Skip to main content

Home/ Diigo In Education/ Group items matching ""world war ii" war" in title, tags, annotations or url

Group items matching
in title, tags, annotations or url

Sort By: Relevance | Date Filter: All | Bookmarks | Topics Simple Middle
Michael Sheehan

Learning Never Stops: 30,000 World War II Pictures, the Inauguration, and Diagrams - 4 views

  •  
    Over 30,000 World War II photographs, plus create diagrams and a funny take on the Inauguration.
Michael Sheehan

Learning Never Stops: World War II Posters and the Statue of Liberty - 4 views

  •  
    Digital copies of World War II poster that can be downloaded and printed! Plus, an excellent photo blog about the Statue of Liberty.
Michael Sheehan

12 Terrific World War II resources you may not have seen - 8 views

  •  
    Explore the triumphs and tragedy of WWII with these 12 websites.
Michael Sheehan

Learning Never Stops: Vintage Propaganda Posters- Two Great Resources - 115 views

  •  
    World War II and Cold War.
Karen Bradley

Population Control, Marauder Style - NYTimes.com - 73 views

  •  
    Compare death rates from Mideast slave trade, Famines in British India, World Wars I and II, Genghis Khan, Mao Zedong, Atlantic slave trade . . . at the bottom of the graphic there's a table translating figures into % of world population at the time they occurred. Astounding!
James Shockley

Web 2.0 Smack Down - 149 views

  •  
    Digital Edition mag Top Stories Benjamin Franklin: An Extraordinary United States Global Change Research National World War II Museum Mayan Math Activity Product Review: StudySync FORUMS How did you choose an SIS? Are schools ready for open source? Can you Google-proof a question using Bloom's Taxonomy? Does online training work? top tech resources LCD or DLP? More.. Subscribe| Customer Service|Contact Us|About Us|eNewsletters|Advertising New Articles From the Classroom Leadership Professional Development Tech/Media Coordinators Tech Talk Studies in Ed Tech Ideas and Opinions How To EdTech Ticker TL Advisor Blog Leader of the Year A World War II ds of Excellence Portraits of Learning Other Contests Upcoming Webinars Data Management Security eLearning Copyright Funding Mobile & Wireless Assessment & Testing Curriculum News & Trends Products Features Editor's Desk Issues Current Issue Newsletters eBooks White Papers Grants Columns Podcasts Web Tours Buyers Guide News Site of the Day QuickFlicks IT Guy Interactive Whiteboards Student Information Systems
drmaddin

Western culture after World War II | myHistro - 10 views

    • drmaddin
       
      This is a great storytelling tool for social studies.
  •  
    This is an example of a digital story created in myHistro.  What a cool way to capture a period of time for a project in social studies.
Allison Hilburn

About the Great Depression - 48 views

    • Allison Hilburn
       
      I think we should use this site to answer the question about...
  • , and by early 1932 it had reached 6 million workers, or 25 percent of the work force. Britain was less severely affected, but its industrial and export sectors remained seriously depressed until World War II. Many other countries had been affected by the slump by 1931.
Michael Sheehan

Learning Never Stops: Explore Anne Frank's hiding place - 6 views

  •  
    A virtual tour of the secret annex where Anne Frank and her family hid from the Nazis.
Candy Boyer

Tom Wolfe, Author and Satirist of America, Dies at 88 | Time - 4 views

  • American maverick who insisted that the only way to tell a great story was to go out and report it.
  • journalism could offer the kinds of literary pleasure found in books.
  • Wolfe scorned the reluctance of American writers to confront social issues and warned that self-absorption and master’s programs would kill the novel. “So the doors close and the walls go up!” he wrote in his 1989 literary manifesto, “Stalking the Billion-Footed Beast.” He was astonished that no author of his generation had written a sweeping, 19th century style novel about contemporary New York City, and ended up writing one himself, “The Bonfire of the Vanities.”
  • ...9 more annotations...
  • “My contention is that status is on everybody’s mind all of the time, whether they’re conscious of it or not,”
  • “new journalism” combined the emotional impact of a novel, the analysis of the best essays, and the factual foundation of hard reporting. He mingled it all in an over-the-top style that made life itself seem like one spectacular headline.
  • pointed look at fund-raising for the Black Panther Party by Leonard Bernstein and other wealthy whites.
  • And no one more memorably captured the beauty-and-the-beast divide between the Beatles and the Rolling Stones: “The Beatles want to hold your hand,” he wrote, “but the Rolling Stones want to burn down your town!”
  • s a child, he did rewrites of the Authurian legends and penned biographies of his heroes.
  • unsuccessful pitching tryout with the New York Giants before
  • The Washington Post, where he won Washington Newspaper Guild awards in 1960 for his coverage of U.S.-Cuban affairs and a satiric account of that year’s Senate civil rights filibuster.
  • The next year, Wolfe was assigned to cover a “Hot Rod & Custom Car” show. He completed a story, the kind “any of the somnambulistic totem newspapers in America would have come up with.” But he knew there was a much richer, and longer story to tell, one about a thriving subculture that captured the post-World War II economic boom and the new freedom to “build monuments” to one’s own style. No newspaper could contain what Wolfe had in mind, so he turned to Esquire magazine, wrote up 49 pages and helped give birth to a new kind of reporter. “For the who-what-where-when-why of traditional journalism, he has substituted what he calls ‘the wowie!'” according to a 1965 Newsweek story.
  • “A Man in Full” turned Wolfe’s smirk to Atlanta society. His 2004 novel, “I Am Charlotte Simmons,” looked at life on a fictional elite college campus rife with drinking, status obsession and sex.
  •  
    includes short VIDEO "Wolfe scorned the reluctance of American writers to confront social issues and warned that self-absorption and master's programs would kill the novel."
1 - 15 of 15
Showing 20 items per page