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Misha Miller

Using Groups Effectively: 10 Principles » Edurati Review - 50 views

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    "Conversation is key . Sawyer succinctly explains this principle: "Conversation leads to flow, and flow leads to creativity." When having students work in groups, consider what will spark rich conversation. The original researcher on flow, Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, found that rich conversation precedes and ignites flow more than any other activity.1 Tasks that require (or force) interaction lead to richer collaborative conceptualization. Set a clear but open-ended goal . Groups produce the richest ideas when they have a goal that will focus their interaction but also has fluid enough boundaries to allow for creativity. This is a challenge we often overlook. As teachers, we often have an idea of what a group's final product should look like (or sound like, or…). If we put students into groups to produce a predetermined outcome, we prevent creative thinking from finding an entry point. Try not announcing time limits. As teachers we often use a time limit as a "motivator" that we hope will keep group work focused. In reality, this may be a major detractor from quality group work. Deadlines, according to Sawyer, tend to impede flow and produce lower quality results. Groups produce their best work in low-pressure situations. Without a need to "keep one eye on the clock," the group's focus can be fully given to the task. Do not appoint a group "leader." In research studies, supervisors, or group leaders, tend to subvert flow unless they participate as an equal, listening and allowing the group's thoughts and decisions to guide the interaction. Keep it small. Groups with the minimum number of members that are needed to accomplish a task are more efficient and effective. Consider weaving together individual and group work. For additive tasks-tasks in whicha group is expectedtoproduce a list, adding one idea to another-research suggests that better results develop
Sharin Tebo

Making the Most Out of Teacher Collaboration | Edutopia - 42 views

  • Collaboration
  • collaborate
  • effective teacher collaboration
  • ...8 more annotations...
  • the attitude of professional privacy is not conducive to professional development
  • Build relationships Observe the best Ask questions Share Come prepared
  • preparation sparks much deeper conversation, more complete answers and better solutions. For informal collaborations, before I attempted to try out any new idea, I would ask one of my esteemed colleagues what they thought of it. In terms of assessments, the easiest way to improve the validity of the assessment is to have a colleague or group of colleagues review it.
  • develop a list of "how to" and "why for" questions regarding student data, instruction, discipline, etc.
  • bring my list of questions pertinent to the agenda in order to pick the groups' collective brain for answers.
  • one of the reasons that schools do not improve as fast as we would like them to is that when teachers get together for a purpose, rarely has research been done by the teachers, neither have ideas been mapped out prior to the meeting.
  • teachers, when it comes to their performance in the classroom, tend to stick to themselves.
  • Personal Steps to Effective Collaboration
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    Collaboration: Build relationships, observe the best, ask questions, share, come prepared
JD Pennington

Diigo in College/University - 248 views

Some questions: Is it possible to get an RSS feed of group annotated links that are no longer live pages, but are instead highlighted static pages? This way I can get a feed of a the links that ...

education diigo

Roland Gesthuizen

Collaboration Strategies in the Classroom - YouTube - 80 views

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    "This video explores the concept of collaboration, both ideologically and strategically. It provides some observations of the way a teacher may integrate collaboration into the classroom. Thanks to technology we are now able to collaborate on a global level. This offers new opportunities for the classroom. It is a teachers role in the 21st to empower their students with the literacy of collaboration."
Teenie Reddeck

50 Free Collaboration Tools That Are Awesome for Education | Accredited Online Colleges.com - 150 views

  • Thinkfree. The free services here include document creation and sharing, file sharing, collaboration, and more.
  •  Thinkfree . The free services here include document creation and sharing, file sharing, collaboration, and more.
  • students create real-time outlines collaboratively. Thinkature. Use this tool to collaborate, organize research and ideas, and prepare final projects.
  • ...2 more annotations...
  • ThinkFold. Perfect for the planning stages of a group project, ThinkFold helps  students create real-time outlines collaboratively.
  • wridea. A great way to keep brainstorming sessions documented and organized, this free tool is a must-have for groups working together.
Adrienne Michetti

Center for Interactive Learning and Collaboration (CILC): Advancing education through videoconferencing and other collaborative technologies. - Center for Interactive Learning and Collaboration - 2 views

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    Advancing learning through videoconferencing and other collaborative technologies. For teachers looking for collaborative projects for their classes, but also for online Professional Development.
Jason Schmidt

Collaborative Learning Home - Collaborative Learning - 78 views

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    Wiki from 2009 Learning@School conference. Contains lots of great collaborative tools and ideas for using collaboration in the classroom.
Steven Engravalle

MediaShift . How Twitter is Reinventing Collaboration Among Educators | PBS - 85 views

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    "Before the advent of Twitter, most educators I know had limited opportunities to collaborate with colleagues outside their building. Some subscribed to listservs or participated in online forums, but these outlets lacked critical mass; teachers also networked at in-person conferences and training sessions, but these isolated events didn't provide ongoing support. Enter Twitter. I've heard many educators say that Twitter is the most effective way to collaborate and that they've learned more with Twitter than they have from years of formal professional development."
Donal O' Mahony

Collaborative Problem Solving: PISA 2015 | eLearning Island - 38 views

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    "Collaborative problem solving is not a traditional domain, in that it is not explicitly taught as a school subject, rather embedded as a practice in the classroom" (PISA 2015 Draft Collaborative Problem Solving Framework p.27) - some thoughts from the context of education in Ireland
Tonya Thomas

Future Work Skills 2020 - 3 views

  • Transdisciplinarity: literacy in and ability to understand concepts across multiple disciplines. More about transdisciplinarity.Virtual collaboration: ability to work productively, drive engagement, and demonstrate presence as a member of a virtual team. More about virtual collaboration.Sense-making: ability to determine the deeper meaning or significance of what is being expressed. More about sense-making.Social intelligence: ability to connect to others in a deep and direct way, to sense and stimulate reactions and desired interactions. More about social intelligence.Cross-cultural competency: ability to operate in different cultural settings. More about cross-cultural competency.Cognitive load management: ability to discriminate and filter information for importance, and to understand how to maximize cognitive functioning using a variety of tools and techniques. More about cognitive load management.Novel and adaptive thinking: proficiency at thinking and coming up with solutions and responses beyond that which is rote or rule-based. More about novel and adaptive thinking.Computational thinking: ability to translate vast amounts of data into abstract concepts and to understand data-based reasoning. More about computational thinking.New media literacy: ability to critically assess and develop content that uses new media forms, and to leverage these media for persuasive communication. More about new media literacy. More about new media literacy.Design mindset: ability to represent and develop tasks and work processes for desired outcomes. More about design mindset.
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    "Transdisciplinarity: literacy in and ability to understand concepts across multiple disciplines. More about transdisciplinarity. Virtual collaboration: ability to work productively, drive engagement, and demonstrate presence as a member of a virtual team. More about virtual collaboration. Sense-making: ability to determine the deeper meaning or significance of what is being expressed. More about sense-making. Social intelligence: ability to connect to others in a deep and direct way, to sense and stimulate reactions and desired interactions. More about social intelligence. Cross-cultural competency: ability to operate in different cultural settings. More about cross-cultural competency. Cognitive load management: ability to discriminate and filter information for importance, and to understand how to maximize cognitive functioning using a variety of tools and techniques. More about cognitive load management. Novel and adaptive thinking: proficiency at thinking and coming up with solutions and responses beyond that which is rote or rule-based. More about novel and adaptive thinking. Computational thinking: ability to translate vast amounts of data into abstract concepts and to understand data-based reasoning. More about computational thinking. New media literacy: ability to critically assess and develop content that uses new media forms, and to leverage these media for persuasive communication. More about new media literacy. More about new media literacy. Design mindset: ability to represent and develop tasks and work processes for desired outcomes. More about design mindset."
Nigel Coutts

Collaborative Learning with Google Docs - The Learner's Way - 72 views

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    Something is missing from my classroom lately and I am quite happy to have seen it disappear. It is the traditional line at the teacher's desk formed by students awaiting feedback on a recently completed piece of writing. What has replaced this is our use of Google Docs and Slides as a tool for the collaborative development of ideas from initial thinking and strategising through to final editing and refinement. It has introduced a new workflow to the class that both streamlines the process of providing feedback, allows for greater detail and transforms the process into one that is richly collaborative.
Kathy Malsbenden

Social Bookmarking 2.0: Research, Share and Collaborate Online Using Diigo - Jason Rhode, Ph.D. - 48 views

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    Do you struggle to keep track of all your favorite Web sites and other online resources? Would you like to share the links to your favorite online resources with your colleagues or students? Using Diigo, you can both easily bookmark your favorite online resources in the cloud and annotate, share, and collaborate in new ways! This hands-on session will introduce the Diigo collaborative research tool and explore several practical applications for implementing collaborative resource sharing in the classroom.
Monica Lawrence

Educational Origami - Comparing 20th and 21st Century Educational Paradigms - 122 views

  •  Mainly collaborative some individual
  •  Mainly collaborative some individual
  •  Mainly collaborative some indi
  • ...2 more annotations...
  •  Mainly collaborative some indi vidual
  •  Mainly collaborative some indi vidual
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    Nice table comparing the way teaching was and where it might be going.
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    "Mainly collaborative"
Martin Burrett

oneDrum - Collaborate with Microsoft Office - 43 views

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    Ever wanted the full functionality of Microsoft Office with the collaborative element to Google Docs? Collaborate on documents in Microsoft Office with this great downloadable app. How very exciting! http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/ICT+&+Web+Tools
Thieme Hennis

About « OERRH - 19 views

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    "The Open Educational Resources Research Hub (OER Research Hub) provides a focus for research, designed to give answers to the overall question 'What is the impact of OER on learning and teaching practices?' and identify the particular influence of openness. We do this by working in collaboration with projects across four education sectors (K12, college, higher education and informal) extending a network of research with shared methods and shared results. By the end of this research we will have evidence for what works and when, but also established methods and instruments for broader engagement in researching the impact of openness on learning. OER are not just another educational innovation. They influence policy and change practices. In previous research (OpenLearn, Bridge to Success and OLnet) we have seen changes in institutions, teacher practice and in the effectiveness of learning. We integrate research alongside action to discover and support changes in broader initiatives. Our framework provides the means to gather data and the tools to tackle barriers. The project combines: A targeted collaboration program with existing OER projects An internationalfellowship program Networking to make connections A hub for research data and OER excellence in practice The collaborations cover different sectors and issues, these include: the opening up of classroom based teaching to open content; the large-scale decision points implied by open textbooks for community colleges; the extension of technology beyond textbook through eBook and simulation; the challenge of teacher training in India; and the ways that OER can support less formal approaches to learning. By basing good practice on practical experience and research we can help tackle practical problems whilst building the evidence bank needed by all."
Mariusz Leś

The Nerdy Teacher: What Makes Project Based Learning Effective? #Edchat #EngChat - 132 views

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    1. OWNERSHIP is key. For this project, the students were not listening to me on why Twain was or was not a racist, they were showing me and the rest of class what they thought. They were invested in winning their argument. They knew that their work was going to determine if he was guilty or not. Although I gave the assignment, the students were in charge the rest of the way. It was their project and they wanted to do it win. When students feel they own what they are doing, they will work harder. When the audience is larger, they want to impress everyone. These are not crazy ideas, they are the results of owning the work they are doing. OWNERSHIP is a major factor in the value of PBL. 2. CREATIVITY is the another major part of the PBL and is closely linked with OWNERSHIP. Students were allowed to be creative in their work as a lawyer or witness. Witnesses needed to stay within character, but could add their own elements on the witness stand. Allowing the students to create gives them a bigger sense of OWNERSHIP. 3. Another part of the PBL is the COLLABORATION. Students were working with each other trying to decide the best plan of attack. Witnesses would meet with their lawyers and discuss how the questions they were going to ask and how they should dress. The Jury worked on group projects researching the previous public opinions on Twain and his writing. Students were sharing ideas freely with one another. I had three sections of American Lit at the time, so I had three trails running. Lawyers would help others in the other classes and trash talk the opposing lawyers as well. It was all in good fun, but the COLLABORATION had students working hard with one another to accomplish this goal. 4. Depending on how you set up your project, CRITICAL THINKING, is also an important part of PBL. With my Twain Trail, students needed to think about both sides of the argument. Students needed to prepare their witnesses for potential cross-examination questions. They needed to
Xiaojing Jianping

How Listening and Sharing Help Shape Collaborative Learning Experiences | MindShift | KQED News - 30 views

  • 1. How Listening and Sharing Works
  • In school, getting people to share can be difficult. Learners may be diffident, or they may not have good strategies for sharing. Children often do not know how to offer constructive criticism or build on an idea. It can be helpful to give templates for sharing, such as two likes and a wish, where the “wish” is a constructive criticism or a building idea.
  • But more often than not, it is because one or more of five ingredients is missing: joint attention, listening, sharing, coordinating, and perspective taking.
  • ...7 more annotations...
  • Using a common visual anchor (e.g., a common diagram) can help people maintain joint visual attention.
  • Sharing operates on two levels: sharing common goals and sharing ideas.
  • Many college students dislike group projects. Some of this is naïve egoism and an unwillingness to compromise
  • Collaboration requires a great deal of turn-taking coordination.
  • It can be useful to establish collaborative structures and rules.
  • primary reason for collaborating is that people bring different ideas to the table. The first four ingredients—joint attention, listening, sharing, and coordinating—support the exchange of information. The fifth ingredient is understanding why people are offering the information they do. This often goes beyond what speakers can possibly show and say (see Chapter S). People need to understand the point of view behind what others are saying, so they can interpret it more fully. This requires perspective taking. This is where important learning takes place, because learners can gain a new way to think about matters. It can also help differentiate and clarify one’s own ideas. A conflict of opinions can enhance learning (Johnson & Johnson, 2009).
  • An interesting study on perspective taking (Kulkarni, Cambre, Kotturi, Bernstein, & Klemmer, 2015) occurred in a massive open online course (MOOC) with global participation. In their online discussions, learners were encouraged to review lecture content by relating it to their local context. The researchers placed people into low- or high-diversity groups based on the spread of geographic regions among participants. Students in the most geographically diverse discussion groups saw the highest learning gains, presumably because they had the opportunity to consider more different perspectives than geographically uniform groups did
Julia Gardiner

https://web.archive.org/web/20130414235801/http://www.pearsonassessments.com/hai/images/tmrs/Collaboration-Review.pdf - 30 views

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    Collaboration, collaborative learning,
Martin Burrett

MixBit - 72 views

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    This is an app and website from the creators of YouTube. It's a video creation platform where users shoot up to 16 seconds of video on their mobile device and mix it up collaboratively online into a feature film of up to an hour in length. Imagine a swarm of camera all capturing video for a collaborative project! http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/Video%2C+animation%2C+film+%26+Webcams
Martin Burrett

Conceptboard - Realtime Whiteboard Online Collaboration - 97 views

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    A superb, 'must try' collaborative whiteboard site. Invite collaborators to draw, write, screen capture and upload documents onto your whiteboard in real time. Great for webinars, distance learning, howework or group work in class. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/ICT+&+Web+Tools
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