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Ian Woods

AJET 26(3) Drexler (2010) - The networked student model for construction of personal learning environments: Balancing teacher control and student autonomy - 77 views

  • Web application(networked studentcomponent) Tool usedin test case Student activitylevel of structure Social bookmarking (RSS) Delicioushttp://delicious.com/ Set up the account Subscribe to each others accounts Bookmark and read 10 reliable websites that reflect the content of chosen topic Add and read at least 3 additional sites each week. News and it alert (RSS) Google Alerthttp://www.google.com/alerts Create a Google Alert of keywords associated with selected topic Read news and its on that topic that are delivered via email daily Subscribe to appropriate its in reader News and it reader (RSS) Google Readerhttp://reader.google.com Search for its devoted to chosen topic Subscribe to its to keep track of updates Personal it (RSS) itgerhttp://www.itger.com Create a personal it Post a personal reflection each day of the content found and experiences related to the use of personal learning environment Students subscribe to each others its in reader Internet search (information management, contacts, and synchronous communication) Google Scholarhttp://scholar.google.com/ Conduct searches in Google Scholar and library databases for scholarly works. Bookmark appropriate sites Consider making contact with expert for video conference Podcasts (RSS) itunesUhttp://www.apple.com/itunes/whatson/itunesu.html Search itunesU for podcasts related to topic Subscribe to at least 2 podcasts if possible Video conferencing (contacts and synchronous communication) Skypehttp://www.skype.com Identify at least one subject matter expert to invite to Skype with the class. Content gathering/ digital notebook Evernotehttp://evernote.com/ Set up account Use Evernote to take notes on all content collected via other tools Content synthesis Wikispaceshttp://www.wikispaces.com Post final project on personal page of class wiki The process and tools are overwhelming to students if presented all at once. As with any instructional design, the teacher determines the pace at which the students best assimilate each new learning tool. For this particular project, a new tool was introduced each day over two weeks. Once the construction process was complete, there were a number of personal web page aggregators that could have been selected to bring everything together in one place. Options at the time included iGoogle, PageFlakes, NetVibes, and Symbaloo. These sites offer a means to compile or pull together content from a variety of web applications. A web widget or gadget is a bit of code that is executed within the personal web page to pull up external content from other sites. The students in this case designed the personal web page using the gadgets needed in the format that best met their learning goals. Figure 3 is an instructor example of a personal webpage that includes the reader, email, personal it, note taking program, and social bookmarks on one page. The personal learning environment can take the place of a traditional textbook, though does not preclude the student from using a textbook or accessing one or more numerous open source texts that may be available for the research topic. The goal is to access content from many sources to effectively meet the learning objectives. The next challenge is to determine whether those objectives have been met. Figure 3: Personal web page compiles learning tools
  • Table 2: Personal learning environment toolset Web application (networked student component) Tool used in test case Student activity level of structure Social bookmarking (RSS) Delicious http://delicious.com/ Set up the account Subscribe to each others accounts Bookmark and read 10 reliable websites that reflect the content of chosen topic Add and read at least 3 additional sites each week. News and it alert (RSS) Google Alert http://www.google.com/alerts Create a Google Alert of keywords associated with selected topic Read news and its on that topic that are delivered via email daily Subscribe to appropriate its in reader News and it reader (RSS) Google Reader http://reader.google.com Search for its devoted to chosen topic Subscribe to its to keep track of updates Personal it (RSS) itger http://www.itger.com Create a personal it Post a personal reflection each day of the content found and experiences related to the use of personal learning environment Students subscribe to each others its in reader Internet search (information management, contacts, and synchronous communication) Google Scholar http://scholar.google.com/ Conduct searches in Google Scholar and library databases for scholarly works. Bookmark appropriate sites Consider making contact with expert for video conference Podcasts (RSS) itunesU http://www.apple.com/itunes/ whatson/itunesu.html Search itunesU for podcasts related to topic Subscribe to at least 2 podcasts if possible Video conferencing (contacts and synchronous communication) Skype http://www.skype.com Identify at least one subject matter expert to invite to Skype with the class. Content gathering/ digital notebook Evernote http://evernote.com/ Set up account Use Evernote to take notes on all content collected via other tools Content synthesis Wikispaces http://www.wikispaces.com Post final project on personal page of class wiki The process and tools are overwhelming to students if presented all at once. As with any instructional design, the teacher determines the pace at which the students best assimilate each new learning tool. For this particular project, a new tool was introduced each day over two weeks. Once the construction process was complete, there were a number of personal web page aggregators that could have been selected to bring everything together in one place. Options at the time included iGoogle, PageFlakes, NetVibes, and Symbaloo. These sites offer a means to compile or pull together content from a variety of web applications. A web widget or gadget is a bit of code that is executed within the personal web page to pull up external content from other sites. The students in this case designed the personal web page using the gadgets needed in the format that best met their learning goals. Figure 3 is an instructor example of a personal webpage that includes the reader, email, personal it, note taking program, and social bookmarks on one page.
  • The personal learning environment can take the place of a traditional textbook, though does not preclude the student from using a textbook or accessing one or more numerous open source texts that may be available for the research topic. The goal is to access content from many sources to effectively meet the learning objectives. The next challenge is to determine whether those objectives have been met.
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  • AssessmentThere were four components of the assessment process for this test case of the Networked Student Model: (1) Ongoing performance assessment in the form of weekly assignments to facilitate the construction and maintenance of the personal learning environment, (2) rubric-based assessment of the personal learning environment at the end of the project, (3) written essay, and (4) multimedia synthesis of topic content. Points were earned for meeting the following requirements: Identify ten reliable it and post to social bookmarking account. At least three new it should be added each week. Subscribe and respond to at least 3 new its each week. Follow these its and news alerts using the reader. Subscribe to and listen to at least two podcasts (if available). Respectfully contact and request a video conference from a subject matter expert recognised in the field. Maintain daily notes and highlight it as needed in digital notebook. Post at least a one-paragraph reflection in personal it each day. At the end of the project, the personal learning environment was assessed with a rubric that encompassed each of the items listed above. The student's ability to synthesise the research was further evaluated with a reflective essay. Writing shapes thinking (Langer & Applebee, 1987), and the essay requirement was one more avenue through which the students demonstrated higher order learning. The personal it provided an opportunity for regular reflection during the course of the project. The essay was the culmination of the reflections along with a thoughtful synthesis of the learning experience. Students were instructed to articulate what was learned about the selected topic and why others should care or be concerned. The essay provided an overview of everything learned about the contemporary issue. it was well organised, detailed, and long enough to serve as a resource for others who wished to learn from the work. As part of a final exam, the students were required to access the final projects of their classmates and reflect on what they learned from this exposure. The purpose of this activity was to give the students an additional opportunity to share and learn from each other. Creativity is considered a key 21st century skill (Partnership for 21st Century Skills, 2009). A number of emerging web applications support the academic creative process. Students in this project used web tools to combine text, video, audio, and photographs to teach the research topics to others. The final multimedia project was posted or embedded on the student's personal wiki page. Analysis and assessment of student work was facilitated by the very technologies in use by the students. In order to follow their progress, the teacher simply subscribed to student social bookmarking accounts, readers, and its. Clicking through daily contributions was relatively quick and efficient.
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    Scholarly and important but also practical. Scroll down for an incredible chart of ideas that challenges older students to take charge of their own learning.
Amy Roediger

Reading Strategies for 'Informational Text' - NYTimes.com - 172 views

  • Four Corners and Anticipation Guides:Both of these techniques “activate schema” by asking students to react in some way to a series of controversial statements about a topic they are about to study. In Four Corners, students move around the room to show their degree of agreement or disagreement with various statements — about, for instance, the health risks of tanning, or the purpose of college, or dystopian teen literature. An anticipation guide does the same thing, though generally students simply react in writing to a list of statements on a handout. In this warm-up to a lesson on some of the controversies currently raging over school reform, students can use the statements we provide in either of these ways.
  • Gallery Walks:A rich way to build background on a topic at the beginning of a unit (or showcase learning at the end), Gallery Walks for this purpose are usually teacher-created collections of images, articles, maps, quotations, graphs and other written and visual texts that can immerse students in information about a broad subject. Students circulate through the gallery, reading, writing and talking about what they see.
  • Graphic Organizers:
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  • Making Text-to-Text/Text-to-Self/Text-to-World connectionsCharting Debatable IssuesListing Facts/Questions/ResponsesIdentifying Cause and EffectSupporting Opinions With FactsTracking The Five W’s and an HIdentifying Multiple Points of ViewIdentifying a Problem and SolutionComparing With a Venn Diagram
  • The One-Pager:Almost any student can find a “way in” with this strategy, which involves reacting to a text by creating one page that shows an illustration, question and quote that sum up some key aspect of what a student learned.
  • “Popcorn Reads”:Invite students to choose significant words, phrases or whole sentences from a text or texts to read aloud in random fashion, without explanation. Though this may sound pointless until you try it, it is an excellent way for students to “hear” some of the high points or themes of a text emerge, and has the added benefit of being an activity any reader can participate in easily.
  • Illustrations:Have students create illustrations for texts they’re reading, either in the margins as they go along, or after they’ve finished. The point of the exercise is not, of course, to create beautiful drawings, but to help them understand and retain the information they learn.
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    Update | Feb. 2012: We'll be exploring the new Common Core State Standards, and how teaching with The Times can address them, through a series of it posts. You can find them all here, tagged "the NYT and the CCSS."
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    A good list of reading strategies for informational text from the New York Times.
Maria José Vitorino

To Share or Not to Share: Is That the Question? (EDUCAUSE Review) | EDUCAUSE - 28 views

  • Open digital faculty do more than just share and participate in open it; they transfer their approaches to the teaching space. Learning becomes a shared activity in which the students also collaborate and participate in shaping the course activities. Student participation takes place in open environments where students might tweet what they learn, share insights on a group it, create their own website of it, or participate in a class wiki.
  • The difference is that today's sharing facilitators leverage technology to reach a much wider audience.
  • Although the natural inclination toward sharing cannot be altered, the moral responsibility to share can be influenced by the surrounding culture. The sense of obligation to share or not to share may be similar to the decision to be a vegetarian. For some, it is a lifestyle choice that may form slowly over a long period of time after many conversations with friends and colleagues. For others, the change can be sudden: a paradigm shift caused by participation in an unusual event. If an institution places value on faculty participation in open academic communities and social media activities (e.g., academic itging), that culture can slowly influence faculty to be more open.
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  • These digital activities should not be the sole measure of tenure, but they should be counted in the tenure formula. The irony today is that if the open activity is analog (e.g., participation on a committee), it likely counts toward tenure, but if the open activity is digital (e.g., writing an academic it), it probably does not.
  • They will push at (and leak out of) the boundaries of whatever learning management system (or other enterprise systems) the institution wants them to use. This is not because they are uncooperative; it's simply that these enterprise systems tend to be locked down, allowing only employees and students to share within these environments
  • For me, an interesting side effect of sharing on the open web is that I've learned to be more careful about what I say and write.
  • Looking for indicators of open digital faculty is easier than coming up with a strict definition. The presence of several of the following characteristics should be taken as an indication of open digital faculty: Writing a public it or maintaining a public wiki to share academic interests Freely sharing what might otherwise be guarded intellectual property (e.g., textbooks, research-in-progress, computer programs, course materials, artwork) Participating in a learning community in a social networking platform (e.g., Twitter or LinkedIn discussion groups) Participating in a social network that includes students, both current and past (e.g., Facebook) Encouraging students to participate in class-related projects that employ web-based media (e.g., student its, group wikis) Creating or participating in open courses Sharing video or audio content created for a course (e.g., podcasts) Sharing information and ideas from conference talks on the web (e.g., recordings, tweets, presentation links)
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    Open digital faculty do more than just share and participate in open it; they transfer their approaches to the teaching space. Learning becomes a shared activity in which the students also collaborate and participate in shaping the course activities. Student participation takes place in open environments where students might tweet what they learn, share insights on a group it, create their own website of it, or participate in a class wiki.
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    University context for open sources, sharingand digital trends era
Brad Belbas

update on Warner Music (UPDATED) (AGAIN) (Lessig Blog) - 0 views

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    This is a video of a talk that Lawrence Lessig (Professor, Stanford Law School) gave for an organization. In his talk, Lessig provides a powerful and piercing analysis and critique on the impact that legal restrictions on the re/use of media it has on creativity and cultural production. During his talk, Lessig shows some remarkably creative mash-ups videos on YouTube to exemplify the kind of creativity/cultural production that is possible through ubiquitous digital media. Ironically, the organization that hosted the talk received a notice from Warner Bros Music after posting a video of the Lessig's talk on YouTube, which, according to Lessig's it, "objected to its being posted on copyright grounds." Warner Brother Music Group has implemented content-id algorithms (i.e., technology that detects the digital "fingerprint" of corporate-"owned" copyrighted works) through media hosting services, including YouTube, FaceBook, and others. When the video of Lessig's talk was posted, it was 'dusted' for fingerprints of WBMG copyrighted works. The detection system identified the soundtracks in the YouTube videos Lessig showed, as materials to which they held copyright. Both the video of Lessig's talk and the it conversation regarding WBMG's objection are must-see it.
Sharin Tebo

4 Steps to Empower Student Voice | The Remind Blog - 39 views

  • The term “student voice” refers to the input and perspectives of students, and describes how their voices and actions affect what happens in the classroom. Through developing their own questions, seeking out their interests, and driving their own learning, students become more involved in their education. With this involvement comes empowerment, as students are able to use their knowledge to contribute to the greater community.
  • 1. Inclusion When students feel that they matter and are included in the classroom community, they are much more likely to open up and share their perspectives.
  • 2. Integration Begin to integrate student voice into your daily lessons by creating more opportunities for students to contribute. This can come in the form of whole classroom discussion, small group activities, input on writing activities, and more
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  • At the transformational level, teachers can draw on student input to shape curricular goals for the class.
  • Student empowerment enables students to use their knowledge to contribute to the classroom and greater outside community. When students feel comfortable sharing their voices, they grow into positions of leadership.
  • Resources Encourage student voice in your classroom and school communResourcesy wResourcesh some of these helpful Resources: Student Voice: Student Voice has toolkResources filled wResourcesh classroom Resources, student voice stories, and more that will allow you to transform your classroom into one where students can thrive. Edutopia: Check out some of these great articles and Resources for highlighting student voice in your classroom. Students at the Center: Motivation, engagement, and student voice activResourcesies. MindShift KQED: From student voices, learn what students say about being trusted partners in learning.
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    Voice and Choice--Encouraging it in 4 steps to personalize the learning experience.
Katt Blackwell-Starnes

using diigo with students - 564 views

I'm interested to see where this conversation goes next. There's some great information and pointers here. Thanks for the blog link, Andy. I'll be keeping up wblogh what you're wrbloging. In just ove...

diigo students bookmarking

Philip Pulley

Cool Cat Teacher Blog: A New Workflow for Me: Ipad, Keyboard, iPhone - 1 views

    • Philip Pulley
       
      Using Splashtop streamer at school, it both computer (laptop) and iPad are on the same wireless network you can control the computer from your iPad. If a hard wired internet connection on a desktop you can access it though your Google account.
  • I finished this post on my PC in the office because the Zemanta plug in
    • Philip Pulley
       
      A blogging tag tool, I need to check blog out down the road when I am blogging more.
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  • and used the PowerTeacher
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    Blog wBlogh resource information for iPad, iPhone and iPad keyboard.
oconnortammy

Education World: Are You a Techno-Constructivist? - 33 views

  • not only complements instruction but redefines it.
    • missboess
       
      This statement encompasses what I am trying to achieve in this resource design assessment. It also clearly links to the SMAR model of best ICT use in education, by implementing learning experience wIth technology that 'redefines' the activIty. Meaning the activIty is something that could not be done wIthout the technology used.
  • help children build on their own experiences, construct their own meanings, create products, and solve problems successfully.
    • missboess
       
      Encompasses the constructivist theory I am using in the resource design and furthermore links to the method of inquiry.
  • long-term problem-solving and product-generating tasks
    • missboess
       
      In my resource design students will take part in a long term water sustainability project. A website will assist them in attaining access to multiple it, communication with the outerworld (itging) and creating products such as videos, visuals etc.
    • oconnortammy
       
      How are you helping your students to connect to the outside world? Are they having dialogues with others?
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  • See The Webquest Page or WebQuest.org for endless materials.)
    • missboess
       
      Webquest was used as an inspiration for my resource design, as it provides a useful platform for inquiry units to be created. There are endless examples on there. I really recommend you have a look at them. I decided to create my own website on weebly, as it provided more options and interactivity.
Darren Jones

HELP. Trying to figure out how to use Diigo in my class. - 54 views

Hi Joshua, I think it's because my sticky note was private. For some reason my Diigolet wouldn't let me add a public one, but if you are able to make your one public that should do it. Hopefully!

Help post it classroom blog open resources

Maria Nuzzo

Three Elements of Great Communication, According to Aristotle - Scott Edinger - Harvard Business Review - 99 views

  • Three Elements of Great Communication, According to Aristotle by Scott Edinger  |   9:00 AM January 17, 2013 Comments (78)         In my nearly 20 years of work in organization development, I've never heard anyone say that a leader communicated too much or too well. On the contrary, the most common improvement suggestion I've seen offered up on the thousands of 360 evaluations I've reviewed over the years is that it would be better if the subject in question learned to communicate more effectively. What makes someone a good communicator? There's no mystery here, not since Aristotle identified the three critical elements — ethos, pathos, and logos. — thousands of years ago. Ethos is essentially your credibility — that is, the reason people should believe what you're saying. In writing this it I made an effort to demonstrate my ethos in the introduction, and here I'll just add that I have a degree in communication studies (emphasis in rhetoric for those who want the details) for good measure. In some cases, ethos comes merely from your rank within an organization. More commonly, though, today's leaders build ethos most
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    Three aspects of communication as outlined by Aristotle.
Warren Apel

5 Resources for Parent-Teacher Conferences - 50 views

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    For many educators, conferences are coming up soon, and it can be a stressful time of the school year. To help parents and educators prepare for parent-teacher conferences, we've rounded up a variety of web it. From ideas for highlighting student progress, to questions every parent should ask, these are some of our favorite articles and it that cover parent-teacher conferencing.
Brian Peoples

Book In An Hour: A Classroom Strategy « Not All Who Wonder Are Lost - 8 views

  • « Thoughts on Collaboration and Developing Higher Level Questioning Skills Twittering with a Purpose: A Starter (or Restarter) Guide » Book In An Hour: A Classroom Strategy April 30, 2009 by Ellsbeth This past winter I had the opportunity to attend a workshop with Organization of American Historians distinguished lecturer, Dr. Lendol Calder.   This is the first place where I came across the strategy called Book In An Hour.  Since then I’ve tried to find additional internet it on this strategy, but they appear to be few and far between.  I know other people would find it useful, so I decided to write up the strategy and post it here on the it.  If you know of additional it or ways to adapt this strategy, I would enjoy hearing from you. What: The Book In An Hour strategy is a jigsaw activity for chapter books.  While the strategy can take more than an hour depending on the reading and presentation method you choose. Why: While many teachers view this activity as a time saver, I view it as a way to expose students to more literary and historical materials than I might have been able to do otherwise.  There are many books that I would love my students to read, but I know that being able to do so is not always my reality.  This st
  • y gives me an avenue to expose them to additional literature and other important historical works without taking much time away from the other aspects of my courses.  it also provides opportunities for differentiation.  This strategy can be adapted to introduce a book that students will be reading in-depth.  Instead of j
  • ng to divide students up into groups or jigsaw with individual students.  If you are using groups, I recommend making them heterogeneous or creating them in a way that subtly facilitates differentiation.  I also encourage you to give each student in the grou
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    suggested on #sschat
smilex3md

Bill Gates wants your kids to learn history this way - and he's paying to get it into schools - The Washington Post - 82 views

  • Gates told the Times article’s author, Andrew Ross Sorkin, that after he watched it:  “I just loved it. it was very clarifying for me. I thought, ‘God, everybody should watch this thing!’”
  • And there you have it. Bill Gates likes something; Bill Gates pays to get it into schools. it may be a good idea. it may be a bad idea. it doesn’t matter, because Gates has the money and clout to inject it into wherever he wants to inject it.
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    Don't dismiss Big History Project! The article, given another angle, could have illuminated the team behind the project, the teachers in the project, and the quality of the it. Do give it a look.
James Shockley

Web 2.0 Smack Down - 149 views

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    Digital Edition mag Top Stories Benjamin Franklin: An Extraordinary United States Global Change Research National World War II Museum Mayan Math Activity Product Review: StudySync FORUMS How did you choose an SIS? Are schools ready for open source? Can you Google-proof a question using Bloom's Taxonomy? Does online training work? top tech it LCD or DLP? More.. Subscribe| Customer Service|Contact Us|About Us|eNewsletters|Advertising New Articles From the Classroom Leadership Professional Development Tech/Media Coordinators Tech Talk Studies in Ed Tech Ideas and Opinions How To EdTech Ticker TL Advisor it Leader of the Year Awards of Excellence Portraits of Learning Other Contests Upcoming Webinars Data Management Security eLearning Copyright Funding Mobile & Wireless Assessment & Testing Curriculum News & Trends Products Features Editor's Desk Issues Current Issue Newsletters eBooks White Papers Grants Columns Podcasts Web Tours Buyers Guide News Site of the Day QuickFlicks it Guy Interactive Whiteboards Student Information Systems
Maggie Tsai

Diigo: Why I use it. « Rhondda's Reflections - wandering around the Web - 0 views

  • So why do I use Diigo?   I like its ability to enhance my bookmarking with highlights and sticky notes, that are retained with the page when I go back to it. I like that you can highlight and publish easily from Diigo to you it or an email, and a reference appears automatically along with the posting. I like the ability to create lists on specific topics that can be shared. I like the ability to create groups to pool it for specific subjects. I recently joined a few Diigo groups and have had some very useful sites brought to my attention. I like that you can access and search the bookmarks anywhere by full-text and tags. I like to search for the most popular bookmarks on a particular subject. I like the different ways to share and aggregate information that  Diigo offers. I have set it up so that a list of my new bookmarks appears on this it on a weekly basis but this is just one option. You can now choose to automatically The tool bar is easy to download and makes it easy to use and aspect of Diigo whenever you are on line.
  • Of course you can keep things private if you choose to but that is really defeating the purpose of Diigo in the first place. Diigo also began offering, on Sept 19th, a Diigo Education Account Facility. I haven’t investigated this yet but a post about it was put onto the SLAV Bright Ideas it. it is worth looking at. From Diigo ‘The Diigo Educator Accounts offer a suite of features that makes it incredibly easy for teachers to get their entire class of students or their peers started on collaborative research using Diigo’s powerful web annotation and social bookmarking technology.’ For an educator account, you do have to apply and fill out how/why you want to use Diigo in your school.
Randolph Hollingsworth

Call for Submissions - US Dept of Labor Employment and Training Administration - 27 views

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    See also statement by Labor Dept (http://www.dol.gov/opa/media/press/eta/eta20101436.htm) and White House (http://www.whitehouse.gov/it/2011/01/20/new-job-training-and-education-grants-program-launched) and Chronicle article at http://chronicle.com/its/wiredcampus/2-billion-federal-program-could-be-windfall-for-open-online-learning/29167 $2-Billion Federal Program Could Be 'Windfall' for Open Online Learning January 22, 2011, 9:49 am By Marc Parry "The Obama administration is encouraging the development of high-quality immersive online-learning environments. it suggests courses with simulations, with constant feedback, and with interactive software that can tailor instruction and tutoring to individual students. it likes courses that students can use to teach themselves. And it demands open access to everything: "All online and technology-enabled courses must permit free public use and distribution, including the ability to re-use course modules, via an online repository for learning materials to be established by the federal government.... That's because the government is requiring that all work supported by the grants be made available under what's known as a "Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License," which Mr. Green described as 'one of the most open content licenses that exists.'"
Roland Gesthuizen

Resources for Project-Based Learning - 191 views

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    Project-based learning, or PBL, grew out of early 20th century education reform, like the works of John Dewey. It generally involves directed, open-ended questions, real-life problem solving, and presentation to an authentic audience. .. We're really looking forward to hearing how you use PBL and the Projects feature in your classrooms. We're so excIted, in fact, that we rounded up a few It from around the web to help you out:
Mark Barnes

Learn It In 5 - Scoop.It - 11 views

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    Teachers, students can create online magazine with Scoop.it The magazine creation web site, Scoop.it, allows teachers and students to easily become curators of information on a variety of topics. Name your topic, decide where you want Scoop.it to look for content -- Twitter, Google+, YouTube and others -- and Scoop.it does the rest.
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    Also need to include a more extensive concept of digital curation - the idea of adding value by your comments and evaluation of recommended it, not just collecting a whole bunch of stuff. There are a whole bunch of its e.g. http://d20innovation.d20its.org/2012/07/07/understanding-content-curation/ and scoop.it pages on this topic e.g. http://www.scoop.it/t/digital-curation-for-teachers
Jonathan Wylie

The Best Education Blogs for Teachers Who Love Technology - 132 views

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    Teachers love to share their best ideas and resources wresourcesh others. In the past, this was done by word of mouth, but today they resources about resources.
Rod White

Teaching and technology ~ presentations and resources for educators - 77 views

  • During the last six or so years I have created a number of 'how-to' documents and presentations for a variety of web based and related technologies. They are available from the various workshop web pages however I thought it might prove helpful to link to all the documents from a single page. Some of my workshop participants have referred to these documents as 'cheat sheets'.
  • ~ www.larkin.net.au ~ | Welcome | About Me | Technology | History | Galleries | Music | Blog | Presentation and workshop documents During the last six or so years I have created a number of 'how-to' documents and presentations for a variety of web based and related technologies. They are available from the various workshop web pages however I thought Blog might prove helpful to link to all the documents from a single page. Some of my workshop participants have referred to these documents as 'cheat sheets'. Web 2.0Read~WrBloge Web Overview Information sharing
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    great clearinghouse of tutorials & handouts from presentations on many tools
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    online workshops
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