Skip to main content

Home/ Diigo In Education/ Group items matching "common Standards" in title, tags, annotations or url

Group items matching
in title, tags, annotations or url

Sort By: Relevance | Date Filter: All | Bookmarks | Topics Simple Middle
Jeannie Anderson

Common Core State Common Initiative | Home - 55 views

shared by Jeannie Anderson on 15 Mar 10 - Cached
  • The Common Core State Common provide a consistent, clear understanding
  • The Common Core State Common provide a consistent, clear understanding of what students are expected to learn, so teachers and parents know what they need to do to help them. The Common are designed to be robust and relevant to the real world, reflecting the knowledge and skills that our young people need for success in college and careers.
    • Jeannie Anderson
       
      How does CCSS provide a consistent, clear understanding of what students are expected to learn? Who is in charge of this curriculum?
  • ...1 more annotation...
  • global economy
  •  
    Draft of K-12 curriculum standards as part of the standards Core State standards Initiative (CCSSI) available for comment
  • ...2 more comments...
  •  
    Please excuse any cross-posting.
  •  
    Common Core Common Website
  •  
    This is the homepage for the Common Core Common. All Common k-12 are presented and organized by grade-level and content area. You may want to review the Common and highlight the Common you will need to address. You can then print out those Common you need to address.
  •  
    The Common Core State Common provide a consistent, clear understanding of what students are expected to learn, so teachers and parents know what they need to do to help them.
Cara Whitehead

Educational Standards Correlations - 46 views

  •  
    VocabularySpellingCity provides the following sets of correlations to standards: U.S. standards by State standards Core standards for each States' Implementation Australian standards by State Canadian standards by Province English National Curriculum standards
anonymous

Common Core Common - 6 views

  •  
    View the Common Core State Common in one convenient FREE app! A great reference for students, parents, and teachers to easily read and understand the core Common. Quickly find Common by subject, grade, and subject category (domain/cluster). This app includes Math Common K-12 and Language Arts Common K-12.
melissa renko

Common Core State Common Initiative | English Language Arts Common | Science & Technical Subjects | Grades 9-10 - 74 views

  • trace the text’s explanation or depiction of a complex process, phenomenon, or concept
    • melissa renko
       
      added to the standard from grades 6-8
  • attending to special cases or exceptions defined in the text.
  •  
    common core common described for science embedded in the ELA common
danthomander

Meet the New Common Core - The New York Times - 19 views

  • Standardized tests certainly aren’t going anywhere. States that have dumped exams aligned with the Common Core aren’t dumping high-stakes testing; they’re just switching to new tests, like the ACT’s Aspire. (Other ACT offerings include the Explore, the Engage and the Compass. Apparently standardized tests are titled by the same people who name midsize sedans.)
  • The Common Core is the way math was taught before. True, the new South Carolina Common are 92 percent aligned with the Common Core. But the Common Core was 97 percent aligned with the math Common South Carolina was using before! The term “number sentence,” which the comedian Stephen Colbert mocked, is 50 years old, and the kind of problem it describes appears in textbooks from the 1920s.
  •  
    "Standardized tests certainly aren't going anywhere. States that have dumped exams aligned with the Common Core aren't dumping high-stakes testing; they're just switching to new tests, like the ACT's Aspire. (Other ACT offerings include the Explore, the Engage and the Compass. Apparently standardized tests are titled by the same people who name midsize sedans.)"
onepulledthread

Why I Cannot Support the Common Core Common | Diane Ravitch's blog - 5 views

  •  
    Useful critique that argues that the national common core common should be voluntary, not mandatory, since they have been developed within a corporate context that required such common as a condition of eligibility for "race to the top" funds, and that it is unclear whether these common will have positive or negative effects on students--they just haven't been tried enough to justify them as "national" or "mandatory."
Andrew McCluskey

Occupy Your Brain - 111 views

  • One of the most profound changes that occurs when modern schooling is introduced into traditional societies around the world is a radical shift in the locus of power and control over learning from children, families, and communities to ever more centralized systems of authority.
  • Once learning is institutionalized under a central authority, both freedom for the individual and respect for the local are radically curtailed.  The child in a classroom generally finds herself in a situation where she may not move, speak, laugh, sing, eat, drink, read, think her own thoughts, or even  use the toilet without explicit permission from an authority figure.
  • In what should be considered a chilling development, there are murmurings of the idea of creating global standards for education – in other words, the creation of a single centralized authority dictating what every child on the planet must learn.
  • ...26 more annotations...
  • In “developed” societies, we are so accustomed to centralized control over learning that it has become functionally invisible to us, and most people accept it as natural, inevitable, and consistent with the principles of freedom and democracy.   We assume that this central authority, because it is associated with something that seems like an unequivocal good – “education” – must itself be fundamentally good, a sort of benevolent dictatorship of the intellect. 
  • We endorse strict legal codes which render this process compulsory, and in a truly Orwellian twist, many of us now view it as a fundamental human right to be legally compelled to learn what a higher authority tells us to learn.
  • And yet the idea of centrally-controlled education is as problematic as the idea of centrally-controlled media – and for exactly the same reasons.
  • The First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution was designed to protect all forms of communication, information-sharing, knowledge, opinion and belief – what the Supreme Court has termed “the sphere of intellect and spirit” – from government control.
  • by the mid-19th century, with Indians still to conquer and waves of immigrants to assimilate, the temptation to find a way to manage the minds of an increasingly diverse and independent-minded population became too great to resist, and the idea of the Common School was born.
  • We would keep our freedom of speech and press, but first we would all be well-schooled by those in power.
  • A deeply democratic idea — the free and equal education of every child — was wedded to a deeply anti-democratic idea — that this education would be controlled from the top down by state-appointed educrats.
  • The fundamental point of the Occupy Wall Street movement is that the apparatus of democratic government has been completely bought and paid for by a tiny number of grotesquely wealthy individuals, corporations, and lobbying groups.  Our votes no longer matter.  Our wishes no longer count.  Our power as citizens has been sold to the highest bidder.
  • Our kids are so drowned in disconnected information that it becomes quite random what they do and don’t remember, and they’re so overburdened with endless homework and tests that they have little time or energy to pay attention to what’s happening in the world around them.
  • If in ten years we can create Wikipedia out of thin air, what could we create if we trusted our children, our teachers, our parents, our neighbors, to generate community learning webs that are open, alive, and responsive to individual needs and aspirations?  What could we create if instead of trying to “scale up” every innovation into a monolithic bureaucracy we “scaled down” to allow local and individual control, freedom, experimentation, and diversity?
  • The most academically “gifted” students excel at obedience, instinctively shaping their thinking to the prescribed curriculum and unconsciously framing out of their awareness ideas that won’t earn the praise of their superiors.  Those who resist sitting still for this process are marginalized, labeled as less intelligent or even as mildly brain-damaged, and, increasingly, drugged into compliance.
  • the very root, the very essence, of any theory of democratic liberty is a basic trust in the fundamental intelligence of the ordinary person.   Democracy rests on the premise that the ordinary person — the waitress, the carpenter, the shopkeeper — is competent to make her own judgments about matters of domestic policy, international affairs, taxes, justice, peace, and war, and that the government must abide by the decisions of ordinary people, not vice versa.  Of course that’s not the way our system really works, and never has been.   But most of us recall at some deep level of our beings that any vision of a just world relies on this fundamental respect for the common sense of the ordinary human being.
  • This is what we spend our childhood in school unlearning. 
  • If before we reach the age of majority we must submit our brains for twelve years of evaluation and control by government experts, are we then truly free to exercise our vote according to the dictates of our own common sense and conscience?  Do we even know what our own common sense is anymore?
  • We live in a country where a serious candidate for the Presidency is unaware that China has nuclear weapons, where half the population does not understand that Saddam Hussein had nothing to do with 9/11, where nobody pays attention as Congress dismantles the securities regulations that limit the power of the banks, where 45% of American high school students graduate without knowing that the First Amendment of the Constitution guarantees freedom of the press.   At what point do we begin to ask ourselves if we are trying to control quality in the wrong way?
  • Human beings, collaborating with one another in voluntary relationships, communicating and checking and counter-checking and elaborating and expanding on one another’s knowledge and intelligence, have created a collective public resource more vast and more alive than anything that has ever existed on the planet.
  • But this is not a paeon to technology; this is about what human intelligence is capable of when people are free to interact in open, horizontal, non-hierarchical networks of communication and collaboration.
  • Positive social change has occurred not through top-down, hierarchically controlled organizations, but through what the Berkana Institute calls “emergence,” where people begin networking and forming voluntary communities of practice. When the goal is to maximize the functioning of human intelligence, you need to activate the unique skills, talents, and knowledge bases of diverse individuals, not put everybody through a uniform mill to produce uniform results. 
  • You need a non-punitive structure that encourages collaboration rather than competition, risk-taking rather than mistake-avoidance, and innovation rather than repetition of known quantities.
  • if we really want to return power to the 99% in a lasting, stable, sustainable way, we need to begin the work of creating open, egalitarian, horizontal networks of learning in our communities.
  • They are taught to focus on competing with each other and gaming the system rather than on gaining a deep understanding of the way power flows through their world.
  • And what could we create, what ecological problems could we solve, what despair might we alleviate, if instead of imposing our rigid curriculum and the destructive economy it serves on the entire world, we embraced as part of our vast collective intelligence the wisdom and knowledge of the world’s thousands of sustainable indigenous cultures?
  • They knew this about their situation: nobody was on their side.  Certainly not the moneyed classes and the economic system, and not the government, either.  So if they were going to change anything, it had to come out of themselves.
  • As our climate heats up, as mountaintops are removed from Orissa to West Virginia, as the oceans fill with plastic and soils become too contaminated to grow food, as the economy crumbles and children go hungry and the 0.001% grows so concentrated, so powerful, so wealthy that democracy becomes impossible, it’s time to ask ourselves; who’s educating us?  To what end?  The Adivasis are occupying their forests and mountains as our children are occupying our cities and parks.  But they understand that the first thing they must take back is their common sense. 
  • They must occupy their brains.
  • Isn’t it time for us to do the same?
  •  
    Carol Black, creator of the documentary, "Schooling the World" discusses the conflicting ideas of centralized control of education and standardization against the so-called freedom to think independently--"what the Supreme Court has termed 'the sphere of intellect and spirit" (Black, 2012). Root questions: "who's educating us? to what end?" (Black, 2012).
  •  
    This is a must read. Carol Black echoes here many of the ideas of Paulo Freire, John Taylor Gatto and the like.
melissa renko

Common Core State Common Initiative | English Language Arts Common | Science & Technical Subjects | Grades 6-8 - 0 views

  • Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of science and technical texts.
    • melissa renko
       
      all of these standards are the same but they are built upon in grades 9-10
  •  
    common core science embedded in ELA common grades 6-8
Deb White Groebner

Education Week: Will We Ever Learn? - 37 views

  • All students should master a verifiable set of skills, but not necessarily the same skills. Part of the reason high schools fail so many kids is that educators can’t get free of the notion that all students—regardless of their career aspirations—need the same basic preparation. States are piling on academic courses, removing the arts, and downplaying career and technical education to make way for a double portion of math. Meanwhile, career-focused programs, such as Wisconsin’s youth apprenticeships and well-designed career academies, are engaging students and raising their post-high-school earnings, especially among hard-to-reach, at-risk male students.
  • Maintaining our one-size-fits-all approach will hurt many of the kids we are trying most to help. Maybe that approach, exemplified in the push for common common, will simply lead to yet more unmet education goals. But it won’t reduce, and might increase, the already high rate at which students drop out of school, or graduate without the skills and social behaviors required for career success.
  •  
    Well-written commentary for anyone interested in the impact of Common Core Common. "What's Wrong With the Common-Common Project" "We need rigorous but basic academics, homing in on skills that will be used, and not short-shrifting the "soft skill" behaviors that lead to success in college and careers. The management guru Peter Drucker got it right: "The result of a school is a student who has learned something and puts it to work 10 years later."
westphal

Exactly What The Common Core Common Say About Technology - 129 views

  • use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate with others; demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to type a minimum of one page in a single sitting.
  • Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using different mediums
  •  Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) in order to make informed decisions and solve problems, evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source and noting any discrepancies among the data.
  • ...7 more annotations...
  • Make strategic use of digital media
  • Publishing
  • Collaboration
  • Evaluation
  • Integration is a matter of design, and produces considerable cognitive load on a learner.
  • Social media professional learning networks (PLN) from linkedin to twitter, facebook to even pinterest, can be dominated by education technology discussion rather than broader concerns of how people learn , likely because those educators tending towards technology are on these digital networks to begin with.
  • rather requires learners to make complex decisions about how, when, and why to use technology–something educators must do as well.
  •  
    "@POUSDSupt: Exactly What The Common Core Common Say About Technology http://t.co/WTRFq2LUTt via @zite #ccss #edtech" Nicely presented.
  •  
    Tech standards in the standards core
Sarah Schaller Welsh

Freakonomics » What Should Be Done About Standardized Tests? A Freakonomics Quorum - 42 views

  • Gaston Caperton
  • Standardized tests have much in common with French fries. Both of them differ in composition as well as quality. French fries are available in numerous incarnations, including straight, curly, skins-on, skins-off, and, in recent years, with sweet potatoes. Regarding quality, of course, the taste of French fries can range substantially – from sublime to soggy. It’s really the same with standardized tests.
  • Take the No Child Left Behind Act, for instance, a federal accountability law requiring scads of standardized tests to be used in evaluating schools. Do you know that almost all of the standardized tests now being employed to judge school quality are unable to distinguish between well taught and badly taught students?
  • ...8 more annotations...
  • all schools – kindergarten through college – should employ exit exams allowing us to determine what students have actually learned. We owe it to our students to make sure that they’ve been properly taught.
  • Then there are the questions of what to do with the results. I have actually sat through an extended discussion of how we could use regression analysis to parse out the contribution different teachers made to a group of students’ performance on a set of standardized tests. The answer was, yes it was possible, and could in fact be used to award merit pay increases. But nobody left the room feeling very comfortable that there would be any gain in what we knew made for good teaching.
  • Roughly half of the nation’s students are taking tests under NCLB that are completely free of open-ended questions.
  • educators have a strong incentive to “teach to the test.” In this case, that means teaching low level skills at the expense of the more demanding material that everyone says students need to master in today’s complicated world.
  • But is it fair to give students what amounts to a counterfeit passport to college or work? And do such tests spur high school teachers and principals to aim high with their students? To both questions, the answer is, “No.” In most states today, high school exit tests serve the same role as the standardized tests mandated by NCLB: they try to jack up the floor of student achievement in the nation’s schools. The best high school exit tests would be end-of-course exams akin to the “comprehensive” exams that many colleges and universities require students to pass in their majors before graduation – tests, that is, that would raise the ceiling of student achievement.
  • High-stakes testing has narrowed and dumbed down curricula; eliminated time spent on untested subjects like social studies, art, and even recess; turned classrooms into little more than test preparation centers; reduced high school graduation rates; and driven good teachers from the profession. Those are all reasons why FairTest and other experts advocate a sharp reduction in public school standardized testing and a halt to exit exams.
  • igh school grade
  • point average is a better predictor of college success than either the SAT or the ACT.
Kate Tabor

Alfie Kohn Rejects National Standards : Constructing Modern Knowledge - 36 views

  •  
    Brian Silverman says, "It should be required reading for anyone concerned with democracy and long-term viability of public education. I've often said that national standards, even those thinly disguised under mischievous pseudonyms like "standards core standards" are not only a destructive force, but a solution in search of a problem. Alfie Kohn makes the case quite effectively. Mr. Kohn once again demonstrates his courage, tenacity and chutzpah by publishing his new article in Education Week's special "Quality Counts" issue. "Quality Counts" is the annual issue sponsored by standardized testing companies who rank each state's educational quality as a function of their reliance on high-stakes testing, teacher-bashing, punitive and anti-democratic education policies. The more draconian the state, the higher their "quality," according to Education Week."
Lisa C. Hurst

Inside the School Silicon Valley Thinks Will Save Education | WIRED - 9 views

  •  
    "AUTHOR: ISSIE LAPOWSKY. ISSIE LAPOWSKY DATE OF PUBLICATION: 05.04.15. 05.04.15 TIME OF PUBLICATION: 7:00 AM. 7:00 AM INSIDE THE SCHOOL SILICON VALLEY THINKS WILL SAVE EDUCATION Click to Open Overlay Gallery Students in the youngest class at the Fort Mason AltSchool help their teacher, Jennifer Aguilar, compile a list of what they know and what they want to know about butterflies. CHRISTIE HEMM KLOK/WIRED SO YOU'RE A parent, thinking about sending your 7-year-old to this rogue startup of a school you heard about from your friend's neighbor's sister. It's prospective parent information day, and you make the trek to San Francisco's South of Market neighborhood. You walk up to the second floor of the school, file into a glass-walled conference room overlooking a classroom, and take a seat alongside dozens of other parents who, like you, feel that public schools-with their endless bubble-filled tests, 38-kid classrooms, and antiquated approach to learning-just aren't cutting it. At the same time, you're thinking: this school is kind of weird. On one side of the glass is a cheery little scene, with two teachers leading two different middle school lessons on opposite ends of the room. But on the other side is something altogether unusual: an airy and open office with vaulted ceilings, sunlight streaming onto low-slung couches, and rows of hoodie-wearing employees typing away on their computers while munching on free snacks from the kitchen. And while you can't quite be sure, you think that might be a robot on wheels roaming about. Then there's the guy who's standing at the front of the conference room, the school's founder. Dressed in the San Francisco standard issue t-shirt and jeans, he's unlike any school administrator you've ever met. But the more he talks about how this school uses technology to enhance and individualize education, the more you start to like what he has to say. And so, if you are truly fed up with the school stat
Tim Smith

Common Core State Common Initiative | The Common - 46 views

  • The Common Core State Common focus on core conceptual understandings and procedures starting in the early grades, thus enabling teachers to take the time needed to teach core concepts and procedures well—and to give students the opportunity to master them.
    • Wendi Cyford
       
      Core Standards information
    • Tim Smith
       
      I have a mutliage looping classroom that includes both 5th & 6th graders togther. My question is, based on the obvious split in the CC between grade 3-5, and 6-8, is this a viable classroom setting anymore.
  • With students, parents and teachers all on the same page and working together for shared goals, we can ensure that students make progress each year and graduate from school prepared to succeed in college and in a modern workforce.
Jim Peterson

9 Questions and Answers About science teaching - 40 views

  •  
    9. In a post, you argue that the inquiry science teaching cannot flourish with common common. What is an alternative solution?  That's right.  We do not need a set of common Core common.  I am sure that the teachers in your high school are more capable of determining the curriculum for your classmates than any national committee assembled by the most prestigious organizations in the country.  Education needs to decentralized, not centralized.  There are more than 15,000 school districts in the United States.  Do you think that one set of common would meet the needs of these 15, 000 school districts.
aaxtell

CCSS "I Can" statements for K-8 - 64 views

  •  
    Kids learn best when they know what they're supposed to be learning. Make learning outcomes explicit with kid-friendly "I Can" statements tied to each Common Core standard.
  •  
    Kids learn best when they know what they're supposed to be learning. Make learning outcomes explicit with kid-friendly "I Can" statements tied to each Common Core standard.
Steven Szalaj

The Common Core - Who's Minding the Schools? - NYTimes.com - 57 views

  •  
    An essay on the effects of implementing Common Core Common and testing related to those Common.
MaryLiz Jones

Rae Ann Knopf: So Just What Are the Common Core Common? - 51 views

  •  
    So Just What are the Common Core Common?
Matt Renwick

Common Sense for the Common Core - edu Pulse - 27 views

  • literacy achievement gains tend to be fleeting
  • Without administrators who have a solid knowledge of effective literacy instruction
  • two huge obstacles may eventually cause the downfall
  • ...15 more annotations...
  • became necessary when it was blatantly apparent that not all students in U.S schools had equal opportunity to learn
  • standards are necessary but insufficient
  • isolated skills and/or standards
  • depends on teachers and leaders knowing how to expertly implement them
  • proliferating “Common Core-aligned” materials
  • We are a “quick fix” society, and we often reject a commitment to long-term goals and outcomes. 
  • What’s on the test is what gets taught
  • high-stakes testing that accompanies the standards
  • Administrators need to take the lead
  • Become discerning readers and writers.
  • Do more read-alouds of excellent literature.
  • Standards do not transform teaching and learning
  • Organize curriculum through emphasizing big ideas and important concepts.
  • Embed shared experiences in your teaching.
  • a culture of trust, inquiry, coaching, collaboration, celebration of strengths, and, yes, even joy
Maureen Greenbaum

The crucial need to hold students to a higher standard - The Week - 6 views

  • Even some high school valedictorians are taking remedial courses in college. Too many students are completely unprepared for the future.
  • Last year, the unemployment rate for Americans without a high school diploma was 14.1 percent. For those with a Bachelor's degree, it was 4.9 percent.
  • Common Core State Common, orient instruction around critical thinking and problem solving, requiring students to demonstrate a deep understanding of concepts and then apply them to new situations.
  • ...5 more annotations...
  • they are internationally-benchmarked and based on evidence and research about what it takes to be prepared for first-year college courses and entry level jobs leading to careers.
  • A student, for example, would no longer be required to simply memorize the formula for volume. Instead, they would need to use their conceptual understanding of volume to build different containers with the same volume. This approach differs from current standards and teaching practices, which too often place an emphasis on rote memorization over deeper understanding. 
  • Second, the standards are clear, focused, and rigorous
  • standards allow for economies of scale and the ability to share and compare across state lines.
  • Teachers in states that have adopted the Common Core can share effective practices and materials and collaborate more easily
1 - 20 of 144 Next › Last »
Showing 20 items per page