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Jess Hazlewood

"Where's the Writer" TETYC March 2014 - 43 views

  • “Responders Are Taught, Not Born”
  • We contend that student writers will see greater value in peer response if they develop tools that allow them to participate more actively in the feedback process. With teaching suggestions like those above, writers can learn how to re-flect on their experiences with peer response. They can also learn to identify their needs as writers and how to ask questions that will solicit the feedback they need.
  • We like to limit each mock session to no more than seven minutes of back and forth between respondent and writer.
  • ...33 more annotations...
  • class suggests that the writer’s question
  • This becomes a teachable moment. When the respondent asks for assistance from the class, this break in the session becomes an opportunity for the class to assist the writer and the respondent. The writer appears stuck, not knowing what to ask. And the respondent appears perplexed, too.
  • we follow Carl Anderson’s suggestion to teach students how to ask questions about their writing through role-playing.
  • dynamic list that students freely update throughout the semester on the class classro
  • organize the questions within categories such as tone, content, evidence-based support, style, and logistics
  • The end result is a robust list of questions for writers to ask of their respondents.
  • in-class discussion about effective and less effective questions for writers
  • raft three to five questions they have about the assignment to ask of their peers as they prepare to write or revise their assignment. When appropriate, we can direct our students to the course text, where there are
  • , “Feedback: What Works for You and How Do You Get It?”
  • Students’ comments often point to their struggle to position themselves in peer response.
  • “What would it take for you to be in-vested as writers in peer response?” Students’ typical responses include the following:>“I need to know what to ask.” >“I don’t know what to ask about my writing, except for things like punctua-tion and grammar.”>“Does the person reading my work really know what the assignment is? Bet-ter than I do?”>“I’m not really sure if I’m supposed to talk or ask questions when someone is giving me feedback about my work, so I don’t really do anything. They write stuff on my paper. Sometimes I read it if I can, but I don’t really know what to do with it.”
  • it is important to offer activities to ensure that both respondents and writers are able to articulate a clear purpose of what they are trying to accomplish. These activities, guided by the pedagogies used to prepare writing center consultants
  • devote more attention to the respondent than to the writer, we may unwit-tingly be encouraging writers to be bystanders, rather than active participants, in the response process.
  • : pointing, summarizing, and reflecting
  • highlight the value of both giving and getting feedback:In 56 pages near the end of this book, we’ve explained all the good methods we know for getting feedback from classmates on your writing. . . . The ability to give responses to your classmates’ writing and to get their responses to your own writing may be the most important thing you learn from this book. (B
  • Peter Elbow and Pat Belanoff ’s first edition of A Community of Writers published in 1995, in which eleven “Sharing and Responding” techniques, d
  • While such questions are helpful to emerging writers, who depend on modeling, they lack explanation about what makes them “helpful” questions. As a result, emerging writers may perceive them as a prescriptive set of questions that must be answered (or worse, a set of questions to be “given over” to a respondent), rather than what they are intended to be: questions that could advance the writer’s thoughts and agenda.
  • this information is limited to the instructor’s manual
  • llustrates the difference be-tween vague and helpful questions, pointing out that helpful questions
  • You will need to train students to ask good questions, which will help reviewers target their attention.Questions like “How can I make this draft better?” “What grade do you think this will get?” and “What did you think?” are not helpful, as they are vague and don’t reflect anything about the writer’s own thoughts. Questions like “Am I getting off topic in the introduction when I talk about walking my sister to the corner on her first day of school?” or “Does my tone on page 3 seem harsh? I’m trying to be fair to the people who disagree with the decision I’m describing” help readers understand the writer’s purpose and will set up good conversations. (Harrington 14, emphasis added
  • uestions” when soliciting feedback (like the advice we found in many textbooks), she also provides explicit examples for doing so
  • he most explicit advice for writers about ask-ing questions and, in effect, setting up good conversations is buried in an instruc-tor’s manual for The Allyn & Bacon Guide to Writing. In thi
  • “Getting Response” chapter later in the book, they will benefit from the textbook authors’ instructions that they should in fact use questions that will help them solicit their feedback
  • dependent on what parts of the textbook they choose to read
  • point writers to a specific set of questions that they should ask of their respondents. Such instructions take a notable step toward shifting the locus of control from the respondent to helping writers engage their peers in conversation.
  • there is no mention that writers might use them for purposes of soliciting feedback.
  • we see an opportunity for modeling that is not fully realized.
  • we argue that Faigley offers respondents specific examples that empower them to actively engage the process and give feedback. We contend that emergent writers need a similar level of instruction if they are to be agents in response.
  • textbook authors offer few examples for how to get specific feedback
  • we question whether textbooks provide emergent writers with enough tools or explicit models to engage actively in peer response conversations.
  • we worked to understand how textbooks highlight the writer’s role in peer response.
  • We wanted to know what books tell writers about asking questions
  • lthough we do not discount the importance of teaching respondents how to give feedback, we argue that writers must also be taught how to request the feedback they desire.
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    Writer's role in soliciting feedback during peer edit. Suggestions for modeling and training.
Mike Dunagan

Free Technology for Teachers: 10 Sites and Apps for SAT Vocabulary Review - 4 views

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    Like many of their peers across the country, this Saturday all of the Juniors at my school will be taking the SAT. Although it's kind of late to start prepping for the test, better to do some review this week than not do any at all. The following ten websites and mobile apps are designed to help students review the type of content they're likely to encounter on the SAT.
Randolph Hollingsworth

Digital History Project hub site for historians - 28 views

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    Digital history is an emerging and rapidly changing academic field. The purpose of the Digital History Project is to educate scholars and the public about the state of the discipline by providing access to: interviews with scholars about topics related to digital history; presentations and essays about the field by noted scholars; syllabi and student projects from courses in digital history; reviews of major online projects and of tools which may be of use to digital historians; indices of peer-reviewed scholarship and digital projects; a directory of historians practicing digital history; and a clearinghouse of current events and news items of interest. Partners The site is made available through the generous support of the John and Catherine Angle Fund. It received production assistance from the New Media Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. This site is maintained by Douglas Seefeldt, Assistant Professor of History & Faculty Fellow, Center for Digital Research in the Humanities, and William G. Thomas, III, John and Catherine Angle Chair in the Humanities and Professor of History, both of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.
Martin Burrett

Positive school climates can narrow achievement gaps - 19 views

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    Positive school climates contribute to academic achievement and can improve outcomes for students from low socioeconomic backgrounds, according to a new study published today in Review of Educational Research, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association. In a comprehensive analysis of research published since 2000, U.S. and Israeli researchers found substantial evidence that schools with positive climates can narrow achievement gaps among students of different socioeconomic backgrounds and between students with stronger and weaker academic abilities...
Marc Patton

MERLOT - Multimedia Educational Resource for Learning and Online Teaching - 22 views

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    provides over 20,000 learning materials categorised into seven main areas: Arts, Business, Education, Humanities, Mathematics and Statistics, Science and Technology\n, Social Sciences.
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    Repository of learning objects and materials, multidisciplinary, and includes information literacy instruction.
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    Putting Educational Innovations Into Practice Find peer reviewed online teaching and learning materials. Share advice and expertise about education with expert colleagues. Be recognized for your contributions to quality education.
Sheri Edwards

in education | exploring our connective educational landscape - 27 views

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    creative commons online, peer-reviewed, open access journal
Randolph Hollingsworth

Welcome to the Middle College National Consortium - MCNC - 5 views

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    "Our focus is on professional development and staff leadership; democratic school governance and peer review; comprehensive academic, social and emotional student support; and high school-college collaboration."
Roland Gesthuizen

Montgomery County, Md., Sets Example With Teacher Evaluations - NYTimes.com - 42 views

  • a major failing of Race to the Top’s teacher-evaluation system is that it is being imposed from above rather than being developed by the teachers and administrators who will use it
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    The Montgomery County Public Schools system here has a highly regarded program for evaluating teachers, providing them extra support if they are performing poorly and getting rid of those who do not improve. The program, Peer Assistance and Review (PAR) uses several hundred senior teachers to mentor both newcomers and struggling veterans. If the mentoring does not work, the PAR panel - made up of eight teachers and eight principals - can vote to fire the teacher.
Stacy Olson

SWORD - 6 views

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    Peer reviewing of papers
Randolph Hollingsworth

National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships (NACEP) offers accreditation for concurrent enrollment programs - 0 views

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    To earn accreditation from NACEP, concurrent enrollment programs conduct a self-study, document how their programs adhere to NACEP's seventeen standards, and are evaluated by peer reviewers from NACEP-accredited programs. Currently 89 programs nationwide accredited by NACEP: http://nacep.org/docs/accreditation/NACEPAccreditedPrograms.pdf
Fernando Escobar

Digital Culture & Education - 88 views

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    Digital Culture & Education (DCE) is an international inter-disciplinary peer-reviewed journal. This interactive, open-access web-published journal is for those interested in digital culture and education. The journal is devoted to analysing the impact of digital culture on identity, education, art, society, culture and narrative within social, political, economic, cultural and historical contexts.
Thieme Hennis

About | The Open Master's Program - 21 views

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    "Learning- even "self-directed learning"- is an inherently social activity. The Open Master's is a global community of small groups for self-directed learners, offering each other the structure, accountability, relationships, and sense of forward direction that are often hard to find outside formal programs and institutions. These groups are using and building on an open source framework of shared practices to help us: Master the art of social, self-directed learning Be more intentional about our learning journeys Take bolder risks in our journeys of becoming Discover and share our unique gifts Ensure that our short-term learning goals feed into our longer-term vision for transformation for ourselves and the world We invite any existing community, organization, or even groups of friends or colleagues to use the Open Master's framework to make their own learning process more intentional.  You can do that simply by: Mapping out a personal plan or curriculum, including a clear statement of purpose and some intentions for your own learning journey, and sharing them on a personal website or blog Bringing the rhythm of semesters back into your life, including regular opportunities for evaluation and reflection Developing deeper relationships with study buddies, mentors, and advisers Starting an Open Master's group with a clear commitment to study together, support each other, and share your work Offering a presentation or organizing a study group on a topic that interests you Maintaining a portfolio of learning projects (including professional work) you've completed and reviewed with peers and mentors We also invite you to link up with the broader global community of Open Master's groups by joining regional or global events to spotlight members, mix with members across groups, and cross-pollinate ideas or strategies that are working in different contexts."
Cindy Edwards

Turnitin : Leading Plagiarism Checker, Online Grading and Peer Review - 60 views

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    "Ensures original work by checking submitted papers against 20+ billion web pages, 220+ million student papers and leading library databases and publications. Saves time and improves feedback through online grading where standard and customized marks appear directly on the student's paper. "
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    Check papers against 24+ billion web pages, 250+ million student papers and 110,000+ publications. Save instructors' time while providing rich feedback on student written work. Improve student writing by engaging them in the peer review process.
Florence Dujardin

Online Game Teaches Citation Skills - The Chronicle of Higher Education - 131 views

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    The game, BiblioBouts, turns collecting citations into a competitive event, pitting students against their classmates. Students are rewarded for their research skills and their ability to differentiate between good and bad material. To play, they find sources, which are judged by their peers for relevance and credibility, and then measure the worth of sources their classmates find. They gain more points the more sources they assess accurately and the better their own sources are judged.
tab_ras

The use of social networking sites for foreign language learning: An autoethnographic study of Livemocha - 19 views

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    Despite their spectacular growth in both daily life and mainstream education, little research to date has been conducted concerning the use of social networking sites in foreign language learning. The aim of this study, therefore, is to examine the use of such sites to learn a foreign language. Using an auto-ethnographic approach that included self-aware participation, learner diaries and peer debriefing, we investigated the social networking site Livemocha to study Korean from our perspectives as native speakers and experienced teachers of English. Specifically, we focused our questions on aspects of socio-collaborative principles and practice. Results of a grounded, thematic analysis indicate that the site had number of counter-productive pedagogical impediments to language learning that included, for example, flaws in site design. We conclude our paper with suggestions for improved foreign language learning through social networking sites.
Matt Renwick

E-Portfolios Link Academic Achievements to Career Success -- Campus Technology - 35 views

  • Another area that's still hazy is the e-portfolio feedback system. As Pirie put it, "If I have no audience for what I'm doing, why should I care?" But the question is, who should do the reviewing and provide the feedback to the student — faculty members, the program adviser, somebody from the career services department or peers in the program?
    • Matt Renwick
       
      Audience
  • "We don't know what the right choice or mix of reviewers is," she conceded, "but we do know [e-portfolios] should be reviewed on a regular basis" to get specific feedback to the student around content, structure and overall usability.
    • Matt Renwick
       
      Purpose
  • And there are questions around expanding the usage of e-portfolios within the online program. "Are we missing pieces?" asked Pirie. "What touchpoints are the most essential for the students throughout that three-year process?"
    • Matt Renwick
       
      Audience
  • ...1 more annotation...
  • the renewed focus on e-portfolios will help students reconnect with "their own purpose," Enders said. "That purpose is unique to them. It takes a lot of work and time to develop self-awareness about your strengths and passions and then understand why you're on this planet.
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    Access-Purpose-Audience all addressed in this IHE ePortfolio system plan.
D. S. Koelling

Wikipedia Comes of Age - The Chronicle of Higher Education - 38 views

  • Not all information is created equal. The bottom layers (the most ubiquitous, whose sources are the most ephemeral, and with the least amount of validation) lead to layers with greater dependability, all the way to the highest layers, made up mostly of academic resources maintained and validated by academic publishers that use multiple peer reviews, trained editors, and scholarly reviewers. When the system is effective, the layers serve to reinforce one another through clear pathways that allow queries to move from one layer to another with little resistance.
  • Most of the nearly 2,500 students who responded said they consult Wikipedia, but when questioned more deeply, it became clear that they use it for, as one student put it, "pre-research." In other words, to gain context on a topic, to orient themselves, students start with Wikipedia. That makes perfect sense. Through user-generated efforts, Wikipedia is comprehensive, current, and far and away the most trustworthy Web resource of its kind. It is not the bottom layer of authority, nor the top, but in fact the highest layer without formal vetting. In this unique role, it therefore serves as an ideal bridge between the validated and unvalidated Web.
  • Most of the nearly 2,500 students who responded said they consult Wikipedia, but when questioned more deeply, it became clear that they use it for, as one student put it, "pre-research." In other words, to gain context on a topic, to orient themselves, students start with Wikipedia.
  • ...2 more annotations...
  • My opinion of Wikipedia, like the tool itself, has radically evolved over time. Not only am I now supportive of Wikipedia, but I feel that it can play a vital role in formal educational settings
  • The key challenge for the scholarly community, in which I include academic publishers such as Oxford University Press, is to work actively with Wikipedia to strengthen its role in "pre-research." We need to build stronger links from its entries to more advanced resources that have been created and maintained by the academy.
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    C. Grathwohl argues that Wikipedia plays a vital middle layer of authority for students conducting pre-research; scholars, he says, should work to assure that links in Wikipeida lead students to more advanced research that's been validated by the academic community.
Ed Webb

Ian Bogost - Reading Online Sucks - 38 views

  • Even if the text is separated into chunks with comment space following each, that's still not the same as being able to star or underline a particularly provocative sentence with a word or two (or just a "?" or "!") in the margin. This is even more important in some ways if you're a peer reviewing a text than if you're making jottings for your own later use. Perhaps if there were a browser plugin that would allow you to highlight and comment on any text, Word-style? (There probably is one already.) So that each time you come back to the page your comments will be right where you made them? Would that recapture something of the way I interact with my bound books now?
    • Ed Webb
       
      That would be diigo...
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    Did anyone let him know?
Melanie Weser

Adobe Education Exchange - 65 views

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    Exchange lesson plans and projects with other educators across the U.S.  Great way to share and collaborate.  Includes peer review, rating system, and discussion areas.
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