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Martin Burrett

CoSpaces - 38 views

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    "A superb platform for creating 3D virtual reality environments to view on your mobile device. Choose from the bank of 3D virtual reality or upload/search for your own. You can create sequential scenes like a presentation which is great for story writing or even teaching. Create virtual museums or even a digital class display of pupil's work to share with parents."
Michele Brown

The National Networker (TNNW) Blog: BEYOND THE CUBICLE - CORPORATE CULTURE: Tweeple, Twibes and Tweets…the culture of virtual communities - 9 views

  • The culture appears to be grounded in not only a need to share, but also a desire to be recognized. Retweets – when someone sends your tweet (message) out to their followers (a term supporting the need for recognition) somehow elevates your status within this community.
  • Social Media as a dominant force for communicating has penetrated every element of society. Can a virtual community possess a culture? Every company and organization possesses a definable culture. Behaviors, decision-making models, intrinsic and extrinsic actions and how people are treated may all play a part in defining it. These elements of culture are measureable and easy to define within a controlled entity. Social media lives and breathes in a virtual reality. It permeates all corners of the world, allows people to communicate across all traditional boundaries and thrives 24 hours/day. So…does it have a definable culture? If you have spent any time on Twitter, you quickly realize thousands of people have a need to respond to the question, “What’s happening?” Twitter has developed it’s own language with tweets, retweets, tweeple, twitpics, twibes, etc. You can follow topics with a hashtag and people with lists. What is most apparent is the need people have to share. The culture appears to be grounded in not only a need to share, but also a desire to be recognized. Retweets – when someone sends your tweet (message) out to their followers (a term supporting the need for recognition) somehow elevates your status within this community. There are etiquette protocols as many people publicly thank you for following them and for retweeting. Retweeting becomes a type
  • As you get deeper into the structure of Twitter, you can join a twibe or tweeple group, which provides inclusion – another indication that the need for recognition is systemic.
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  • Social media lives and breathes in a virtual reality. It permeates all corners of the world, allows people to communicate across all traditional boundaries and thrives 24 hours/day. So…does it have a definable culture?
  • The culture appears to be grounded in not only a need to share, but also a desire to be recognized. Retweets – when someone sends your tweet (message) out to their followers (a term supporting the need for recognition) somehow elevates your status within this community.
Elena Gamova

Adaptive Learning Systems - 18 views

  • Educational software and systems are not easily usable for many learners and educators, and for that matter present obstacles for educational institutions.
  • The necessary business models and key transactions that enable the missions of knowledge-driven institutions are not yet adapted to computers and distributed systems. Equally problematic: educational networks do not yet offer sufficiently high reliability to become a viable alternative to many educational media, such as desktop systems or traditional classroom techniques.
  • In the current environment, end users will have to wait some time yet until many technological advances such as virtual reality and distributed simulation become preferred tools among trainers and educators.
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  • The program emphasizes comprehensive infrastructure solutions that are both flexible and scalable with respect to all fundamental aspects of information network-based instruction. Four key research areas are:
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