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Cüneyt Birkök

International Journal of Human Sciences - 18 views

  • ©2002 Uluslararası İnsan Bilimleri Dergisi / International Journal of Human Sciences (ISSN:1303-5134) is an "Open access journal" that uses a funding model that does not charge readers or their institutions for access. From the BOAI definition of open access, users take the right of read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of these articles.
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    ©2002 International Journal of Human Sciences (ISSN:1303-5134) is an "Open access journal" that uses a funding model that does not charge readers or their institutions for access. From the BOAI definition of open access, users take the right of read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of these articles. Creative Commons License # We look forward to work with scholars from all over the world and in any subject fields. All academicians (hold a Ph.D degree) are welcomed. # Refereeing pre-request is to supervise at least three (Master) or (Doctoral) thesis. # We elaborate scientific branches mentioned in the about page according to any requests from referees. # Referees are responsible to review and approve submitted works in English language and subject fields by filling out this evaluation form. # To join with editorial board, Login/Register to this journal and then submit your full academic vitae with your subject fields you are able to review to journal editor (editor@insanbilimleri.com). Please fill completely out all the information asked (such as your bio statement, languages, institution etc.) at user profile page.
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    ©2002 International Journal of Human Sciences (ISSN:1303-5134) is an "Open access journal" that uses a funding model that does not charge readers or their institutions for access. From the BOAI definition of open access, users take the right of read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of these articles. Creative Commons License # We look forward to work with scholars from all over the world and in any subject fields. All academicians (hold a Ph.D degree) are welcomed. # Refereeing pre-request is to supervise at least three (Master) or (Doctoral) thesis. # We elaborate scientific branches mentioned in the about page according to any requests from referees. # Referees are responsible to review and approve submitted works in English language and subject fields by filling out this evaluation form. # To join with editorial board, Login/Register to this journal and then submit your full academic vitae with your subject fields you are able to review to journal editor (editor@insanbilimleri.com). Please fill completely out all the information asked (such as your bio statement, languages, institution etc.) at user profile page.
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    ©2002 International Journal of Human Sciences (ISSN:1303-5134) is an "Open access journal" that uses a funding model that does not charge readers or their institutions for access. From the BOAI definition of open access, users take the right of read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of these articles. Creative Commons License # We look forward to work with scholars from all over the world and in any subject fields. All academicians (hold a Ph.D degree) are welcomed. # Refereeing pre-request is to supervise at least three (Master) or (Doctoral) thesis. # We elaborate scientific branches mentioned in the about page according to any requests from referees. # Referees are responsible to review and approve submitted works in English language and subject fields by filling out this evaluation form. # To join with editorial board, Login/Register to this journal and then submit your full academic vitae with your subject fields you are able to review to journal editor (editor@insanbilimleri.com). Please fill completely out all the information asked (such as your bio statement, languages, institution etc.) at user profile page.
onepulledthread

Branch - 34 views

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    newly available resource for having online conversations.
paul lowe

Web 2.0 Storytelling: Emergence of a New Genre (EDUCAUSE Review) | EDUCAUSE CONNECT - 3 views

  • A story has a beginning, a middle, and a cleanly wrapped-up ending. Whether told around a campfire, read from a book, or played on a DVD, a story goes from point A to B and then C. It follows a trajectory, a Freytag Pyramid—perhaps the line of a human life or the stages of the hero's journey. A story is told by one person or by a creative team to an audience that is usually quiet, even receptive. Or at least that’s what a story used to be, and that’s how a story used to be told. Today, with digital networks and social media, this pattern is changing. Stories now are open-ended, branching, hyperlinked, cross-media, participatory, exploratory, and unpredictable. And they are told in new ways: Web 2.0 storytelling picks up these new types of stories and runs with them, accelerating the pace of creation and participation while revealing new directions for narratives to flow.
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    A story has a beginning, a middle, and a cleanly wrapped-up ending. Whether told around a campfire, read from a book, or played on a DVD, a story goes from point A to B and then C. It follows a trajectory, a Freytag Pyramid-perhaps the line of a human life or the stages of the hero's journey. A story is told by one person or by a creative team to an audience that is usually quiet, even receptive. Or at least that's what a story used to be, and that's how a story used to be told. Today, with digital networks and social media, this pattern is changing. Stories now are open-ended, branching, hyperlinked, cross-media, participatory, exploratory, and unpredictable. And they are told in new ways: Web 2.0 storytelling picks up these new types of stories and runs with them, accelerating the pace of creation and participation while revealing new directions for narratives to flow.
Roland Gesthuizen

Education Week's Digital Directions: Schools Open Doors to Students' Mobile Devices - 44 views

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    At Oak Hills High School in suburban Cincinnati, students returned from summer break to learn they were free not only to bring their mobile devices to school, but also to use them-at their teachers' discretion-to connect to the school's wireless network to do their work .. In Chicago, the Mikva Challenge's student-leadership branch suggested in an August report that the city's public schools allow students to use their own smartphones on campus for learning.
Marge Runkle

Data.gov - 2 views

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    The purpose of Data.gov is to increase public access to high value, machine readable datasets generated by the executive branch of the federal government.
Martin Burrett

WiseMapping - 123 views

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    A good mindmapping site. Add branches easily and illustrate with colourful icons. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/ICT+&+Web+Tools
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    This site has ALL KINDS of really cool stuff! Thanks.
Suchada Rajca

ScienceDirect - International Journal of Pharmaceutics : Dendrimer toxicity: Let's meet the challenge - 9 views

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    Dendrimers are well-defined, versatile polymeric architecture with properties resembling biomolecules. Dendritic polymers emerged as outstanding carrier in modern medicine system because of its derivatisable branched architecture and flexibility in modifying it in numerous ways. Dendritic scaffold has been found to be suitable carrier for a variety of drugs including anticancer, anti-viral, anti-bacterial, antitubercular etc., with capacity to improve solubility and bioavailability of poorly soluble drugs. In spite of extensive applicability in pharmaceutical field, the use of dendrimers in biological system is constrained because of inherent toxicity associated with them. This toxicity is attributed to the interaction of surface cationic charge of dendrimers with negatively charged biological membranes in vivo. Interaction of dendrimers with biological membranes results in membrane disruption via nanohole formation, membrane thinning and erosion.
Christopher Lee

Why I Like Prezi - 0 views

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    Why I Like Prezi In my life, I have given a *lot* of presentations. In high school, they were presentations on group projects. In university, they were presentations on research projects. At Google, they're presentations on how to use our APIs. When I first started giving presentations, I used Powerpoint, like everyone else. But I kept thinking there must be a better way, and I experimented with other options - flash interfaces, interactive Javascript apps. Then I discovered Prezi, and it has become my presentation tool of choice. Prezi is an online tool for creating presentations - but it's not just a Powerpoint clone, like the Zoho or Google offering. When you first create a Prezi, you're greeted with a blank canvas and a small toolbox. You can write text, insert images, and draw arrows. You can draw frames (visible or hidden) around bits of content, and then you can define a path from one frame to the next frame. That path is your presentation. It's like being able to draw your thoughts on a whiteboard, and then instructing a camera where to go and what to zoom into. It's a simple idea, but I love it. Here's why: It forces me to "shape" my presentation. A slide deck is always linear in form, with no obvious structure of ideas inside of it. Each of my Prezis has a structure, and each structure is different. The structure is visual, but it supports a conceptual structure. One structure might be 3 main ideas, with rows of ideas for each one. Another might be 1 main idea, with a circular branching of subideas. Having a structure helps me to have more of a point to my presentations, and to realize the core ideas of them. It makes it easy to go from brainstorming stage to presentation stage, all in the same tool. I can write a bunch of thoughts, insert some images, and easily move them around, cluster them, re-order them, etc. I can figure out the structure of my presentation by looking at what I have laid out, and seeing how they fit together. Some people do this
Gaby K. Slezák

Easygenerator - Onlinekurse erstellen mit vielen Features - 12 views

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    Schnell und intuitiv interaktive Onlinekurse oder Lernmaterialien erstellen und einsetzen! Viele moderne didaktische Mittel zur Erstellung von Kursen, Quizzes u.v.m. Unterschiedliche Fragestellungen inkl. Lückentext und Hotspots wählen, Lernpfade (beta), branched Szenarios (Aufpreis), Integration von Voiceovers und Video, Ab 29 US$/Monat. *Kostenlose Version zum Einstieg* mit max. 2 Fragetypen, 3 Kursen und 10 Teilnehmern. Ähnlich wie GoConqr, allerdings in der lizensierten Version mit viel mehr professionellen Funktionen.
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    Kostenlos starten
Martin Burrett

The danger of colour stereotypes by @BoltCallum - 5 views

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    "Colours promote such emotion and are attributed to everything we see every day. Children are taught from a very young age that the sky and the ocean are blue, the grass and leaves are green, that the sun, sand and sunflowers are yellow and the night is black. But I ask you, how often have you looked at the ocean and seen green, not blue or looked up into the branches and seen a selection of oranges, yellows, browns and reds not a blanket of green. I am not suggesting that we shouldn't teach children these colour clichés, at a young age they are their first experiences of colour and form the bases of many of their first art pieces."
anonymous

This Exquisite Forest - 72 views

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    This site is a collaborative online drawing and animation project from Google and the UK's Tate Modern art gallery. Draw part of a picture and add to other people's creation. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/Art%2C+Craft+%26+Design
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    An online art project developed by Google, this site is a place for digital storytelling through pictures, not words. Students can work collaboratively to create a short animated story, with each animation building off the previous branches. Students can create their own seeds & invite others to grow a tree with them. Before students can create their own seeds, they do have to contribute to an already existing tree. If a student does not feel they can express their words with an animation, think about having the students pair up. Have one student become an author & write an outline of the story, while the other student draws the animation of the story.
Phil Higgins

TakingITGlobal - Inspire. Inform. Involve. - 40 views

    • Phil Higgins
       
      This seems like it can be a great way to harness the youth's appetite for Web 2.0. I am seeking a collaboration project with another school in some other part of the world other than the United States. I would like to group my students on Diigo with student at another school to work on something together. Anyone interested?
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    Hi Phil, Not sure if you want to use the environment or sustainability as theme, but Caretakers of the Environment International (CEI) partners are often seeking ongoing collaboration with environmental projects that students can share. It might take some digging, but I suggest going to http://www.caretakers4all.org, click on some of the national branch links and try connecting with people. I coordinate a group from Salem, OR and we have partners in Chicago and NY. Good luck!
Liz Dodds

Our Courts - Homepage - 6 views

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    A free computer game for teenagers created with the help of former Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor has made its online debut. "Supreme Decision," the first of several planned web-based games, went online in August as part of a project called Our Courts. In it, students can play a Supreme Court law clerk helping a justice with a tie-breaking vote over a First Amendment case. Backed by the Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law at Arizona State University and Georgetown University, the Our Courts project is designed to teach middle school students about the Constitution and the courts. O'Connor, the first woman to serve on the Supreme Court, has said more people can name an "American Idol" judge than the three branches of government. Besides teaching about civics, she hopes the Our Courts project will help students learn how to analyze problems and develop arguments. In "Supreme Decision," students play a law clerk and must help fictional Justice Irene Waters write the majority opinion on whether a school can ban students from wearing music band T-shirts. Another game, called "Do I Have a Right," will be released soon. In that game, students will play the director of a constitutional law firm who must decide which amendment resolves a problem posed by a client.
Michele Amato

The History Place - A New Nation - 53 views

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    The final timeline of the New Nation-The United States of America.
Dallas McPheeters

Nearly 1 in 4 fails military exam | Around the Web | eSchoolNews.com - 27 views

  • 23 percent of recent high school graduates don’t get the minimum score needed on the enlistment test to join any branch of the military
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    Interesting report portends a bleak trend?
anonymous

Library Resources - 111 views

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    SBISD start research here
D. S. Koelling

5 Myths About the 'Information Age' - The Chronicle Review - The Chronicle of Higher Education - 0 views

  • 1. "The book is dead." Wrong: More books are produced in print each year than in the previous year. One million new titles will appear worldwide in 2011. In one day in Britain—"Super Thursday," last October 1—800 new works were published.
  • 2. "We have entered the information age." This announcement is usually intoned solemnly, as if information did not exist in other ages. But every age is an age of information, each in its own way and according to the media available at the time.
  • I mention these misconceptions because I think they stand in the way of understanding shifts in the information environment. They make the changes appear too dramatic. They present things ahistorically and in sharp contrasts—before and after, either/or, black and white. A more nuanced view would reject the common notion that old books and e-books occupy opposite and antagonistic extremes on a technological spectrum. Old books and e-books should be thought of as allies, not enemies.
  • ...7 more annotations...
  • 4. "Libraries are obsolete." Everywhere in the country librarians report that they have never had so many patrons. At Harvard, our reading rooms are full. The 85 branch libraries of the New York Public Library system are crammed with people.
  • 5. "The future is digital." True enough, but misleading. In 10, 20, or 50 years, the information environment will be overwhelmingly digital, but the prevalence of electronic communication does not mean that printed material will cease to be important. Research in the relatively new discipline of book history has demonstrated that new modes of communication do not displace old ones, at least not in the short run.
  • 3. "All information is now available online." The absurdity of this claim is obvious to anyone who has ever done research in archives. Only a tiny fraction of archival material has ever been read, much less digitized. Most judicial decisions and legislation, both state and federal, have never appeared on the Web. The vast output of regulations and reports by public bodies remains largely inaccessible to the citizens it affects. Google estimates that 129,864,880 different books exist in the world, and it claims to have digitized 15 million of them—or about 12 percent.
  • Last year the sale of e-books (digitized texts designed for hand-held readers) doubled, accounting for 10 percent of sales in the trade-book market. This year they are expected to reach 15 or even 20 percent. But there are indications that the sale of printed books has increased at the same time.
  • Many of us worry about a decline in deep, reflective, cover-to-cover reading. We deplore the shift to blogs, snippets, and tweets. In the case of research, we might concede that word searches have advantages, but we refuse to believe that they can lead to the kind of understanding that comes with the continuous study of an entire book. Is it true, however, that deep reading has declined, or even that it always prevailed?
  • Writing looks as bad as reading to those who see nothing but decline in the advent of the Internet. As one lament puts it: Books used to be written for the general reader; now they are written by the general reader. The Internet certainly has stimulated self-publishing, but why should that be deplored? Many writers with important things to say had not been able to break into print, and anyone who finds little value in their work can ignore it.
  • One could cite other examples of how the new technology is reinforcing old modes of communication rather than undermining them. I don't mean to minimize the difficulties faced by authors, publishers, and readers, but I believe that some historically informed reflection could dispel the misconceptions that prevent us from making the most of "the information age"—if we must call it that.
anonymous

CyberSafe Parents Event - 29 views

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    On Tuesday 28th August, Coomera Anglican College will be hosting the ACMA CyberSmart Outreach and a representative from Task Force Argos, the branch of the QLD Police Service responsible for the investigation of on-line child exploitation and abuse. Parents and teachers from around the Coomera District are invited to attend this free event.
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