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Use Post-Its + Evernote For Ongoing Literacy Assessment | Reading By Example - 73 views

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    As 21st century educators, we don't have to be tethered to technology to reap the benefits. By using digital tools such as Evernote and Post-Its to support quality instruction, instead of the other way around, we can stay focused on the learner and their needs.
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Learning Through Listening | Abstract - 71 views

  • new technologies are challenging traditional definitions of what it means to be literate
    • joyce L
       
      In what ways have literacy being changed by new technologies? Is reading / writing / speaking / listening skills different when applied to new contexts of online communication or online 'reading/writing'?
  • digital media have revived the importance of listening and oral literacy
  • individual learners approach the same learning task in widely varied ways, it is essential to provide multiple means for achieving success. Learners need multiple ways of recognizing important information, variety in how to strategically approach a learning task and multiple means of becoming engaged in learning
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Exactly What The Common Core Standards Say About Technology - 129 views

  • use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate with others; demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to type a minimum of one page in a single sitting.
  • Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using different mediums
  •  Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) in order to make informed decisions and solve problems, evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source and noting any discrepancies among the data.
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  • Make strategic use of digital media
  • Publishing
  • Collaboration
  • Evaluation
  • Integration is a matter of design, and produces considerable cognitive load on a learner.
  • Social media professional learning networks (PLN) from linkedin to twitter, facebook to even pinterest, can be dominated by education technology discussion rather than broader concerns of how people learn , likely because those educators tending towards technology are on these digital networks to begin with.
  • rather requires learners to make complex decisions about how, when, and why to use technology–something educators must do as well.
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    "@POUSDSupt: Exactly What The Common Core Standards Say About Technology http://t.co/WTRFq2LUTt via @zite #ccss #edtech" Nicely presented.
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    Tech standards in the common core
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Understanding Content Curation - 70 views

  • My conclusion is that to do justice to using the term “curating” for educational resources, inquiry must be a part of the process. Part of this process is deciding what goes “in” to the collection – meaning many, many items are evaluated and set aside.
  • Themes have a common unifying element – but don’t necessarily explain the “why.” Theme supports a central idea – Context allows the learner to determine why that idea (or in this case, resource) is important. So, as collecting progresses into curating, context becomes essential to determine what to keep, and what to discard.
  • curating, it seems that collecting serves primarily the needs or interests of the collector. With curating, a larger goal is to benefit not only the collector, but other potential learners as well. It is meant to be shared. And, both the process and the product of curating help the curator as well as those who view the curated collection to understand and to learn.
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  • learning that it generates. It gets back to my belief that learning is a social endeavor.  Participatory learning leads to increased understanding.  This led me to my next big understanding
  • understanding as a result of this inquiry.
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    good 'compare and contrast' between what is just collection of digital content resources and what the 'added value' of curation of digital resources means
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15 Habits For Learning In The 21st Century | Edudemic - 14 views

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    while learning will likely always have as its foundation the ability to read, write, and think, in the fast-paced, information-rich, socialized digital world of 2012, new currencies are emerging for learners to master-new skills, concepts, and thinking habits that are crucial to a consistent ability to absorb, process, and redistribute data and original thinking as a global citizen
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Cool Tools for 21st Century Learners: SAMR Through the Lens of the Common Core - 135 views

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    "One of my goals is to weave digital tools into the Common Core to design flexible, student driven learning experiences that are Above the Line as defined by the SAMR model. While this might sound like a mouthful of EdTech, I assure you that combining all that is on our crowded plates is far better than tackling each individual initiative in isolation. This idea is supported by the Partnership for 21st Century Skills."
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Inside the School Silicon Valley Thinks Will Save Education | WIRED - 9 views

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    "AUTHOR: ISSIE LAPOWSKY. ISSIE LAPOWSKY DATE OF PUBLICATION: 05.04.15. 05.04.15 TIME OF PUBLICATION: 7:00 AM. 7:00 AM INSIDE THE SCHOOL SILICON VALLEY THINKS WILL SAVE EDUCATION Click to Open Overlay Gallery Students in the youngest class at the Fort Mason AltSchool help their teacher, Jennifer Aguilar, compile a list of what they know and what they want to know about butterflies. CHRISTIE HEMM KLOK/WIRED SO YOU'RE A parent, thinking about sending your 7-year-old to this rogue startup of a school you heard about from your friend's neighbor's sister. It's prospective parent information day, and you make the trek to San Francisco's South of Market neighborhood. You walk up to the second floor of the school, file into a glass-walled conference room overlooking a classroom, and take a seat alongside dozens of other parents who, like you, feel that public schools-with their endless bubble-filled tests, 38-kid classrooms, and antiquated approach to learning-just aren't cutting it. At the same time, you're thinking: this school is kind of weird. On one side of the glass is a cheery little scene, with two teachers leading two different middle school lessons on opposite ends of the room. But on the other side is something altogether unusual: an airy and open office with vaulted ceilings, sunlight streaming onto low-slung couches, and rows of hoodie-wearing employees typing away on their computers while munching on free snacks from the kitchen. And while you can't quite be sure, you think that might be a robot on wheels roaming about. Then there's the guy who's standing at the front of the conference room, the school's founder. Dressed in the San Francisco standard issue t-shirt and jeans, he's unlike any school administrator you've ever met. But the more he talks about how this school uses technology to enhance and individualize education, the more you start to like what he has to say. And so, if you are truly fed up with the school stat
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The power of digital student portfolios SmartBlogs - 54 views

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    Students and teachers can use digital tools to document current understandings, make revisions as thinking changes, share student products both locally and globally and celebrate successes with peers and parents. Although this practice is only one part of a balanced assessment system, there are many benefits that learners, both student and teacher, can gain for developing digital portfolios.
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Ed/ITLib Digital Library → Enduring Themes and New Horizons for Educational T... - 27 views

  • the enduring themes that emerge across contexts and times. These themes include the need to: negotiate educational beliefs in each situation; focus on the details of learning design; consider the importance of relevant and authentic tasks that enable learners to develop lifelong learning and earning capabilities; and accommodate shifting roles of both teachers and learners in a mutual comfort zone so that all participants benefit
    • Dallas McPheeters
       
      Excellent presentation that distills the edtech world to the issues of critical mass.
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The Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Media Literacy Education - 60 views

  • when they occur within a restricted-access network, do enjoy certain copyright advantages
  • we as a society give limited property rights to creators to encourage them to produce culture; at the same time, we give other creators the chance to use that same copyrighted material, without permission or payment
  • Did the unlicensed use "transform" the material taken from the copyrighted work by using it for a different purpose than that of the original, or did it just repeat the work for the same intent and value as the original? • Was the material taken appropriate in kind and amount, considering the nature of the copyrighted work and of the use?
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  • If the answers to these two questions are "yes," a court is likely to find a use fair
  • whether the use will cause excessive economic harm to the copyright owner
  • the purpose of copyright—to promote the advancement of knowledge through balancing the rights of owners and users.
  • In some cases, this will mean using a clip or excerpt; in other cases, the whole work is needed. Whenever possible, educators should provide proper attribution and model citation practices that are appropriate to the form and context of use.
  • educators should provide reasonable protection against third-party access and downloads
  • educators using concepts and techniques of media literacy should be free to enable learners to incorporate, modify, and re-present existing media objects in their own classroom work
  • Students’ use of copyrighted material should not be a substitute for creative effort
  • Students should be able to understand and demonstrate, in a manner appropriate to their developmental level, how their use of a copyrighted work repurposes or transforms the original.
  • but cannot rely on fair use when their goal is simply to establish a mood or convey an emotional tone, or when they employ popular songs simply to exploit their appeal and popularity
  • material that is incorporated under fair use should be properly attributed wherever possible
  • attribution, in itself, does not convert an infringing use into a fair one.
  • If student work that incorporates, modifies, and re-presents existing media content meets the transformativeness standard, it can be distributed to wide audiences under the doctrine of fair use.
  • When sharing is confined to a delimited network, such uses are more likely to receive special consideration under the fair use doctrine
  • there are no cut-and-dried rules (such as 10 percent of the work being quoted, or 400 words of text, or two bars of music, or 10 seconds of video).
  • Transformativeness, a key value in fair use law, can involve modifying material or putting material in a new context, or both
  • Copyright Act itself makes it clear that educational uses will often be considered fair because they add important pedagogical value to referenced media objects.
  • If educators or learners want to share their work only with a class (or another defined, closed group) they are in a favorable position
  • if work is going to be shared widely, it is good to be able to rely on transformativeness
  • courts have found that asking permission and then being rejected has actually enhanced fair use claims.
  • We don’t know of any lawsuit actually brought by an American media company against an educator over the use of media in the educational process
  • Lack of clarity reduces learning and limits the ability to use digital tools. Some educators close their classroom doors and hide what they fear is infringement; others hyper-comply with imagined rules that are far stricter than the law requires, limiting the effectiveness of their teaching and their students’ learning.
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    Good place to look for guidelines about use of media
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e-Portfolios: An overview : JISC - 69 views

  • But most importantly we are interesed in e-portfolios because there is emerging, often powerful evidence from practitioners  and learners of how e-portfolios can promote more profound forms of learning, as well their further potential in supporting for example transition between institutions and stages of education, and in supporting professional development and applications for professional accreditation.
  • An e-portfolio is a purposeful aggregation of digital items - ideas, evidence, reflections, feedback etc. which 'presents' a selected audience with evidence of a person's learning and/or ability
  • Behind any product, or presentation, lie rich and complex processes of planning, synthesising, sharing, discussing, reflecting, giving, receifing and responding to feedback.
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  • Descriptions of e-portfolio processes also tend to include the concepts of learners drawing from both informal and and formal learning activities to create their e-portfolios
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Languages Online - 42 views

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    This site is designed for English as an additional language, native English speakers and MFL learners with some great ready-made resources, including videos. There is also a collection of downloadable resources for making customised games and activities which can be used in a wide range of subjects. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/Cross+Curricular
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What Schools are Really Blocking When They Block Social Media | The Young and the Digital - 65 views

  • our schools are disconnected from young learners and how their learning practices are evolving.  The decision to block social media is inconsistent with how students use social media as a powerful node in their learning network
  • In the not so distant future the notion that schools should block social media will become difficult to defend.  Before that happens schools will have to reimagine their mission in the lives of young learners, the communities that they serve, and the extraordinary possibilities of networked media and networked literacy.
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    "The debates about schools and social media are a subject of great public and policy interests.  In reality, the debate has been shaped by one key fact: the almost universal decision by school administrators to block social media."
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21st Century Literacies: Tools for Reading the World - 118 views

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    Literacy for the 21st century learner
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Storybricks - 160 views

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    A 3D role-playing game designer that encourages learners to create stories narratives by playing the game. Designing games is fun and it is easy to share with your class mates. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/English
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What 21st Century Skills? - CloudEd - 78 views

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    Getting into the mindset to foster 21st century skills in learners.
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Related Top News - Tech trends every school leader should know - 0 views

  • According to William Rust, research director for the IT research and consulting firm Gartner, there is a new digital divide occurring in schools. Whereas this divide used to refer to whether or not students had access to technology, now it concerns whether schools are using technology effectively to achieve results.
  • Citing a report by Ian Jukes and Anita Dose of the InfoSavvy Group, Rust said digital native learners prefer (1) receiving information quickly and from multiple resources; (2) parallel processing and multitasking; (3) processing pictures, sounds, and video before text; (4) random access to hyperlinked multimedia information; and (5) interacting and networking simultaneously with many others
  • "The biggest shift we're seeing right now is student preference shifting from print to digital resources," Rust noted. "It's all about the web."
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How Do Digital Portfolios Help Students Learn? - 74 views

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    Digital student portfolios can provide what other assessment tools cannot: Real, unabridged, minimally processed artifacts of learning that make sense to all the learners in the classroom, including the teacher. Technology used in this way can bring us as close as we can get to peering inside our students' hearts and minds to find out what they currently know and are able to do.
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Digitally Speaking / Blogging - 169 views

  • Using Feed Readers

     

    Feed readers are probably the most important digital tool for today's learner because they make sifting through the amazing amount of content added to the Internet easy.  Also known as aggregators, feed readers are free tools that can automatically check nearly any website for new content dozens of times a day---saving ridiculous amounts of time and customizing learning experiences for anyone. 

     

    Imagine never having to go hunting for new information from your favorite sources again.  Learning goes from a frustrating search through thousands of marginal links written by questionable characters to quickly browsing the thoughts of writers that you trust, respect and enjoy.

     

    Sounds too good to be true, doesn't it?

     

    It's not!  Here's a Commoncraft tutorial explaining RSS Feeds in Plain English:

     

    Feed readers can quickly and easily support blogging in the classroom, allowing teachers to provide students with ready access to age-appropriate sites of interest that are connected to the curriculum.  By collecting sites in advance and organizing them with a feed reader, teachers can make accessing information manageable for their students. 

    Here are several examples of feed readers in action:

     

    Student Blogs

    http://www.pageflakes.com/wferriter/20982438

     

     

    This feed list includes several elementary, middle and high school blogs that students can explore during silent reading or while online at home.

     

     

    Current Events 

    http://www.pageflakes.com/wferriter/16714925

     

    This feed list includes links to several news websites that cover topics that are a part of one teacher's required social studies curriculum. 

     

    Global Warming

    http://www.pageflakes.com/wferriter/22534539

    Used specifically as a part of one classroom project, this feed list contains information related to global warming that students can use as a starting point for individual research. 

     

    While there are literally dozens of different feed reader programs to choose from (Bloglines and Google Reader are two biggies), Pageflakes is a favorite of many educators because it has a visual layout that is easy to read and interesting to look at.  It is also free and web-based.  That means that users can check accounts from any computer with an Internet connection.  Finally, Pageflakes makes it quick and easy to add new websites to a growing feed list—and to get rid of any websites that users are no longer interested in.

    What's even better:  Pageflakes has been developing a teacher version of their tool just for us that includes an online grade tracker, a task list and a built in writing tutor.  As Pageflakes works to perfect its teacher product, this might become one of the first kid-friendly feed readers on the market. Teacher Pageflakes users can actually blog and create a discussion forum directly in their feed reader---making an all-in-one digital home for students. 

     

    For more information about the teacher version of Pageflakes, check out this review:

     

    http://teacherleaders.typepad.com/the_tempered_radical/2008/02/pageflakes-for.html

     

     

    For more information on using feed readers to organize and manage information, check out this handout: 

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    Checklist to use before embarking on a blogging project with students
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Digital Student Portfolios | Reading By Example - 120 views

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    Looking forward to it!
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