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Derrick C

Science Experiments Elementary - 61 views

  • Cooling Soda Cans
    • Derrick C
       
      science method chemistry hypothesis predictions observations data collection recording
  • Flowers In Water
    • Derrick C
       
      biology all scientific method steps application focus?
  • Frozen Candles
    • Derrick C
       
      highlight: hypothesis, prediction, observations, data collection, data recording
  • ...3 more annotations...
  • Make a Battery From Fruit
    • Derrick C
       
      chemistry scientific method observation prediction hypothesis
  • Moth Balls Dance
    • Derrick C
       
      chemistry scientific method observations hypothesis application
  • Sense of Smell
    • Derrick C
       
      making observations asking questions
Robert Parker

Andragogy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - 35 views

  • Andragogy consists of learning strategies focused on adults. It is often interpreted as the process of engaging adult learners with the structure of learning experience. The term ‘andragogy’ has been used in different times and countries with various connotations
  • Knowles asserted that andragogy (Greek: "man-leading") should be distinguished from the more commonly used pedagogy (Greek: "child-leading"). Knowles' theory can be stated with six assumptions related to motivation of adult learning:[1][2] Adults need to know the reason for learning something (Need to Know) Experience (including error) provides the basis for learning activities (Foundation). Adults need to be responsible for their decisions on education; involvement in the planning and evaluation of their instruction (Self-concept). Adults are most interested in learning subjects having immediate relevance to their work and/or personal lives (Readiness). Adult learning is problem-centered rather than content-oriented (Orientation). Adults respond better to internal versus external motivators (Motivation). The term has been used by some to allow discussion of contrast between self-directed and 'taught' education
    • Tammy Sanders
       
      Andragogy - man-leading as in leading man Pedagogy - child-leading as in leading children
    • Robert Parker
       
      I like this term, it reflects much of waht happens in higher education as the springboard for life-long learning
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    Andragogy From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Andragogy consists of learning strategies focused on adults. It is often interpreted as the process of engaging adult learners with the structure of learning experience. The term 'andragogy' has been used in different times and countries with various connotations. Nowadays there exist mainly three understandings: 1. In many countries there is a growing conception of 'andragogy' as the scholarly approach to the learning of adults. In this connotation andragogy is the science of understanding (= theory) and supporting (= practice) lifelong and lifewide education of adults. 2. Especially in the USA, 'andragogy' in the tradition of Malcolm Knowles, labels a specific theoretical and practical approach, based on a humanistic conception of self-directed and autonomous learners and teachers as facilitators of learning. 3. Widely, an unclear use of andragogy can be found, with its meaning changing (even in the same publication) from 'adult education practice' or 'desirable values' or 'specific teaching methods,' to 'reflections' or 'academic discipline' and/or 'opposite to childish pedagogy', claiming to be 'something better' than just 'Adult Education'. The oldest document using the term "Andragogik": Kapp, Alexander (1833): Platon's Erziehungslehre, als Pädagogik für die Einzelnen und als Staatspädagogik. Leipzig. Originally used by Alexander Kapp (a German educator) in 1833, andragogy was developed into a theory of adult education by the American educator Malcolm Knowles. Knowles asserted that andragogy (Greek: "man-leading") should be distinguished from the more commonly used pedagogy (Greek: "child-leading"). Knowles' theory can be stated with six assumptions related to motivation of adult learning:[1][2] Adults need to know the reason for learning something (Need to Know) Experience (including error) provides the basis for learning activities (Foundation). Adults need to be
  • ...2 more comments...
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    Really not seeing the difference in how children and adults learn here. I have heard the term first about 20 or more years ago. From this definition the principals behind it are no different from those behind what a good learning environment is for all ages. What changes is the content not that the student, regardless of age, leads in their own learning facilitated by a trained practitioner.
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    "Andragogy" is another sexist term, using "andro" = male to stand for all humanity. Why wouldn't it by called "Gynogogy"? Can't we use a different term? Bring the concept up-do-date from 1833?
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    Andragogy From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Andragogy consists of learning strategies focused on adults. It is often interpreted as the process of engaging adult learners with the structure of learning experience. The term 'andragogy' has been used in different times and countries with various connotations. Nowadays there exist mainly three understandings: 1. In many countries there is a growing conception of 'andragogy' as the scholarly approach to the learning of adults. In this connotation andragogy is the science of understanding (= theory) and supporting (= practice) lifelong and lifewide education of adults. 2. Especially in the USA, 'andragogy' in the tradition of Malcolm Knowles, labels a specific theoretical and practical approach, based on a humanistic conception of self-directed and autonomous learners and teachers as facilitators of learning. 3. Widely, an unclear use of andragogy can be found, with its meaning changing (even in the same publication) from 'adult education practice' or 'desirable values' or 'specific teaching methods,' to 'reflections' or 'academic discipline' and/or 'opposite to childish pedagogy', claiming to be 'something better' than just 'Adult Education'. The oldest document using the term "Andragogik": Kapp, Alexander (1833): Platon's Erziehungslehre, als Pädagogik für die Einzelnen und als Staatspädagogik. Leipzig. Originally used by Alexander Kapp (a German educator) in 1833, andragogy was developed into a theory of adult education by the American educator Malcolm Knowles. Knowles asserted that andragogy (Greek: "man-leading") should be distinguished from the more commonly used pedagogy (Greek: "child-leading"). Knowles' theory can be stated with six assumptions related to motivation of adult learning:[1][2] Adults need to know the reason for learning something (Need to Know) Experience (including error) provides the basis for learning activities (Foundation). Adults need to be
  •  
    Andragogy From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Andragogy consists of learning strategies focused on adults. It is often interpreted as the process of engaging adult learners with the structure of learning experience. The term 'andragogy' has been used in different times and countries with various connotations. Nowadays there exist mainly three understandings: 1. In many countries there is a growing conception of 'andragogy' as the scholarly approach to the learning of adults. In this connotation andragogy is the science of understanding (= theory) and supporting (= practice) lifelong and lifewide education of adults. 2. Especially in the USA, 'andragogy' in the tradition of Malcolm Knowles, labels a specific theoretical and practical approach, based on a humanistic conception of self-directed and autonomous learners and teachers as facilitators of learning. 3. Widely, an unclear use of andragogy can be found, with its meaning changing (even in the same publication) from 'adult education practice' or 'desirable values' or 'specific teaching methods,' to 'reflections' or 'academic discipline' and/or 'opposite to childish pedagogy', claiming to be 'something better' than just 'Adult Education'. The oldest document using the term "Andragogik": Kapp, Alexander (1833): Platon's Erziehungslehre, als Pädagogik für die Einzelnen und als Staatspädagogik. Leipzig. Originally used by Alexander Kapp (a German educator) in 1833, andragogy was developed into a theory of adult education by the American educator Malcolm Knowles. Knowles asserted that andragogy (Greek: "man-leading") should be distinguished from the more commonly used pedagogy (Greek: "child-leading"). Knowles' theory can be stated with six assumptions related to motivation of adult learning:[1][2] Adults need to know the reason for learning something (Need to Know) Experience (including error) provides the basis for learning activities (Foundation). Adults need to be
fishy65

BBC - Radio 4 - So You Want To Be A Scientist? - The Experiments - Homing Snails Experiment - Snail Swapping Instructions - 37 views

  •  
    Take part in some real science. The question was asked by a young girl, "Do snails have a homing instinct" and it turns out no one really know. So BBC Radio 4 is asking people to help find out by getting involved and conducting the experiment. What a great opportunity for young science students.
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    Take part in some real science. The question was asked by a young girl, "Do snails have a homing instinct" and it turns out no one really know. So BBC Radio 4 is asking people to help find out by getting involved and conducting the experiment. What a great opportunity for young science students.
Steve Kelly

What would an exceptional middle and high school computer science curriculum include? - Quora - 48 views

  • What would an exceptional middle and high school computer science curriculum include?
  • This isn't a complete answer, but one thing the very first introductory classes should require is that the students turn off all their electronic computers and actually learn to walk through  algorithms with a computer that exists only on paper. (Or, I suppose, a whiteboard or a simulator.) This exercise would give the students a grounding in what is going on inside the computer as a very low level.My first computer programming class in my Freshman year of high school was completely on paper. Although it was done because the school didn't have much money, it turned out to be very beneficial.Another class I had in high school, that wouldn't normally be lumped into a Computer Science curriculum but has been a boon to my career, was good old Typing 101.
  • If you followed the CS Unplugged curriculum your students would know more about CS than most CS grads:http://csunplugged.orgIt's a really great intro to basic computer science concepts and very easy for students to understand.  Best of all you don't even need a computer per student if your school doesn't have the budget,
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  • For younger students, I think that the ability to make something professional-looking, like a real grown-up would, is paramount.  Sadly, I think this means that LOGO and BASIC aren't much use any more*.
  • So, we have a few choices.  You can try to write phone apps that look just like real phone apps, design interactive websites that look just like real interactive websites, or do something with embedded systems / robotics.  Avoid the temptation to make these things into group projects; the main thing every student needs to experience is the process of writing code, running it, debugging it, and watching the machine react to every command.
  • It is important to consider what an 11 to 18-year old is familiar with in terms of mathematics and logical thinking. An average 11-year old is probably learning about fractions, simple cartesian geometry, the concept of units, and mathematical expressions. By 15, the average student will be taking algebra, and hopefully will have the all-important concept of variables under his/her belt. So much in CS is dependent on solid understanding that symbols and tokens can represent abstract concepts, values, or algorithms. Without it, it's still possible to teach CS, but it must be done in a very different way (see Scratch).
  • At this point, concepts such as variables, parenthesis matching, and functions (of the mathematical variety) are within easy reach. Concepts like parameter passing, strings and collections, and program flow should be teachable. More advanced concepts such as recursion, references and pointers, certain data structures, and big-O may be very difficult to teach without first going through some more foundational math.
  • I tend to agree strongly with those that believe a foundational education should inspire interest and enforce concepts and critical thinking over teaching any specific language, framework, system, or dogma.
  • The key is that the concepts in CS aren't just there for the hell of it. Everything was motivated by a real problem, and few things are more satisfying than fixing something you really want to work with a cool technique or concept you just learned.
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    Great resource for teachers (especially those of us not initially trained in Computer Science) about what should 'count' as Computer Science.  Worth the read!
Martin Burrett

Science: Cool Experiments videos - 87 views

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    Watch some cool science experiments videos on Video Jug. Explore the rest of the site for more great video resources. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/Science
Martin Burrett

13 Science Experiments by @ICTmagic - 26 views

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    "A set of 13 fun science experiments that you can do in your classroom with easily available materials."
Deborah Baillesderr

Smart Science New Era in Science Education - 45 views

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    "Smart Science® online hands-on labs provide outstanding science education. Inexpensive and efficient STEM education. Built-in scientific inquiry facilitating student discovery of science. Online hands-on real experiments, not simulations. Online lab reports, easy to write and grade. Archive of lab reports obtained with a simple mouse click. Retention of lab reports and all student work for 5 years. Differentiated reading levels" Wow, pretty impressive and just might be worth the money. Do the lite demo they provide and see what you think.
Martin Burrett

Bill Nye - The Science Guy - 71 views

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    The blog of science communicator Bill Nye. The site is full of science activities and experiments to try, with video demonstrations and things to download for your class.
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    Thanks for sharing!
Michael Sheehan

Learning Never Stops: Science Bob - Making Science Fun - 4 views

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    Fun and educational science website for students. Dozens of great experiments that can be done from home or in the classroom.
Martin Burrett

The Naked Scientists - 134 views

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    The Naked Scientists site is an amazing place for everyone who loves science. Find ideas, fascinating information, experiments and a weekly science podcast and archives going back over ten years. The Naked Scientists also have a weekly show/podcast on BBC Radio 5 live along with the wonderful Dr Karl at http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/drkarl http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/Science
Nathan Dybvig

Science Projects Experiments, Educational Toys & Science Toys | Steve Spangler Science - 74 views

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    An amazing collection of step by step science experiments
hrchristenson

Science Fair Project Ideas, Answers, & Tools - 3 views

    • anorred79
       
      Use the Project Guide for any questions you have about your Science fair project.
  • Resources
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    Free Topic Selection Wizard, science fair project ideas, step by step how to do a science fair project, Ask an Expert discussion board, and science fair tips for success.
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    This is an AWESOME resource for STEM, science, and elementary teachers. Lots of lesson plans, project ideas, etc.
Martin Burrett

When fish come to school, kids get hooked on science - 14 views

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    "A programme that brings live fish into classrooms to teach the fundamentals of biology not only helps students learn, but improves their attitudes about science, a new study finds. The study of nearly 20,000 K-12 students, who raised zebrafish from embryos over the course of a week, found that kids at all grade levels showed significant learning gains. They also responded more positively to statements such as "I know what it's like to be a scientist." The results, to be published by the journal PLOS Biology, suggest that an immersive experience with a living creature can be a particularly successful strategy to engage young people in science, technology, engineering and maths."
Jay Swan

VideoScience - Experiments for Science Classrooms - 50 views

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    From site: "Are you a teacher looking for exciting experiments for your classroom? Or a kid who wants to see what you can build from everyday items? These experiments from "Science Scavenger" Dan Menelly are designed to inspire and excite kids of all ages, using only low cost materials and with very little setup time."
Marc Patton

Kinetic City: - 126 views

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    Kinetic city is a flash based resource with fun games & activities across a range of Science topics. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/science
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    Collection of science experiments, games, activities and challenges
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    science experiments and games
Martin Burrett

2aNatSciDemos - Science videos - 64 views

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    A collection of amazing science YouTube videos with experiments and demonstrations. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/science
Martin Burrett

Steve Spangler Science - 136 views

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    A wonderful YouTube channel featuring over 400 science experiments and activities to try in your class. Each video is succinct and easy to follow. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/Science
Gerald Carey

Science Experiments - 128 views

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    A huge range of very simple science experiments.
Florence Dujardin

Ethnotelling for User-generated Experiences - 30 views

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    This paper focuses on storytelling as a research tool for social sciences, especially for cultural anthropology. After a short review of the main methodological tools traditionally used in ethnography, with particular regard to observation and interview, we focus on collecting and crafting stories (ethnotelling) as suitable tools for conveying the relational nature of fieldwork. Drawing on the works of Orr, Chipchase, Marradi and Adwan/Bar-on, we show how stories – collected, mediated or made up – are valuable tools for representing experiences and identities. As a result, we suggest a different approach to user-experience design, based on the creation of "thick" environments enabling a whole range of possibilities, where users can imagine or live their own user-generated experiences.
Martin Burrett

ZOOMsci - 100 views

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    A simple collection of ideas for science experiments and activities to use in class. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/Science
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