of the Hawke and Keating governments
    • Julia Gardiner
       
      The Hawke-Keating Government refers to the Federal Government of Australia from 11 March 1983 to 11 March 1996. It was a Labour government
  • Currently across all levels of schooling there's around 18 per cent of our young people who are studying one of the four priority Asian languages: Mandarin Chinese, Japanese, Indonesian and Korean. And that diminishes to fewer than 6 per cent by the time they get to Year 12.
    • Julia Gardiner
       
      How do we encourage students to  continue  learning an Asian language into the final years  of high school and  eyond?
  • say we simply don't have enough Asian language teachers to deliver the Prime Minister's vision and for the last decade the numbers of graduates have been declining.
  • hat's happened because universities have been under these budget constraints and when they've made decisions about what to cut, they cut courses with low enrolments and there goes the languages.
  • JEANNIE REA, PRESIDENT, NATIONAL TERTIARY EDUCATION UNION
    • Julia Gardiner
       
      Suggested reasons for the decline in language graduates and therefore  in language teachers. 
  • will help.JULIA GILLARD: We live in an age of different learning possibilities and choices. What we can do through the National Broadband Network, what we can do through having the world's first online national curriculum, which is what the Australian curriculum is, means we can get a deeper penetration of language, literacy and learning.
  • e Prime Minister acknowledges the shortages, but says technology
  • will help.
    • Julia Gardiner
       
      This argument t can be debated.  It would suggest that technology in itself will be a solution!
  • we need to be looking very carefully at what sort of encouragement and incentives we can provide to students so they continue doing a language, go on and major in a language in university and then go on to teach in the area.
  • JEANNIE REA:
    • Julia Gardiner
       
      What type of incentive scan be offered/
  •  
    The Prime Minister wants all school students to study an Asian language to secure Australia's future in the Asian Century.
  •  
    Completely deluded. Even here in Singapore, surrounded supposedly by chinese speakers the international schools are not getting it right and success stories are unusual ...
Don Doehla

For Young ELLs, Learning in Two Languages Best, Review Says - Learning the Language - Education Week - 16 views

  •  
    "nstruction in English and in a child's home language in the preschool and early elementary years leads to the best outcomes for the youngest dual-language learners, both in terms of academic-content achievement and as English-language proficiency, a new research review and policy brief concludes."
tab_ras

BBC News - Language universality idea tested with biology method - 18 views

  •  
    A long-standing idea that human languages share universal features that are dictated by human brain structure has been cast into doubt. A study reported in Nature has borrowed methods from evolutionary biology to trace the development of grammar in several language families. The results suggest that features shared across language families evolved independently in each lineage. The authors say cultural evolution, not the brain, drives language development.
Martin Burrett

Bilingual children learn other languages easier - 15 views

  •  
    "It is often claimed that people who are bilingual are better than monolinguals at learning languages. Now, the first study to examine bilingual and monolingual brains as they learn an additional language offers new evidence that supports this hypothesis, researchers say. The study, conducted at Georgetown University Medical Center and published in the journal Bilingualism: language and Cognition, suggests that early bilingualism helps with learning languages later in life."
Martin Burrett

Microsoft Language Labs - Translator Bookmarklet - 30 views

  •  
    A good, simple browser translation tool from Microsoft. The bookmarklet sits in your bookmark toolbar and translates foreign pages into your language with one click. Choose a language from the drop down menu to translate into other languages. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/languages%2C+Culture+%26+International+Projects
Stephanie Holt

The Americans Are Ruining Our Language | The Fifth Columnist - 2 views

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    First of all, nobody's ruining the English language. And for anyone to call it "our" language is repugnantly colonial. language spreads and language changes. English is spoken across the globe by m...
Martin Burrett

Language Teaching: A Practical approach by @Natalieburdett9 - 8 views

  •  
    "As I stood in the school hall, during an assembly on National Languages Day, I felt such pride, but equally astonishment at how the children had embraced the task of saying hello in as many Languages as possible. I watched in amazement as the 34th child stood up in front of the school to share his knowledge of yet another greeting from a different country. I don't know whether it was the sheer volume of children or their confidence whilst standing in front of the school and speak a different Language that struck me most, but whatever it was, made me reflect on how I had come to be in this moment."
Virginia Meadow

eChalk: Teaching resources for interactive whiteboards and data projectors - 2 views

  •  
    Powerful interactive resources designed for whole-class teaching. Online educational games, classroom resources and lesson activities for interactive whiteboards and data projectors. Put some fun into your lessons with our exceptional science, maths, English language, literature, history, music physical education and modern foreign languages software." />/css/resourceList.css
Michelle Kassorla

Omniglot - 87 views

  •  
    The Online Encyclopedia of Writing Systems and Languages Alphabets and other writing systems Writing & Speech | Types of writing systems | Abjads | Alphabets | Alphasyllabaries | Syllabaries | Semanto-phonetic scripts | Undeciphered scripts | Alternative scripts | A-Z index | Direction index Constructed scripts For natural Languages | For conlangs | Phonetic scripts | Adapted scripts | Fictional scripts Languages Tips on learning Languages | Language-related articles | Celtic Languages | Alphabetic index | Index by writing system | Videos Language learning software | Learn Hebrew online Multilingual pages Useful phrases | Idioms | Numerals | Numbers | Colours | Kinship terms | Signs | Tongue twisters | Language names | Country names | UDHR | Tower of Babel | Songs
elsjekool

Paul Ford: What is Code? | Bloomberg - 35 views

  • There are keynote speakers—often the people who created the technology at hand or crafted a given language. There are the regular speakers, often paid not at all or in airfare, who present some idea or technique or approach. Then there are the panels, where a group of people are lined up in a row and forced into some semblance of interaction while the audience checks its e-mail.
  • Fewer than a fifth of undergraduate degrees in computer science awarded in 2012 went to women, according to the National Center for Women & Information Technology
  • The average programmer is moderately diligent, capable of basic mathematics, has a working knowledge of one or more programming languages, and can communicate what he or she is doing to management and his or her peers
  • ...16 more annotations...
  • The true measure of a language isn’t how it uses semicolons; it’s the standard library of each language. A language is software for making software. The standard library is a set of premade software that you can reuse and reapply.
  • A coder needs to be able to quickly examine and identify which giant, complex library is the one that’s the most recently and actively updated and the best match for his or her current needs. A coder needs to be a good listener.
  • Code isn’t just obscure commands in a file. It requires you to have a map in your head, to know where the good libraries, the best documentation, and the most helpful message boards are located. If you don’t know where those things are, you will spend all of your time searching, instead of building cool new things.
  • Some tools are better for certain jobs.
  • C is a simple language, simple like a shotgun that can blow off your foot. It allows you to manage every last part of a computer—the memory, files, a hard drive—which is great if you’re meticulous and dangerous if you’re sloppy
  • Object-oriented programming is, at its essence, a filing system for code.
  • Where C tried to make it easier to do computer things, Smalltalk tried to make it easier to do human things.
  • Style and usage matter; sometimes programmers recommend Strunk & White’s The Elements of Style—that’s right, the one about the English language. Its focus on efficient usage resonates with programmers. The idiom of a language is part of its communal identity.
  • Coding is a culture of blurters.
  • Programmers carve out a sliver of cognitive territory for themselves and go to conferences, and yet they know their position is vulnerable.
  • Programmers are often angry because they’re often scared.
  • Programming is a task that rewards intense focus and can be done with a small group or even in isolation.
  • For a truly gifted programmer, writing code is a side effect of thought
  • As a class, programmers are easily bored, love novelty, and are obsessed with various forms of productivity enhancement.
  • “Most programming languages are partly a way of expressing things in terms of other things and partly a basic set of given things.”
  • Of course, while we were trying to build a bookstore, we actually built the death of bookstores—that seems to happen a lot in the business. You set out to do something cool and end up destroying lots of things that came before.
  •  
    A lengthy but worthy read for all non-programmers on code.
  •  
    Explains code
tab_ras

Voki in the Languages Classroom « Voki for Education Blog - 20 views

  •  
    The ability to speak the foreign language in question can safely be described as the principal objective of learning foreign languages. However, it can often prove difficult to assess your pupils' ability to speak the foreign language in the classroom, as time and numbers often conspire against us.
tab_ras

The use of social networking sites for foreign language learning: An autoethnographic study of Livemocha - 19 views

  •  
    Despite their spectacular growth in both daily life and mainstream education, little research to date has been conducted concerning the use of social networking sites in foreign language learning. The aim of this study, therefore, is to examine the use of such sites to learn a foreign language. Using an auto-ethnographic approach that included self-aware participation, learner diaries and peer debriefing, we investigated the social networking site Livemocha to study Korean from our perspectives as native speakers and experienced teachers of English. Specifically, we focused our questions on aspects of socio-collaborative principles and practice. Results of a grounded, thematic analysis indicate that the site had number of counter-productive pedagogical impediments to language learning that included, for example, flaws in site design. We conclude our paper with suggestions for improved foreign language learning through social networking sites.
Cüneyt Birkök

International Journal of Human Sciences - 18 views

  • ©2002 Uluslararası İnsan Bilimleri Dergisi / International Journal of Human Sciences (ISSN:1303-5134) is an "Open access journal" that uses a funding model that does not charge readers or their institutions for access. From the BOAI definition of open access, users take the right of read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of these articles.
  •  
    ©2002 International Journal of Human Sciences (ISSN:1303-5134) is an "Open access journal" that uses a funding model that does not charge readers or their institutions for access. From the BOAI definition of open access, users take the right of read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of these articles. Creative Commons License # We look forward to work with scholars from all over the world and in any subject fields. All academicians (hold a Ph.D degree) are welcomed. # Refereeing pre-request is to supervise at least three (Master) or (Doctoral) thesis. # We elaborate scientific branches mentioned in the about page according to any requests from referees. # Referees are responsible to review and approve submitted works in English language and subject fields by filling out this evaluation form. # To join with editorial board, Login/Register to this journal and then submit your full academic vitae with your subject fields you are able to review to journal editor (editor@insanbilimleri.com). Please fill completely out all the information asked (such as your bio statement, languages, institution etc.) at user profile page.
  •  
    ©2002 International Journal of Human Sciences (ISSN:1303-5134) is an "Open access journal" that uses a funding model that does not charge readers or their institutions for access. From the BOAI definition of open access, users take the right of read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of these articles. Creative Commons License # We look forward to work with scholars from all over the world and in any subject fields. All academicians (hold a Ph.D degree) are welcomed. # Refereeing pre-request is to supervise at least three (Master) or (Doctoral) thesis. # We elaborate scientific branches mentioned in the about page according to any requests from referees. # Referees are responsible to review and approve submitted works in English language and subject fields by filling out this evaluation form. # To join with editorial board, Login/Register to this journal and then submit your full academic vitae with your subject fields you are able to review to journal editor (editor@insanbilimleri.com). Please fill completely out all the information asked (such as your bio statement, languages, institution etc.) at user profile page.
  •  
    ©2002 International Journal of Human Sciences (ISSN:1303-5134) is an "Open access journal" that uses a funding model that does not charge readers or their institutions for access. From the BOAI definition of open access, users take the right of read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of these articles. Creative Commons License # We look forward to work with scholars from all over the world and in any subject fields. All academicians (hold a Ph.D degree) are welcomed. # Refereeing pre-request is to supervise at least three (Master) or (Doctoral) thesis. # We elaborate scientific branches mentioned in the about page according to any requests from referees. # Referees are responsible to review and approve submitted works in English language and subject fields by filling out this evaluation form. # To join with editorial board, Login/Register to this journal and then submit your full academic vitae with your subject fields you are able to review to journal editor (editor@insanbilimleri.com). Please fill completely out all the information asked (such as your bio statement, languages, institution etc.) at user profile page.
Martin Burrett

Endangered Languages - 39 views

  •  
    A fascinating site that explores endangered languages. Read information and the demographics of the remaining speakers and watch video clips of some phrases. Why not try something different for your 'language of the week'. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/languages%2C+Culture+%26+International+Projects
Martin Burrett

MYLO: a new way to learn languages - 84 views

  •  
    A fabulous language site with sections for French, Spanish, German and Chinese. Learn language topics and play quizzes to test what you have learnt. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/languages%2C+Culture+%26+International+Projects
Don Doehla

Found in Translation - 28 views

  •  
    Language life at UC Berkeley and beyond. Relfections on meaning, Language use, cultural means of expression, status of Languages, and more.
tab_ras

NCLRC - The Essentials of Language Teaching - 37 views

  •  
    This site gives college and university instructors and teaching assistants an introduction to the language teaching methods that are currently used in U.S. universities. The content is based on the material in Modules for the Professional Preparation of Teaching Assistants in Foreign languages (Grace Stovall Burkart, ed.; Center for Applied Linguistics, 1998). The site was developed for the National Capital language Resource Center (NCLRC) by Catharine Keatley and Deborah Kennedy under a grant from the U.S. Department of Education, CFDA #84.015A.
Norma Moore

Yabla - Language Immersion - Learn Languages with Authentic Videos - 88 views

  •  
    Language Immersion Through Online Video The revolutionary way to immerse yourself in a foreign Language is here! Only Yabla Language immersion sites give you authentic television, music videos, drama, interviews, travel, and Yabla exclusive shoots from throughout the world. Our unique player technology is designed with Language learners in mind: Slow Play, Integrated Dictionaries, Listening Game, Dual Language Subtitles, and more.
david ellis

Netvibes (124) - 1 views

shared by david ellis on 22 Apr 09 - Cached
  • Programming -OK, on the programming thing, here are my thoughts.In our curriculum our objective is not as much a specific LANGUAGE. One year I may use HTML with Javascript, this past year I used LSL — what I want kids to know that when they encounter programming and coding that there are certain conventions. Some are case sensitive, some are not. How do you find out how to add to what you know about programming? Do you know where to go to find prewritten code? Can you hack it to make it work to do what you want it to do?We spend about a week – two weeks but I require they know how to handcode hyperlinks and images – they are just too important.But to take 12 weeks or 6 weeks to learn a whole LANGUAGE – yes maybe some value – but to me the value is HOW is the LANGUAGE constructed or built. What are the conventions and how do I educate myself if I am interested in pursuing. What comes out of this time is kids who say either “I never want to do that” or “this is really cool, I love coding.”They are doing very simplistic work (although the LSL object LANGUAGEs were pretty advanced) but since we don’t have a full course nor time in our curriculum, I do see this as an essential part of what I teach.I’m not teaching it for the LANGUAGE sake but for the sake of understanding the whole body of how LANGUAGEs work – we talk about the different LANGUAGEs and what they are used for as part of Intro to Computer science and have an immersive experience.To me, this is somewhat a comprimise between leaving it out entirely or forcing everyone to take 12 weeks of it. I just don’t know where 12 weeks would go in the curriculum.
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