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Steven Engravalle

13 Must-Have Gadgets and Apps for Educators -- THE Journal - 9 views

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    T.H.E. Journal asked Leslie Fisher and Hall Davidson, presenters at FETC's popular Tech Shootout session, to share some of the tools they're still excited about. From apps to gadgets, here are their must-haves for educators.
Roland Gesthuizen

2010 October - feature: do schools need ICT? - 26 views

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    Ian Yorston explains why investment in ICT doesn't necessarily pay "If you had to spend a million pounds, you'd really hope to have something to show for it. Yet most schools have spent at least that on ICT and get nothing obvious in return - aside from a few hundred PCs running Windows XP and a handful of smart gadgets."
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    Ian Yorston explains why the current investment in ICT doesn't pay "If you had to spend a million pounds, you'd really hope to have something to show for it. Yet most schools have spent at least that on ICT and get nothing obvious in return - aside from a few hundred PCs running Windows XP and a handful of smart gadgets."
Lee-Anne Patterson

me and my iPhone (and the larger potential for learners) - NeverEndingSearch - Blog on School Library Journal - 0 views

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    blog post from Joyce Valenza about her iPhone - it transends the gadget style post because she links in stuff for education. Where will mobile tech stop?
Roland Gesthuizen

5 Apps to Lower Teacher Anxiety & Raise Student Voices - Getting Smart by John Hardison - DigLN, edchat, EdTech - 133 views

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    "All educators have access to a superhero's toolbelt of time-saving gadgets that lower teacher anxiety while elevating students' voices. I like to think of them as technology sedatives."
Suz Arnott

FREE PowerPoint Twitter Tools | SAP Web 2.0 - 191 views

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    what a wonderful tool... making interactivity in presentations much easier... no gadgets, just a phone for students to tweet with... very cool
Jennie Snyder

Change Depends on More than Shiny iGadgets [SLIDE] - The Tempered Radical - 54 views

  • But let's not mistake purchases for progress when reflecting on our efforts to change teaching and learning spaces.
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    Once again Bill Ferriter provides a thoughtful reminder that changing teaching and learning spaces depends on vision, not gadgets
Holly Gerla

Is Real Educational Reform Possible? If So, How? | Psychology Today - 3 views

  • Children come into the world intensely motivated to learn about the physical, social, and cultural world around them; but they need freedom in order to pursue that motive.  For their first four or five years of life we generally grant them that freedom. During those first few years, without any teaching, they learn a large portion of what any human being ever learns. They learn their entire native language, from scratch. They learn the basic practical principles of physics. They learn psychology to such a degree that they become experts in how to please, annoy, manipulate, and charm the other people in their environment.  They acquire a huge store of factual knowledge.  They learn how to operate the gadgets that they are allowed to operate, even those that seem extraordinarily complex to us adults.They do all this on their own initiative, with essentially no direction from adults.
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    "Children come into the world intensely motivated to learn about the physical, social, and cultural world around them; but they need freedom in order to pursue that motive."
Stan Golanka

Reading and the Web - Texts Without Context - NYTimes.com - 49 views

  • It’s also a question, as Mr. Lanier, 49, astutely points out in his new book, “You Are Not a Gadget,” of how online collectivism, social networking and popular software designs are changing the way people think and process information, a question of what becomes of originality and imagination in a world that prizes “metaness” and regards the mash-up as “more important than the sources who were mashed.”
    • Stan Golanka
       
      Core discussion topic? From this, I see a few discussion issues: 1. Do we prize "mash-ups" more than original work? Who is "we" in this? 2. If the answer to #1 is "yes," then the next question is: is this good or bad? 3. Finally, if the answer is "bad" to #2, what place do "mash-ups" have, and how do we help our students see the value in original work?
  • Web 2.0 is creating a “digital forest of mediocrity” and substituting ill-informed speculation for genuine expertise;
    • Stan Golanka
       
      How do teachers help students rise above this "digital forest of mediocrity"?
  • Mr. Johnson added that the book’s migration to the digital realm will turn the solitary act of reading — “a direct exchange between author and reader” — into something far more social and suggested that as online chatter about books grows, “the unity of the book will disperse into a multitude of pages and paragraphs vying for Google’s attention.”
    • Stan Golanka
       
      If Johnson's predictions are true, is this necessarily bad? How much of this concern is "nostalgia"? What would be lost from an academic p.o.v, and what migh be gained?
  • ...5 more annotations...
  • Instead of reading an entire news article, watching an entire television show or listening to an entire speech, growing numbers of people are happy to jump to the summary, the video clip, the sound bite — never mind if context and nuance are lost in the process; never mind if it’s our emotions, more than our sense of reason, that are engaged; never mind if statements haven’t been properly vetted and sourced.
    • Stan Golanka
       
      Should teachers "fight" this, or embrace it? Can summaries/sound bites ever be appropriate for academic discussions?
  • And online research enables scholars to power-search for nuggets of information that might support their theses, saving them the time of wading through stacks of material that might prove marginal but that might have also prompted them to reconsider or refine their original thinking.
  • Digital insiders like Mr. Lanier and Paulina Borsook, the author of the book “Cyberselfish,” have noted the easily distracted, adolescent quality of much of cyberculture. Ms. Borsook describes tech-heads as having “an angry adolescent view of all authority as the Pig Parent,” writing that even older digerati want to think of themselves as “having an Inner Bike Messenger.”
    • Stan Golanka
       
      Can teachers moderate this attitude? Does our (adults) use/non-use of technology help breed this attitude?
  • authors “will increasingly tailor their work to a milieu that the writer Caleb Crain describes as ‘groupiness,’ where people read mainly ‘for the sake of a feeling of belonging’ rather than for personal enlightenment or amusement. As social concerns override literary ones, writers seem fated to eschew virtuosity and experimentation in favor of a bland but immediately accessible style.
    • Stan Golanka
       
      Does this ring true to educators? Are social concerns and literary conerns opposites? How does web publishing affect "literary" publishing, as opposed to "non-literary" publishing?
  • However impossible it is to think of “Jon & Kate Plus Eight” or “Jersey Shore” as art, reality shows have taken over wide swaths of television,
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