Skip to main content

Home/ Diigo In Education/ Group items matching "collaboration "21st Century"" in title, tags, annotations or url

Group items matching
in title, tags, annotations or url

Sort By: Relevance | Date Filter: All | Bookmarks | Topics Simple Middle
Shannon Smith

Need resources to assist in creating a 21st century learner training/ professional deve... - 131 views

Thank you! This is great information! James McKee wrote: > Shannon, > > I was recently referred to this video of Michael Wesch who teaches cultural anthropology at Kansas State University. He ...

professional development 21st century learners technology

Mark Gleeson

21st Century Fluencies - 76 views

  •  
    This blogpost discusses the aims of the 21st Century Fluency Project This resource is the collaborative effort of a group of experienced educators and entrepreneurs who have united to share their experience and ideas, and create a project geared toward making learning relevant to life in our new digital age. Our purpose is to develop exceptional resources to assist in transforming learning to be relevant to life in the 21st Century. At the core of this project are our Curriculum Integration Kits - engaging, challenge based learning modules designed to cultivate the essential 21st Century Fluencies within the context of the required curriculum.
Mr. Eason

Educational Leadership:Teaching for the 21st Century:21st Century Skills: The Challenges Ahead - 119 views

  • the skills students need in the 21st century are not new.
  • Critical thinking and problem solving, for example, have been components of human progress throughout history
  • What's actually new is the extent to which changes in our economy and the world mean that collective and individual success depends on having such skills
  • ...27 more annotations...
  • Many reform efforts, from reducing class size to improving reading instruction, have devolved into fads or been implemented with weak fidelity to their core intent. The 21st century skills movement faces the same risk.
  • some of the rhetoric we have heard surrounding this movement suggests that with so much new knowledge being created, content no longer matters; that ways of knowing information are now much more important than information itself. Such notions contradict what we know about teaching and learning and raise concerns that the 21st century skills movement will end up being a weak intervention for the very students—low-income students and students of color—who most need powerful schools as a matter of social equity.
  • First, educators and policymakers must ensure that the instructional program is complete and that content is not shortchanged for an ephemeral pursuit of skills
  • Second, states, school districts, and schools need to revamp how they think about human capital in education—in particular how teachers are trained
  • Skills and knowledge are not separate, however, but intertwined.
  • inally, we need new assessments that can accurately measure richer learning and more complex tasks
  • In some cases, knowledge helps us recognize the underlying structure of a problem.
  • At other times, we know that we have a particular thinking skill, but domain knowledge is necessary if we are to use it.
  • if skills are independent of content, we could reasonably conclude that we can develop these skills through the use of any content. For example, if students can learn how to think critically about science in the context of any scientific material, a teacher should select content that will engage students (for instance, the chemistry of candy), even if that content is not central to the field. But all content is not equally important to mathematics, or to science, or to literature. To think critically, students need the knowledge that is central to the domain.
  • The importance of content in the development of thinking creates several challenges
  • first is the temptation to emphasize advanced, conceptual thinking too early in training
  • Another curricular challenge is that we don't yet know how to teach self-direction, collaboration, creativity, and innovation the way we know how to teach long division.
  • We must plan to teach skills in the context of particular content knowledge and to treat both as equally important.
  • But experience is not the same thing as practice. Experience means only that you use a skill; practice means that you try to improve by noticing what you are doing wrong and formulating strategies to do better. Practice also requires feedback, usually from someone more skilled than you are.
  • education leaders must be realistic about which skills are teachable. If we deem that such skills as collaboration and self-direction are essential, we should launch a concerted effort to study how they can be taught effectively rather than blithely assume that mandating their teaching will result in students learning them.
  • teachers don't use them.
  • Even when class sizes are reduced, teachers do not change their teaching strategies or use these student-centered method
  • these methods pose classroom management problems for teachers.
  • These methods also demand that teachers be knowledgeable about a broad range of topics and are prepared to make in-the-moment decisions as the lesson plan progresses.
  • constant juggling act
  • measures that encourage greater creativity, show how students arrived at answers, and even allow for collaboration.
  • But where will schools find the release time for such collaboration?
  • professional development is a massive undertaking.
  • Unfortunately, there is a widespread belief that teachers already know how to do this if only we could unleash them from today's stifling standards and accountability metrics. This notion romanticizes student-centered methods, underestimates the challenge of implementing such methods, and ignores the lack of capacity in the field today.
  • The first challenge is the cost.
  • greater collaboration among teachers.
  • When students first encounter new ideas, their knowledge is shallow and their understanding is bound to specific examples. They need exposure to varied examples before their understanding of a concept becomes more abstract and they can successfully apply that understanding to novel situations.
Nancy White

Educational Leadership:Best of Educational Leadership 2009-2010:21st Century Skills: The Challenges Ahead - 40 views

  • The debate is not about content versus skills. There is no responsible constituency arguing against ensuring that students learn how to think in school. Rather, the issue is how to meet the challenges of delivering content and skills in a rich way that genuinely improves outcomes for students.
    • Nancy White
       
      The skills help us learn content. The content gives us context for practicing and learning the skills. It is a symbiotic relationship.
  • Another curricular challenge is that we don't yet know how to teach self-direction, collaboration, creativity, and innovation the way we know how to teach long division. The plan ofcollaborationskills proponents seems to be to give students more experiences that will presumably develop these skills—for example, having them work in groups. But experience is not the same thing as practice. Experience means only that you use a skill; practice means that you try to improve by noticing what you are doing wrong and formulating strategies to do better. Practice also requires feedback, usually from someone more skilled than you are.
    • Nancy White
       
      We not only give them experience --but we must model these skills constantly.
  • A growing number of business leaders, politicians, and educators are united around the idea that students need
  • ...1 more annotation...
  • "21st century skills" to be successful today
Jennie Snyder

Lydia Dobyns: A '21st Century' Education Is SO Last Century - 33 views

  • We can't know what the classroom will look or feel like. We do know, however, that most school districts are organized to deliver education that inhibits rather than encourages innovation. That needs to change.
  • like "Deeper Learning" as a way to convey both the acquisition of knowledge and the transference/application of knowledge along with developing skills employers find valuable -- collaboration, communications and critical thinking
  • t's time to move on and work together to develop education systems that meet students where they live and provide a relevant education to develop cognitive and non-cognitive skills
  • ...4 more annotations...
  • Of course, schools and classroom practices need to be current -- what teacher or district leader would say that we should continue to teach the way we did back in the "good ol' days?" Can you show me a successful organization or business that prides itself on keeping things exactly the way they were?
  • We need to believe the adults delivering education services are capable of being innovative, adaptive and collaborative and welcome being accountable for student outcomes. Then we need to invest in this belief by providing both the professional development and the infrastructure to make this belief a reality for all students and all teachers.
  • Ultimately, it is about delivering core education in today's world by today's standards of success.
  • I believe this is the basic approach: Education needs to be more relevant and rigorous for students. Educational institutions need to be more engaging and empowering for teachers. A high school diploma needs to be more directly applicable and valued in the economy. These are attainable goals; all education investments should be measured against these objectives.
  •  
    Lydia Dobyns: A '21st Century' Education Is SO Last Century http://t.co/fieSUgnj #deeperlearning #edleader21
Brian Davies

Research & Reports | Office of Educational Technology - 25 views

  •  
    "DRAFT: Promoting Grit, Tenacity, and Perseverance-Critical Factors for Success in the 21st Century We face a critical need to prepare children and adolescents to thrive in the 21st century-an era of rapidly evolving technology, demanding and collaborative STEM knowledge work, changing workforce needs, economic volatility, and unacceptable achievement gaps. This report takes a close look at a core set of noncognitive factors-grit, tenacity, and perseverance-that are essential to an individual's capacity to strive for and succeed at important goals, and to persist in the face of an array of challenges encountered throughout schooling and life."
Monica Lawrence

Educational Origami - Comparing 20th and 21st Century Educational Paradigms - 122 views

  •  Mainly collaborative some individual
  •  Mainly collaborative some individual
  •  Mainly collaborative some indi
  • ...2 more annotations...
  •  Mainly collaborative some indi vidual
  •  Mainly collaborative some indi vidual
  •  
    Nice table comparing the way teaching was and where it might be going.
  •  
    "Mainly collaborative"
anonymous

A Web 2.0 Class: Students Learn 21st Century Skills, 21st Century , and Digital Citizenship | Edutopia - 113 views

  • A Web 2.0 Class: Students Learn 21st Century Skills, 21st Century , and Digital Citizenship
Elizabeth Resnick

How Schools Can Teach Innovation - WSJ.com - 5 views

  • problems can never be understood or solved in the context of a single academic discipline
  • all courses are interdisciplinary and based on the exploration of a problem or new opportunity.
  • young innovators are intrinsically motivated. T
  • ...6 more annotations...
  • The play is discovery-based learning that leads young people to find and pursue a passion, which evolves, over time, into a deeper sense of purpose.
  • Teachers need professional development to learn how to create hands-on, project-based, interdisciplinary courses.
  • Students should have
  • digital portfolios that demonstrate progressive mastery of the skills needed to innovate.
  • play, passion and purpose.
  • To succeed in the 21st-century economy, students must learn to analyze and solve problems, collaborate, persevere, take calculated risks and learn from failure.
  •  
    To succeed in the 21st-century economy, students must learn to analyze and solve problems, collaborate, persevere, take calculated risks and learn from failure. 
Mark McDonough

Diigo 101 - Student Learning with Diigo - 110 views

  • Diigo is much more than a simple web annotation or social bookmarking tool. It is an online research and collaborative research tool that integrates tags, digital highlights, interactive sticky notes, captured snapshots, and group-based collaboration, allowing a whole new process of online information management, learning, and teaching in the 21st Century.
    • terenceonline
       
      Good Summary of Diigo
  • My Network is a new Diigo social features that adds to the product's strength. My Network creates a "content-centric social network," in which people are connected by what they clip, tag, and highlight. Users will be able to collaborate with other users based not on who is a friend to whom, but rather by who is interested in what. My network delivers web content specifically tailored to a user interests and shows users with similar interest. Participation in a larger network is made possible with its community features that connects users with people with common interests; thus, building global communities around topics and knowledge, tags, and sites.
  • Digest of Internet Information, Groups and Other Stuff (Diigo) is a powerful free social bookmarking website with annotating capabilities.
    • Mark McDonough
       
      Bold the first letters of the Diigo acronym: Digest, Internet, Information, ...
  •  
    Diigo is much more than a simple web annotation or social bookmarking tool. It is an online research and collaborative research tool that integrates tags, digital highlights, interactive sticky notes, captured snapshots, and group-based collaboration, allowing a whole new process of online information management, learning, and teaching in the 21st Century. 
  •  
    This is a great resource on Diigo and how to use.
Greta Oppe

A Vision for 21st Century Learning - 112 views

  •  
    TED@Palm Springs presentation on game-based learning; creation of "immersive learning environments." Meyers, A. (2009). A Vision for 21st Century Learning [Video]. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mirxkzkxuf4
  •  
    I disliked this video. Is my classroom extraordinary? The rest of the classrooms in the U.S. have unmoving, silent children stuck in desks all day? The students don't talk to each other? They don't collaborate to solve problems? They don't read? They don't write in order to analyze and express opinions? They don't use math manipulatives, do science experiments, build, draw, and do projects? They don't laugh together, digress, and then get back on track? Because that's what we do. It doesn't strike me as a response to the Industrial Revolution as much as a response to students' curiosity and to their future needs. "If we get it right, kids won't even know they're learning something." So, we're doing it wrong if the kids are actually aware that they're learning? Better they should be metaphorically anesthetized by the computer experience? We don't want them inoculated against feeling the discomfort of struggle. Every respected neuroscientist on the planet says struggle is necessary to wire neurons together, which is the physical manifestation of learning. The simulation of the village looks very cool. I love computers. But if all their learning about ancient Rome is based on this simulation, where are the primary sources? Will students encounter any? Or is their experience of the village based on someone else's interpretation of primary sources? If so, then someone else gets to decide what is important to include in the Roman village. They get to choose and interpret the facts that are used to create the virtual ancient Roman experience. That goes against best practice teaching of the social sciences.
Holly Gerla

Digital-ID - home - 7 views

  •  
    A wiki created by two teachers with contributions from teachers and students regarding digital citizenship and related topics. Check the page: Student-Created Content
  • ...1 more comment...
  •  
    Lessons for digital citizenship
  •  
    Provide students, teachers, and administrators with a toolkit of reliable information, resources, and guidelines to help all of us learn how to be upstanding Digital Citizens who maintain a healthy Digital Identity (ID) in the 21st Century. Build a collaborative platform for teachers and students the world over to contribute to our ever-growing curriculum collaborations and student-created content.
  •  
    21st Century Citizenship wiki
Maggie Tsai

FL08 - 21st Century Researching with Diigo - PETE&C 2009 - 0 views

  • Program Description: Learn how to harness the powerful research tools and knowledge-sharing community of Diigo to take your students’ researching capabilities into the 21st century. Through the new Teacher Console and educational accounts your students can safely access the bookmarking and annotation features of Diigo and can collaborate through secure class groups.
Nigel Coutts

Collaboration & Connectedness the Key to Quality Teaching - 70 views

  •  
    Most teachers recognise the potential for collaboration between students and the importance of it as a component of acollaborationeducation and yet many do not take full advantage of the opportunities they have for collaboration as teachers.
Bill Genereux

YouMedia - 48 views

  •  
    YOUmedia is an innovative, 21st century teen learning space housed at the Chicago Public Library's downtown Harold Washington Library Center. YOUmedia was created to connect young adults, books, media, mentors, and institutions throughout the city of Chicago in one dynamic space designed to inspire 21st century and creativity.
Peter Beens

Free Teaching Resources, Tools, & Lesson Plans - Intel Education - 41 views

  •  
    Intel offers free, easily integrated tools and teaching resources to support collaborative student-centered learning. Our online thinking tools provide active learning places where students can engage in robust discussions, analyze complex information, pursue investigations, and solve problems. You'll also find teaching resources such as exemplary lesson plans, assessment strategies, and technology-enriched project ideas for all K-12 subjects. Developed by educators, these free tools and resources support 21st century learning, with project-based approaches in the classroom.
Michelle Lynn

Best Practices - 2 views

  • the first great thing about Diigo is that your bookmarks follow you wherever you go.  When you bookmark a site using your Diigo account, you can have access to it at work, home, the computer lab or library.  The other great thing is that once you bookmark it, you can share your book mark links with students and colleagues and they can all have access to your sites.   
    • Amy Cordova
       
      This would be the first reason to use Diigo in the classroom
  • The next big plus to Diigo is that you get to “tag” the sites you want to bookmark.  A tag is the classification system you determine so you can organize your bookmarks and find the link the next time you need it; this is known as a folksonomy. 
  • On the sticky note the teacher could ask questions and Diigo allows people to comment and reply to the questions on the sticky note.  Students could also add sticky notes for other students to comment on as well.  Another way to use the highlighting tool is that students could go through an article and highlight all of the vocabulary that they didn’t know and learn what it means prior to reading the article.  Or students could put sticky notes about questions they have when reading the text. 
    • yang hongmei
       
      在便条中,教师可以提出问题,其他人可以通过便条回复.学生通读全文,高亮显示他们不懂的内容,在正式阅读前把它们学会.学生还可以在阅读时就他们不懂的部分添加便条提问.对教师而言,利用diigo获取学生在阅读时的所想也是很重要的.
  • ...1 more annotation...
  • But, now let’s get to the “social” part of social bookmarking.  Let’s say you find a really awesome site for your unit on Greek Mythology, and you tag it on Diigo.  You see when you look at your bookmark list that 72 other people have tagged that exact same site.  You can see the lists of the other people who have tagged that site, and you might discover a 6th grade teacher in Wisconsin who has an amazing list of Greek mythology sites that you didn’t even know about.  Now you have taken advantage of the social part of the bookmarking process by adding some of those bookmarks to your list. 
  •  
    Diigo - 21st Century Tool for Research, Reading and 21st Century
  • ...1 more comment...
  •  
    Why Diigo?
  •  
    Diigo - 21st Century Tool for Research, Reading and 21st Century
  •  
    diigo的应用文章 great
Steve Ransom

Digital Storytelling Tools for Educators by Silvia Rosenthal Tolisano in Education & Language - 87 views

  •  
    Free to download this book. "This guide was written especially for educators, who want to teach 21st century skills, such as collaborating, communicating, and connecting, through digital storytelling"
Jay Swan

50 Really Cool Online Tools for Science Teachers - 153 views

  •  
    A 21st-century education revolves around the Internet for everything from collaboration, tools, lessons, and even earning degrees online. If you are looking for ways to integrate online learning into your science class, then take a look at these cool online tools that are just perfect for both teachers and students.
1 - 20 of 44 Next › Last »
Showing 20 items per page