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Marc Safran

Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants - 1 views

  • Our students have changed radically. Today’s students are no longer the people our educational system was designed to teach.
  • today's students think and process information fundamentally differently from their predecessors
  • we can say with certainty that their thinking patterns have changed
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  • The importance of the distinction is this: As Digital Immigrants learn - like all immigrants, some better than others - to adapt to their environment, they always retain, to some degree, their "accent," that is, their foot in the past.
  • There are hundreds of examples of the digital immigrant accent. 
  • our Digital Immigrant instructors, who speak an outdated language (that of the pre-digital age), are struggling to teach a population that speaks an entirely new language
  • Digital Immigrant teachers assume that learners are the same as they have always been, and that the same methods that worked for the teachers when they were students will work for their students now. But that assumption is no longer valid. Today's learners are different.
  • So what should happen?  Should the Digital Native students learn the old ways, or should their Digital Immigrant educators learn the new? 
  • methodology
  • learn to communicate in the language and style of their students
  • it does mean going faster, less step-by step, more in parallel, with more random access, among other thing
  • kinds of content
  • As educators, we need to be thinking about how to teach both Legacy and Future content in the language of the Digital Natives.
  • Adapting materials to the language of Digital Natives has already been done successfully.  My own preference for teaching Digital Natives is to invent computer games to do the job, even for the most serious content.
  • "Why not make the learning into a video game!
  • But while the game was easy for my Digital Native staff to invent, creating the content turned out to be more difficult for the professors, who were used to teaching courses that started with "Lesson 1 – the Interface."  We asked them instead to create a series of graded tasks into which the skills to be learned were embedded. The professors had made 5-10 minute movies to illustrate key concepts; we asked them to cut them to under 30 seconds. The professors insisted that the learners to do all the tasks in order; we asked them to allow random access. They wanted a slow academic pace, we wanted speed and urgency (we hired a Hollywood script writer to provide this.)   They wanted written instructions; we wanted computer movies. They wanted the traditional pedagogical language of "learning objectives," "mastery", etc. (e.g. "in this exercise you will learn"); our goal was to completely eliminate any language that even smacked of education.
  • large mind-shift required
  • We need to invent Digital Native methodologies for all subjects, at all levels, using our students to guide us.
  •  
    Our students have changed radically. Today's students are no longer the people our educational system was designed to teach.
Justin Shorb

Ten Ideas for Getting Started with 21st Century Teaching and Learning by Lisa Nielsen - 1 views

  • could not survive or teach effectively without these three things.
    • Gary Cordray
       
      I find this to be a bit of an overstatement.
    • Russ Goerend
       
      I agree, Gary. If she couldn't teach effectively without them, she may want to refocus on her pedagogy.
  • more innovatively.
  • You need ideas about how to enhance the curriculum with technology.
    • Gary Cordray
       
      Yes I do. Especially in AP.
    • Stephanie Meurer
       
      I agree...While I don't want technology to overtake my classroom, I do want to engage students as much as possible, and I'll use technolgy when it's easy to manage/use and effective.
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  • well thought out professional development plan
    • Gary Cordray
       
      I feel that our plan right now is to throw a bunch of software applications and hardware at us and let us figure it all out. Not working for me. I need to take one thing at a time and really learn it before I can use it in my classroom.
  • assess how you’re doing.
    • Gary Cordray
       
      And how the kids are doing.
    • Stephanie Meurer
       
      I agree...also is it a effective use of their time!
  • no longer acceptable
    • Gary Cordray
       
      Really? Why? When?
    • Russ Goerend
       
      Diigo is a social network, Gary. The types of discussions you have on here, the learning that you do, that's why we need to be involved in the personalized professional development social networking can give us.
  • laptop, projector, and internet access.
  • I recommend investing in low cost laptop carts so students also have devices
    • Stephanie Meurer
       
      Wouldn't this be nice!!
    • Gary Cordray
       
      Invest...there's a term we don't hear much recently.
    • Russ Goerend
       
      Low-cost laptop carts? What is the price range of low-cost? Is this directed at teachers or administrators?
  • you need a laptop, projector, and internet access.
    • Stephanie Meurer
       
      These are a must in my classroom...They are used daily. They certainly are more engaging than using the overhead.
  • Wikis are an amazing and transformative tool for educators
    • Stephanie Meurer
       
      How do you use this in the classroom? For students? I need more information on ths.
    • Gary Cordray
       
      Me too. Again, we need training for all this.
    • Justin Shorb
       
      If you click on the link just 2 lines below this highlight ('over here') there are clues on how to use wikis in teaching. In Chemical Education, we have been investigating using these both to teach and to build an online living text. See Laura Pence's talk at http://www.softconference.com/llc/player.asp?PVQ=GEDM&fVQ=EKKJFJ&hVQ= (may require ACS membership). Contact me if you are interested in how other chemists are using them.
Maggie Tsai

Diigo: Why I use it. « Rhondda's Reflections - wandering around the Web - 0 views

  • So why do I use Diigo?   I like its ability to enhance my bookmarking with highlights and sticky notes, that are retained with the page when I go back to it. I like that you can highlight and publish easily from Diigo to you blog or an email, and a reference appears automatically along with the posting. I like the ability to create lists on specific topics that can be shared. I like the ability to create groups to pool resources for specific subjects. I recently joined a few Diigo groups and have had some very useful sites brought to my attention. I like that you can access and search the bookmarks anywhere by full-text and tags. I like to search for the most popular bookmarks on a particular subject. I like the different ways to share and aggregate information that  Diigo offers. I have set it up so that a list of my new bookmarks appears on this blog on a weekly basis but this is just one option. You can now choose to automatically The tool bar is easy to download and makes it easy to use and aspect of Diigo whenever you are on line.
  • Of course you can keep things private if you choose to but that is really defeating the purpose of Diigo in the first place. Diigo also began offering, on Sept 19th, a Diigo Education Account Facility. I haven’t investigated this yet but a post about it was put onto the SLAV Bright Ideas blog. It is worth looking at. From Diigo ‘The Diigo Educator Accounts offer a suite of features that makes it incredibly easy for teachers to get their entire class of students or their peers started on collaborative research using Diigo’s powerful web annotation and social bookmarking technology.’ For an educator account, you do have to apply and fill out how/why you want to use Diigo in your school.
Tim Cooper

Gami-Bot « Howtoons - 44 views

  •  
    Amazing site with easy maker how to's.All simple projects with easy to obtain parts to bring the maker Revolution to your kids. Listed by discipline.
Emily Mann

The Wilderness Downtown - 47 views

  •  
     Chrome Experiments of fun with html5 are meant to show off the clean and fast beauty of the new code.  Of  course Google wants you to see it in Chrome for full effect, and I would encourage that as Chrome is an easy and responsive browser, you try it out.  The Wilderness Downtown is a great example of an interactive and connected multimedia experience that mashes together Google Maps and Earth with a driving tune to blast you to your past.  Go in and enter your old address and feel the nostalgia of swooping over your childhood home with a soundtrack and pacing just for you. Students are making digital stories.  They may not be writing html5 apps, but they are accessing, or can access, many sources of media to deepen their message.  A showing of a story like what you help create with The Wilderness Downtown experiment can inspire students to consider how they can use everyday tools like Google Earth to connect with an audience. Just go to http://www.thewildernessdowntown.com/ and type in your address. 
Elizabeth McCarthy

Diigo EDU School Account Admin Questions - 99 views

Yes, this would make sense to add to the Google Marketplace for third party apps for the education edition would be perfect.

Roland Gesthuizen

Get Schooled - 46 views

  •  
    "Ever wondered how your local schools were doing? Trying to sift through the data that is publicly available is an enormous task. The information is not easy to find and rarely has context to help you understand what the statistics mean for your student, your school, your district, the state you live in, and the rest of the country."
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    When we distill schools into "one easy click", students are reduced to a single number, ranked on a ladder of life.
Javier E

The Default Major - Skating Through B-School - NYTimes.com - 41 views

  • Dr. Mason, who teaches economics at the University of North Florida, believes his students are just as intelligent as they’ve always been. But many of them don’t read their textbooks, or do much of anything else that their parents would have called studying. “We used to complain that K-12 schools didn’t hold students to high standards,” he says with a sigh. “And here we are doing the same thing ourselves.”
  • all evidence suggests that student disengagement is at its worst in Dr. Mason’s domain: undergraduate business education.
  • “Business education has come to be defined in the minds of students as a place for developing elite social networks and getting access to corporate recruiters,”
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  • It’s an attitude that Dr. Khurana first saw in M.B.A. programs but has migrated, he says, to the undergraduate level.
  • Second, in management and marketing, no strong consensus has emerged about what students ought to learn or how they ought to learn it.
  • Gains on the C.L.A. closely parallel the amount of time students reported spending on homework. Another explanation is the heavy prevalence of group assignments in business courses: the more time students spent studying in groups, the weaker their gains in the kinds of skills the C.L.A. measures.
  • The pedagogical theory is that managers need to function in groups, so a management education without such experiences would be like medical training without a residency. While some group projects are genuinely challenging, the consensus among students and professors is that they are one of the elements of business that make it easy to skate through college.
  • “We’ve got students who don’t read, and grow up not reading,” he says. “There are too many other things competing for their time. The frequency and quantity of drinking keeps getting higher. We have issues with depression. Getting students alert and motivated — even getting them to class, to be honest with you — it’s a challenge.”
  • “A lot of classes I’ve been exposed to, you just go to class and they do the PowerPoint from the book,” he says. “It just seems kind of pointless to go when (a) you’re probably not going to be paying much attention anyway and (b) it would probably be worth more of your time just to sit with your book and read it.”
  • “It seems like now, every take-home test you get, you can just go and Google. If the question is from a test bank, you can just type the text in, and somebody out there will have it and you can just use that.”
  • This is not senioritis, he says: this is the way all four years have been. In a typical day, “I just play sports, maybe go to the gym. Eat. Probably drink a little bit. Just kind of goof around all day.” He says his grade-point average is 3.3.
  • concrete business skills tend to expire in five years or so as technology and organizations change.
  • History and philosophy, on the other hand, provide the kind of contextual knowledge and reasoning skills that are indispensable for business students.
  • when they hand in papers, they’re marked up twice: once for content by a professor with specialized expertise, and once for writing quality by a business-communication professor.
  • a national survey of 259 business professors who had been teaching for at least 10 years. On average, respondents said they had reduced the math and analytic-thinking requirements in their courses. In exchange, they had increased the number of requirements related to computer skills and group presentations.
  • what about employers? What do they want? According to national surveys, they want to hire 22-year-olds who can write coherently, think creatively and analyze quantitative data, and they’re perfectly happy to hire English or biology majors. Most Ivy League universities and elite liberal arts colleges, in fact, don’t even offer undergraduate business majors.
Erin DeBell

Indirect Object Pronouns: Part Three - 0 views

    • Erin DeBell
       
      SCROLL DOWN FOR AN IMPORTANT RULE FOR SENTENCES WITH MULTIPLE VERBS (BACK TO BACK VERBS)
  • When a sentence has two verbs, the first verb is conjugated and the second verb remains in the infinitive form.
  • Puedo pagar
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  • prefiere hablar
  • In sentences with two verbs, there are two options regarding the placement of the indirect object pronoun.
  • Here are examples of the indirect object pronoun placed before the conjugated verb:
  • Here are examples of the indirect object pronoun attached directly to the infinitive:
  • Here are the two methods side by side. Neither method is "better" than the other.
  • you must learn to recognize whole groups of words, rather than inspecting each word independently.
  • Your success in being able to recognize these groups is largely dependent upon having learned previous material -- namely verb conjugation.
  • You need to be able to quickly recognize a conjugated verb and an infinitive. You need to automatically recognize "necesito comprar" as "I need to buy."
  • If you can do that, it is just one small step to recognize "te necesito comprar" as "I need to buy for you." From there, the final step is easy: "Te necesito comprar un regalo."
    • Erin DeBell
       
      How quickly are you able to recognize and produce conjugations of key verbs?  Most students are not as confident with conjugation as they should be when they start studying object pronouns.  No wonder it does not come easy!  Want to fix this?   Visit this link to practice conjugating common irregular verbs in the present tense.  If you like it, keep practicing all the other tenses you need to know!
    • Erin DeBell
       
      http://conjuguemos.com/home/docs/nologin/spanish_verbs_verbs_6.html This link also includes regular verbs, FYI.  Follow the link and click START to begin!
Florence Dujardin

Promoting Student Engagement by Integrating New Technology into Tertiary Education: The Role of the iPad | Manuguerra | Asian Social Science - 3 views

  •  
    Teachers in tertiary education need new strategies to communicate with students of the net generation and to shape enticing educational experiences for them. The use of new approaches such as video-recorded lectures to communicate directly and individually with all students has been the preserve of technology-savvy educators. However, a recent technological advance - the Apple iPad - has the potential to change this situation, offering access to effective and efficient pedagogy in an easy and intuitive way. This paper is a report on the use of the iPad in teaching activities over the past 15 months, showing how it can be used to enhance engagement with learning for tertiary students, both those studying live on campus and those studying at a distance.
Deborah Baillesderr

TodaysMeet - 41 views

  •  
    I have a few students who have a very difficult time asking questions and contributing to class discussions, so I thought I would try out a backchannel tool to help them find their voice. I was amazed at how much more these students participated during the lesson. I used this site, it was very easy to use and you don't have to sign-up for an account. Also, the students do not have to sign-in to the site, they just put in the class name I set up.
Deborah Baillesderr

Nearpod - How it Works - 65 views

  •  
    Create interactive mobile presentations. Free with additional options to purchase lessons.
  •  
    "Create, Engage, and Assess With Nearpod it's easy, really easy." Wonderful app!
cwozniak Wozniak

Educational Leadership:How Teachers Learn:Learning with Blogs and Wikis - 2 views

  • What makes professional development even more frustrating to practitioners is that most of the programs we are exposed to are drawn directly from the latest craze sweeping the business world. In the past 10 years, countless schools have read Who Moved My Cheese?, studied The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People, learned to have "Crucial Conversations," and tried to move "from Good to Great."
  • With the investment of a bit of time and effort, I've found a group of writers to follow who expose me to more interesting ideas in one day than I've been exposed to in the past 10 years of costly professional development. Professional growth for me starts with 20 minutes of blog browsing each morning, sifting through the thoughts of practitioners whom I might never have been able to learn from otherwise and considering how their work translates into what I do with students.
  • This learning has been uniquely authentic, driven by personal interests and connected to classroom realities. Blogs have introduced a measure of differentiation and challenge to my professional learning plan that had long been missing. I wrestle over the characteristics of effective professional development with Patrick Higgins (http://chalkdust101.wordpress.com) and the elements of high-quality instruction for middle grades students with Dina Strasser (http://theline.edublogs.org). Scott McLeod (www.dangerouslyirrelevant.org) forces me to think about driving school change from the system level; and Nancy Flanagan (http://teacherleaders.typepad.com/teacher_in_a_strange_land) helps me understand the connections between education policy and classroom practice. John Holland (http://circle-time.blogspot.com) and Larry Ferlazzo, Brian Crosby, and Alice Mercer (http://inpractice.edublogs.org) open my eyes to the challenges of working in high-needs communities.
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  • That's when I introduce them to RSS (Really Simple Syndication) feed readers.
  • If you're not sure where to begin, explore the blogs that I've organized in my professional Pageflake at www.pageflakes.com/wferriter/16618841. I read these blogs all the time. Some leave me challenged. Some leave me angry. Some leave me jazzed. All leave me energized and ready to learn more. School leaders may be interested in the collection of blogs at www.pageflakes.com/wferriter/23697456.
  • A power shift is underway and a tough new business rule is emerging: Harness the new collaboration or perish. Those who fail to grasp this will find themselves ever more isolated—cut off from the networks that are sharing, adapting, and updating knowledge to create value. (Kindle location 268–271)
  • The few moments
  • Technology has made it easy for educators to embrace continual professional development.
  • knowledge is readily available for free
  •  
    Learning with blogs and wikis.
Chad Evans

Response: Advice From The "Book Whisperer," Ed Week Readers & Me About Teaching Reading - Classroom Q&A With Larry Ferlazzo - Education Week Teacher - 0 views

    • Chad Evans
       
      Highlighting text is really easy with Diigo. And adding a sticky note is very simple is well. It can be made private or shared with groups of people who are working with the same document
  • Other ways I encourage these kinds of discussions includes having students choose their own groupings and books for independent book "clubs" and using the Web as a vehicle to create audio and/or video "book trailers."
    • Chad Evans
       
      From a technology end, our kids are beginning to do more and more with tools like voicethread, animoto, imovie, etc. Digital storytelling is a great way for students to be creative, share insights and show what they know and can do. 
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  • One facet of our reading instruction that cannot be overlooked is the importance of teacher readers in building a classroom reading community. According to Morrison, Jacobs, and Swinyard (1999), "perhaps the most influential teacher behavior to influence students' literacy development is personal reading, both in and out of school."
    • Chad Evans
       
      I wonder how open ALL teachers are about what they are reading? How much conversation do teachers as a whole have about what they are reading? 
  • If we don't read, why should our students?
  • Share your reading life with your students. Show your students what reading adds to your life. If you are reading a nonfiction book at the moment, tell them what you are learning. Pass the children's books you are reading to them when you are done. Describe the funny, sad, or interesting moments in the books you read. When you read something challenging, talk with your students about how you work through difficult text. It will surprise them that you find reading hard at times, too, but choose to read, anyway.
  • Many students in today's world do not read books outside of school. When they do read, it is text-messages, web pages or homework assignments. For students who did not grow up in homes with books, with adults who read and who read to them, this time to read in school is both necessary and pleasurable. Many of my students need catch-up time when it comes to "hours-in" reading. The 10 minutes at the beginning of each period that I allow my juniors each day equals hours of reading across the months of the school year. My most dedicated readers begin books in the classroom, finish them at home, and return to the classroom/school library to check out new books.
    • Chad Evans
       
      This is an important distinction in that I believe (and research indicates) that our kids ARE reading more than ever before. But it comes in non-traditional forms. We must acknowledge that web based reading is still reading, but it differs. Research also indicates that when kids read digitally, they read in a different pattern. In traditional reading, they read in a z pattern down a page. Digital reading is more of an F pattern,indicating skim and scan. 
Wayne Holly

ReminderGuru - 4 views

  •  
    Reminder Guru is a free service that you can use to have reminders sent to you through email, text message, or phone call. Creating reminders in Reminder Guru is very quick and easy. After you have registered on the service, simply fill in the reminder form with a message for yourself, choose a reminder date, then specify how you want the reminder delivered to you. If there are tasks that you need to be reminded of daily, weekly, or monthly, you can set reminders to automatically repeat at the same time every day or week. (Free Technology for Teachers)
Martin Burrett

Prisma - 6 views

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    Apps which change photos into art-like creation which use filters are easy to find. This astounding app uses artificial intelligent which makes choices adapt how to adapt the image to produce amazing results. There are currently over 30 styles to choose from… the AI allows you to do that bit!
Damianne President

ForgeFX - 3D Topographic Map Simulation Software - 3 views

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    This real-time 3D simulation illustrates how topographic maps are created and used to depict changes in elevation. A topographic map is characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief using contour lines. Rendered in real-time 3D, it is easy to understand how topographic maps are created since the simulation shows the same virtual environment in both a 3D mesh and 2D map format.
Michele Brown

The National Networker (TNNW) Blog: BEYOND THE CUBICLE - CORPORATE CULTURE: Tweeple, Twibes and Tweets…the culture of virtual communities - 9 views

  • The culture appears to be grounded in not only a need to share, but also a desire to be recognized. Retweets – when someone sends your tweet (message) out to their followers (a term supporting the need for recognition) somehow elevates your status within this community.
  • Social Media as a dominant force for communicating has penetrated every element of society. Can a virtual community possess a culture? Every company and organization possesses a definable culture. Behaviors, decision-making models, intrinsic and extrinsic actions and how people are treated may all play a part in defining it. These elements of culture are measureable and easy to define within a controlled entity. Social media lives and breathes in a virtual reality. It permeates all corners of the world, allows people to communicate across all traditional boundaries and thrives 24 hours/day. So…does it have a definable culture? If you have spent any time on Twitter, you quickly realize thousands of people have a need to respond to the question, “What’s happening?” Twitter has developed it’s own language with tweets, retweets, tweeple, twitpics, twibes, etc. You can follow topics with a hashtag and people with lists. What is most apparent is the need people have to share. The culture appears to be grounded in not only a need to share, but also a desire to be recognized. Retweets – when someone sends your tweet (message) out to their followers (a term supporting the need for recognition) somehow elevates your status within this community. There are etiquette protocols as many people publicly thank you for following them and for retweeting. Retweeting becomes a type
  • As you get deeper into the structure of Twitter, you can join a twibe or tweeple group, which provides inclusion – another indication that the need for recognition is systemic.
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  • Social media lives and breathes in a virtual reality. It permeates all corners of the world, allows people to communicate across all traditional boundaries and thrives 24 hours/day. So…does it have a definable culture?
  • The culture appears to be grounded in not only a need to share, but also a desire to be recognized. Retweets – when someone sends your tweet (message) out to their followers (a term supporting the need for recognition) somehow elevates your status within this community.
Tricia Hunt

How to Teach with Technology: Language Arts | Edutopia - 70 views

    • Tricia Hunt
       
      Never thought about letting kids "free blog" when they have a question!  Love that idea!
  • respond to a prompt on the blog for homework
    • Tricia Hunt
       
      I LOVE Photostory!  In the advent of Animoto and Voicethread I have COMPLETELY forgotten about how easy it is to use!
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  • VoiceThread is collaborative slide show software that allows users to contribute audio, images, and video.
    • Tricia Hunt
       
      Just used voice thread in my last online course and could totally see how commenting back and forth on the different images is AWESOME!
  • Doozla (13),
  • Comic Life
  •  
    Interesting perspectives and ideas about how to incorporate technology in the language arts classroom, but could easily extend beyond that
Roland Gesthuizen

Classroom Management - cheating | CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT FOR TEACHING TEENAGERS - 64 views

  •  
    "if you do not aggressively deal with cheating your students will lose respect for you and what you are teaching.  Cheating will happen, and you must be prepared to deal with it. Worse yet, though, is that when a teacher sees a student cheat, it often forever taints his impression of the child. Before talking about how to deal with cheating, it might be useful to put it in a reasonable context."
  •  
    Swift and draconian teaches one thing: don't get caught. They know they're not supposed to cheat and, largely, why. Although I will agree with the point regarding a lack of intrinsic value in rules for teenagers. However, there is no reason we can't try to begin developing a sense of genuine effort for ones own gain. Authentic assessment is a much more productive approach to reducing cheating behaviors. Good scaffolding and levels of feedback on research projects discourage academic dishonesty simply due to the attention the work receives. Kids cheat because they think they can get away with it. Why? Because objective assessments make it easy? Because teachers don't pay enough attention to the work? If we, as professionals, model a means of making work easier for us, how can we blame the kids for following our lead?
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