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Sharin Tebo

Could Rubric-Based Grading Be the Assessment of the Future? | MindShift | KQED News - 6 views

  • rubric-based alternative
  • First, they set out to define the essential learning outcomes that faculty, employers and accreditors saw as important.
  • The faculty worked together to write rubrics (called
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  • They went through norming sessions where each person would score a piece of student work using the rubric, and they’d come together to make sure people were assigning a similar grade.
  • formative feedback
  • body of evidence
  • cross-disciplinary
  • authentic work
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    Moving to a rubric-based system in University
MaryLiz Jones

15 Tools For Better Project-Based Learning - 320 views

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    many traditional activities but with links to tools that can help
psmiley

C: Project Based Learning - 3 views

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    Pinterest resources for PBL
Matt Renwick

Passion Based Learning, Week 4: Do One Thing Really Well | Reading By Example - 45 views

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    Any time when we can put students in the role of teacher can be a benefit to everyone. I wouldn't say passion-based, student-driven learning is any less work than a more traditional model of instruction, but in this context, I could not image a better way to teach.
Martin Burrett

Grouping students into ability-based sets holds back less able pupils - 18 views

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    "Students classed as less able are being hindered by being grouped into ability-based sets, according to new research published today in the Cambridge Journal of Education. Teachers' expectations of pupils in lower sets, which are based on their prior academic record and closely tied to the belief that their behaviour will be more challenging, could instil a damaging 'culture of dependency' on teachers among these groups."
Tim Hornbacher

Standards Based Assessment w/ Bloom's Taxonomy - 281 views

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    Looking for a new way to motivate your students who don't like to do homework? Give standards based assessment a try....
Jay Swan

Problem-based Learning in Science - 43 views

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    From site: "The best way for students to learn science is to experience problems that challenge science, and the thought, habits of mind and actions associated with trying to solve them. This implies opportunities for authentic, inquiry-based learning. Problem-based learning (PBL) is a powerful vehicle for this, in which a real-world problem becomes a context for students to investigate, in depth, what they need to know and want to know (Checkly, 1997). It is a robust, constructivist process, shaped and directed primarily by the student, with the instructor as metacognitive coach."
Deborah Baillesderr

Top Project Based Learning Ideas and Lesson Plans You Will Find On the Web - EdTechReview™ (ETR) - 119 views

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    "Below are some of the best project based learning ideas and lesson plans you will find on web."
Melissa Enderle

SHOW®/WORLD - A New Way To Look At The World - 150 views

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    Interactive mapping website that takes demographic, economic, environmental, and political data sets and creates maps based on those data. Size of each country changes based on the particular data. Downloadable and embeddable.
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    A visual way of looking at statistics
Michele Brown

Behold | - 4 views

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    About Behold BeholdTM is a search engine for high-quality Flickr images. It aims to answer your queries based on what is inside the images -- at the pixel level. It offers a completely new way to search for images, using techniques of computer vision. It is different to standard image search engines, such as Flickr or Google, because those search through images using only image tags and filenames. Behold looks for high quality images, so you don't have to sift through hundreds of poorly taken pictures to find a good one. Behold uses both aesthetic and technical quality indicators to find some of the best images available online. Behold draws computational power from Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) to handle large volumes of images. Features Behold is capable of recognising a number of visual concepts in pictures. You can ask Behold to return images that look like one of these concepts. This new type of search can be flexibly combined with regular text-based search. For example you can ask Behold to return images tagged with the word 'london' that look like pictures of buildings (try it!). You can also filter text-based image search results based on what the images actually look like. Both of these features are demonstrated in these videos. With a newly introduced feature, Behold goes one step further and automatically suggests visual filters after analysing the words in your query. It shows you what your search results would look like if you apply one of these filters, so you save time on finding the right one.
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    Search High Quality Flickr Images.
BalancEd Tech

Sowing the Seeds for a More Creative Society - 42 views

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    "the "creative thinking spiral." In this pro- cess, people imagine what they want to do, create a project based on their ideas, play with their creations, share their ideas and creations with others, and reflect on their experiences-all of which leads them to imagine new ideas and new projects. As students go through this process, over and over, they learn to develop their own ideas, try them out, test the boundaries, experiment with alternatives, get input from others, and generate new ideas based on their experiences."
Jay Swan

Pterosaur.net :: Home - 19 views

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    From the site: "This website was conceived at the 2007 Flugsaurier pterosaur research meeting in Munich when we, a collection of pterosaur researchers and artists directly working with us realised that there was no comprehensive, high quality website dedicated to this popular group of prehistoric animals. This acts in stark contrast to a number of excellent dinosaur-based websites and, frankly, we couldn't quite figure out why when pterosaurs are equally famous, popular and, in some respects, better known than their dinosaur cousins. With this in mind, we set out to create a pterosaur based website that: figure * Presents up-to-date information on pterosaurs in an accessible fashion * Sources information from the primary scientific literature * Is written by qualified, experienced pterosaur researchers * Can reflect the active research occuring in pterosaur science * Provides professionally produced pterosaur art and photographs of pterosaur specimens"
Lauren Rosen

Listen and Write - Dictation - 76 views

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    Great resource for practicing dictation based on real news stories. Large library in English. Several other languages offered including Japanese, Hebrew, Polish, and many others.
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    Great resource for practicing dictation based on real news stories. Large library in English. Several other languages offered including Japanese, Hebrew, Polish, and many others.
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    Great resource for practicing dictation based on real news stories. Large library in English. Several other languages offered including Japanese, Hebrew, Polish, and many others.
Wayne Holly

7 Brilliant Story-based eLearning Examples: "e" is for emotional, experiential « Designing Impact - 83 views

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    7 Brilliant Story-based eLearning Examples: "e" is for emotional, experiential
Greta Oppe

A Vision for 21st Century Learning - 112 views

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    TED@Palm Springs presentation on game-based learning; creation of "immersive learning environments." Meyers, A. (2009). A Vision for 21st Century Learning [Video]. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mirxkzkxuf4
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    I disliked this video. Is my classroom extraordinary? The rest of the classrooms in the U.S. have unmoving, silent children stuck in desks all day? The students don't talk to each other? They don't collaborate to solve problems? They don't read? They don't write in order to analyze and express opinions? They don't use math manipulatives, do science experiments, build, draw, and do projects? They don't laugh together, digress, and then get back on track? Because that's what we do. It doesn't strike me as a response to the Industrial Revolution as much as a response to students' curiosity and to their future needs. "If we get it right, kids won't even know they're learning something." So, we're doing it wrong if the kids are actually aware that they're learning? Better they should be metaphorically anesthetized by the computer experience? We don't want them inoculated against feeling the discomfort of struggle. Every respected neuroscientist on the planet says struggle is necessary to wire neurons together, which is the physical manifestation of learning. The simulation of the village looks very cool. I love computers. But if all their learning about ancient Rome is based on this simulation, where are the primary sources? Will students encounter any? Or is their experience of the village based on someone else's interpretation of primary sources? If so, then someone else gets to decide what is important to include in the Roman village. They get to choose and interpret the facts that are used to create the virtual ancient Roman experience. That goes against best practice teaching of the social sciences.
Marsha Ratzel

Myth-Busters: It's not what you don't know that concerns me. It's what you know that is not true that concerns me. | Brain Based Learning - Jensen Learning News on Brain Based Teaching - 122 views

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    Simple techniques to engage the student's brain power.
Martin Burrett

English Grammar Lessons - 89 views

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    A simple text based site with good infomation and examples of English grammer. Use the flash based exercises to practise what you students have learned. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/English+As+An+Additional+Language
Robert Parker

Andragogy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - 35 views

  • Andragogy consists of learning strategies focused on adults. It is often interpreted as the process of engaging adult learners with the structure of learning experience. The term ‘andragogy’ has been used in different times and countries with various connotations
  • Knowles asserted that andragogy (Greek: "man-leading") should be distinguished from the more commonly used pedagogy (Greek: "child-leading"). Knowles' theory can be stated with six assumptions related to motivation of adult learning:[1][2] Adults need to know the reason for learning something (Need to Know) Experience (including error) provides the basis for learning activities (Foundation). Adults need to be responsible for their decisions on education; involvement in the planning and evaluation of their instruction (Self-concept). Adults are most interested in learning subjects having immediate relevance to their work and/or personal lives (Readiness). Adult learning is problem-centered rather than content-oriented (Orientation). Adults respond better to internal versus external motivators (Motivation). The term has been used by some to allow discussion of contrast between self-directed and 'taught' education
    • Tammy Sanders
       
      Andragogy - man-leading as in leading man Pedagogy - child-leading as in leading children
    • Robert Parker
       
      I like this term, it reflects much of waht happens in higher education as the springboard for life-long learning
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    Andragogy From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Andragogy consists of learning strategies focused on adults. It is often interpreted as the process of engaging adult learners with the structure of learning experience. The term 'andragogy' has been used in different times and countries with various connotations. Nowadays there exist mainly three understandings: 1. In many countries there is a growing conception of 'andragogy' as the scholarly approach to the learning of adults. In this connotation andragogy is the science of understanding (= theory) and supporting (= practice) lifelong and lifewide education of adults. 2. Especially in the USA, 'andragogy' in the tradition of Malcolm Knowles, labels a specific theoretical and practical approach, based on a humanistic conception of self-directed and autonomous learners and teachers as facilitators of learning. 3. Widely, an unclear use of andragogy can be found, with its meaning changing (even in the same publication) from 'adult education practice' or 'desirable values' or 'specific teaching methods,' to 'reflections' or 'academic discipline' and/or 'opposite to childish pedagogy', claiming to be 'something better' than just 'Adult Education'. The oldest document using the term "Andragogik": Kapp, Alexander (1833): Platon's Erziehungslehre, als Pädagogik für die Einzelnen und als Staatspädagogik. Leipzig. Originally used by Alexander Kapp (a German educator) in 1833, andragogy was developed into a theory of adult education by the American educator Malcolm Knowles. Knowles asserted that andragogy (Greek: "man-leading") should be distinguished from the more commonly used pedagogy (Greek: "child-leading"). Knowles' theory can be stated with six assumptions related to motivation of adult learning:[1][2] Adults need to know the reason for learning something (Need to Know) Experience (including error) provides the basis for learning activities (Foundation). Adults need to be
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    Really not seeing the difference in how children and adults learn here. I have heard the term first about 20 or more years ago. From this definition the principals behind it are no different from those behind what a good learning environment is for all ages. What changes is the content not that the student, regardless of age, leads in their own learning facilitated by a trained practitioner.
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    "Andragogy" is another sexist term, using "andro" = male to stand for all humanity. Why wouldn't it by called "Gynogogy"? Can't we use a different term? Bring the concept up-do-date from 1833?
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    Andragogy From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Andragogy consists of learning strategies focused on adults. It is often interpreted as the process of engaging adult learners with the structure of learning experience. The term 'andragogy' has been used in different times and countries with various connotations. Nowadays there exist mainly three understandings: 1. In many countries there is a growing conception of 'andragogy' as the scholarly approach to the learning of adults. In this connotation andragogy is the science of understanding (= theory) and supporting (= practice) lifelong and lifewide education of adults. 2. Especially in the USA, 'andragogy' in the tradition of Malcolm Knowles, labels a specific theoretical and practical approach, based on a humanistic conception of self-directed and autonomous learners and teachers as facilitators of learning. 3. Widely, an unclear use of andragogy can be found, with its meaning changing (even in the same publication) from 'adult education practice' or 'desirable values' or 'specific teaching methods,' to 'reflections' or 'academic discipline' and/or 'opposite to childish pedagogy', claiming to be 'something better' than just 'Adult Education'. The oldest document using the term "Andragogik": Kapp, Alexander (1833): Platon's Erziehungslehre, als Pädagogik für die Einzelnen und als Staatspädagogik. Leipzig. Originally used by Alexander Kapp (a German educator) in 1833, andragogy was developed into a theory of adult education by the American educator Malcolm Knowles. Knowles asserted that andragogy (Greek: "man-leading") should be distinguished from the more commonly used pedagogy (Greek: "child-leading"). Knowles' theory can be stated with six assumptions related to motivation of adult learning:[1][2] Adults need to know the reason for learning something (Need to Know) Experience (including error) provides the basis for learning activities (Foundation). Adults need to be
  •  
    Andragogy From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Andragogy consists of learning strategies focused on adults. It is often interpreted as the process of engaging adult learners with the structure of learning experience. The term 'andragogy' has been used in different times and countries with various connotations. Nowadays there exist mainly three understandings: 1. In many countries there is a growing conception of 'andragogy' as the scholarly approach to the learning of adults. In this connotation andragogy is the science of understanding (= theory) and supporting (= practice) lifelong and lifewide education of adults. 2. Especially in the USA, 'andragogy' in the tradition of Malcolm Knowles, labels a specific theoretical and practical approach, based on a humanistic conception of self-directed and autonomous learners and teachers as facilitators of learning. 3. Widely, an unclear use of andragogy can be found, with its meaning changing (even in the same publication) from 'adult education practice' or 'desirable values' or 'specific teaching methods,' to 'reflections' or 'academic discipline' and/or 'opposite to childish pedagogy', claiming to be 'something better' than just 'Adult Education'. The oldest document using the term "Andragogik": Kapp, Alexander (1833): Platon's Erziehungslehre, als Pädagogik für die Einzelnen und als Staatspädagogik. Leipzig. Originally used by Alexander Kapp (a German educator) in 1833, andragogy was developed into a theory of adult education by the American educator Malcolm Knowles. Knowles asserted that andragogy (Greek: "man-leading") should be distinguished from the more commonly used pedagogy (Greek: "child-leading"). Knowles' theory can be stated with six assumptions related to motivation of adult learning:[1][2] Adults need to know the reason for learning something (Need to Know) Experience (including error) provides the basis for learning activities (Foundation). Adults need to be
Lisa DuFur

Mapping America - Census Bureau 2005-9 American Community Survey - NYTimes.com - 40 views

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    Browse local data from the Census Bureau's American Community Survey, based on samples from 2005 to 2009. Because these figures are based on samples, they are subject to a margin of error, particularly in places with a low population, and are best regarded as estimates. Create tons of lessons around this data. WOW
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