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Martin Burrett

CoSpaces - 38 views

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    "A superb platform for creating 3D virtual reality environments to view on your mobile device. Choose from the bank of 3D models or upload/search for your own. You can create sequential scenes like a presentation which is great for story writing or even teaching. Create virtual museums or even a digital class display of pupil's work to share with parents."
Nigel Coutts

Virtual Reality - 46 views

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    What are the possibilities for situated learning created by a growing number of Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality Devices from Oculus Rift, Samsung, Google and Microsoft?
Martin Burrett

Membit - 36 views

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    "Amazing augmented reality map-based app where users pin images to specific geo-locations for others to discover. Upload photos, clues for a virtually trail, or virtually displaying work around your school. Default set to share to contacts only for pupils to use safely, but teachers can share publicly."
Martin Burrett

WallaMe - 15 views

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    "An interesting iOS and Android app where users can create virtual messages in a particular geo-location for others to find, and then share with others. Perfect for virtual treasure hunts and much more."
Martin Burrett

Cardboard Camera - 22 views

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    "Google has pioneered virtual reality for the masses and has now developed an app to allow users to capture their own VR photo scenes. Transport your pupils to anywhere!"
Michele Brown

The National Networker (TNNW) Blog: BEYOND THE CUBICLE - CORPORATE CULTURE: Tweeple, Twibes and Tweets…the culture of virtual communities - 9 views

  • The culture appears to be grounded in not only a need to share, but also a desire to be recognized. Retweets – when someone sends your tweet (message) out to their followers (a term supporting the need for recognition) somehow elevates your status within this community.
  • Social Media as a dominant force for communicating has penetrated every element of society. Can a virtual community possess a culture? Every company and organization possesses a definable culture. Behaviors, decision-making models, intrinsic and extrinsic actions and how people are treated may all play a part in defining it. These elements of culture are measureable and easy to define within a controlled entity. Social media lives and breathes in a virtual reality. It permeates all corners of the world, allows people to communicate across all traditional boundaries and thrives 24 hours/day. So…does it have a definable culture? If you have spent any time on Twitter, you quickly realize thousands of people have a need to respond to the question, “What’s happening?” Twitter has developed it’s own language with tweets, retweets, tweeple, twitpics, twibes, etc. You can follow topics with a hashtag and people with lists. What is most apparent is the need people have to share. The culture appears to be grounded in not only a need to share, but also a desire to be recognized. Retweets – when someone sends your tweet (message) out to their followers (a term supporting the need for recognition) somehow elevates your status within this community. There are etiquette protocols as many people publicly thank you for following them and for retweeting. Retweeting becomes a type
  • As you get deeper into the structure of Twitter, you can join a twibe or tweeple group, which provides inclusion – another indication that the need for recognition is systemic.
  • ...2 more annotations...
  • Social media lives and breathes in a virtual reality. It permeates all corners of the world, allows people to communicate across all traditional boundaries and thrives 24 hours/day. So…does it have a definable culture?
  • The culture appears to be grounded in not only a need to share, but also a desire to be recognized. Retweets – when someone sends your tweet (message) out to their followers (a term supporting the need for recognition) somehow elevates your status within this community.
Martin Burrett

EcoBugs - iPhone game - 21 views

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    Think your school is clean? It could be crawling with virtual bug which your children have to find and identify with Augmented Reality. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/ICT+&+Web+Tools
Martin Burrett

Masquerade - 12 views

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    "This app adds augmented reality mask layers to videos allowing users to wear virtual costumes or masks. Great for character acting or allowing shy students to appear on camera as someone or something else."
Randy Yerrick

Michael Bodekaer: This virtual lab will revolutionize science class | TED Talk | TED.com - 22 views

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    Virtual reality is no longer part of some distant future, and it's not just for gaming and entertainment anymore. Michael Bodekaer wants to use it to make quality education more accessible. In this refreshing talk, he demos an idea that could revolutionize the way we teach science in schools.
Josephine Dorado

About Immersive Education | Immersive Education Initiative - 44 views

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    Immersive Education, a Media Grid initiative, is an award-winning learning platform that combines interactive 3D graphics, commercial game and simulation technology, virtual reality, voice chat, Web cameras (webcams) and rich digital media with collaborative online course environments and classrooms.
anonymous

Horizon Report 2013 - 3 views

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    The NMC is pleased to announce the interim results of the 2013 Horizon.K12 Project, as presented at the 2013 CoSN Conference in San Diego. The Horizon Project Advisory Board voted for the top 12 emerging technologies as well as the top ten trends and challenges that they believe will have a significant impact on teaching, learning, and creative inquiry in global K-12 education over the next five years. These initial results will be compiled into an interim report, known as the "Short List," and described in further detail. The "Time-to-Adoption Horizon" indicates how long the Advisory Board feels it will be until a significant number of schools are providing or using each of these technologies or approaches broadly. Near-Term Horizon: One Year or Less * BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) * Cloud Computing * Mobile Learning * Online Learning Mid-Term Horizon: Two to Three Years * Adaptive Learning and Personal Learning Networks * Electronic Publishing * Learning Analytics * Open Content Long-Term Horizon: Four to Five Years * 3D Printing * Augmented Reality * Virtual and Remote Laboratories * Wearable Technology
Marc Patton

VREP - 42 views

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    The Virtual Reality Education Pathfinder (VREP) is an educational initiative and partnership between government, education, and industry creating an ever-growing consortium of schools and businesses committed to bringing a new kind of learning and teaching to schools across the country.
Martha Hickson

Google Art Project - 1 views

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    The Art Project is a collaboration between Google and 151 acclaimed art partners from across 40 countries. Using a combination of various Google technologies and expert information provided by our museum partners, we have created a unique online art experience. Users can explore a wide range of artworks at brushstroke level detail, take a virtual tour of a museum and even build their own collections to share. With a team of Googlers working across many product areas we are able to harness the best of Google to power the Art Project experience. Few people will ever be lucky enough to be able to visit every museum or see every work of art they're interested in but now many more can enjoy over 30 000 works of art from sculpture to architecture and drawings and explore over 150 collections from 40 countries, all in one place. We're also lucky at Google to have the technology to make this kind of project a reality.
Martin Burrett

Teachers make all the difference - including in virtual reality teaching - 13 views

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    "In a few years from now, students in schools all over the world will receive part of their education in virtual learning environments. Wearing VR-goggles the students will be able to enter 3-dimensional, simulated places and situations that they would normally not have access to because it would be too expensive, too dangerous or physically impossible. Teaching via VR-technology is spreading widely and international studies predict that this will revolutionise the way we learn."
Paul Allison

Why playing in the virtual world has an awful lot to teach children | Technology | The Observer - 29 views

  • If we are to understand the 21st century and the generation who will inherit it, it's crucial that we learn to describe the dynamics of this gaming life: a place that's not so much about escaping the commitments and interactions that make friendships "real" as about a sophisticated set of satisfactions with their own increasingly urgent reality and challenges.
    • Paul Allison
       
      This is pretty easy to say, and I'm helping to create a NYC Writing Project group to look experiment with games and to study how to bring them into our curriculum. So much of it is theory! And sometimes it feels like another pressure point urging us to do this or do that in the classroom.
anonymous

Virtual Communities and Embodied Realities: "he was SPYING ON ME....do they see nothing wrong with this?" - 8 views

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    The fate of privacy in the 2.0 world: students spying on students.
anonymous

Virtual Communities and Embodied Realities: Public Displays, Before and After the End of Don't Ask Don't Tell - 24 views

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    What's the future of privacy in the Web 2.0 world? Community? Protest? Reflections on the aftermath of Tyler Clementi's suicide and the end of Don't Ask Don' Tell
anonymous

Social Networking as a Tool for Student and Teacher Learning - 52 views

  • Online social networking includes much more than Facebook and Twitter. It is any online use of technology to connect people, enable them to collaborate with each other, and form virtual communities, says the Young Adult Library Services Association
  • Among students surveyed in a National School Boards Association study, 96 percent of those with online access reported using social networking, and half said they use it to discuss schoolwork. Despite this prevalence in everyday life, schools have been hesitant to adopt social networking as an education tool. A 2010 study into principals’ attitudes found that “schools are one of the last holdouts,” with many banning the most popular social networking sites for students and sometimes for staff.
  • Survey research confirms, however, that interest in harnessing social networking for educational purposes is high. As reported in School Principals and Social Networking in Education: Practices, Policies and Realities in 2010, a national survey of 1,200 principals, teachers and librarians found that most agreed that social networking sites can help educators share information and resources, create professional learning communities and improve schoolwide communications with students and staff. Those who had used social networks were more positive about potential benefits than those who had not. In an online discussion with 12 of the principals surveyed, most said, “social networking and online collaboration tools would make a substantive change in students’ educational experience.” They said these tools could improve student motivation and engagement, help students develop a more social/collaborative view of learning and create a connection to real-life learning.
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  • Most national, state and local policies have not yet addressed social networking specifically; by default, it often falls under existing acceptable use policies (AUPs). While AUPs usually provide clear language on obscenities, profanity and objectionable activities, they also leave out gray areas that could open students to harmful activities while excluding them from certain benefits of social networking. Likewise, boilerplate policies that ban specific applications, such as Twitter, may miss other potential threats while also limiting the ability of students to collaborate across schools, districts, states or countries. The challenge for districts is to write policies that address potentially harmful interactions without eliminating the technology’s beneficial uses.
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