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paul lowe

Web 2.0 Storytelling: Emergence of a New Genre (EDUCAUSE Review) | EDUCAUSE CONNECT - 3 views

  • A story has a beginning, a middle, and a cleanly wrapped-up ending. Whether told around a campfire, read from a book, or played on a DVD, a story goes from point A to B and then C. It follows a trajectory, a Freytag Pyramid—perhaps the line of a human life or the stages of the hero's journey. A story is told by one person or by a creative team to an audience that is usually quiet, even receptive. Or at least that’s what a story used to be, and that’s how a story used to be told. Today, with digital networks and social media, this pattern is changing. Stories now are open-ended, branching, hyperlinked, cross-media, participatory, exploratory, and unpredictable. And they are told in new ways: Web 2.0 storytelling picks up these new types of stories and runs with them, accelerating the pace of creation and participation while revealing new directions for narratives to flow.
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    A story has a beginning, a middle, and a cleanly wrapped-up ending. Whether told around a campfire, read from a book, or played on a DVD, a story goes from point A to B and then C. It follows a trajectory, a Freytag Pyramid-perhaps the line of a human life or the stages of the hero's journey. A story is told by one person or by a creative team to an audience that is usually quiet, even receptive. Or at least that's what a story used to be, and that's how a story used to be told. Today, with digital networks and social media, this pattern is changing. Stories now are open-ended, branching, hyperlinked, cross-media, participatory, exploratory, and unpredictable. And they are told in new ways: Web 2.0 storytelling picks up these new types of stories and runs with them, accelerating the pace of creation and participation while revealing new directions for narratives to flow.
Tracy Tuten

Tech Learning TL Advisor Blog and Ed Tech Ticker Blogs from TL Blog Staff - TechLearning.com - 60 views

  • Mixbook (or Mixbook for Educators) is a photo-based creation platform that offers hundreds of layouts and backgrounds to choose from along with customizable frames and text to make your book beautiful. Just pick a layout, drag-and-drop your photos into the photo slots, and edit to your heart's content.
  • Though the site's examples suggest using the books to gather wedding, travel, and baby albums, this program can absolutely used to create stories around historic photographs and artifacts, original art, to produce a class yearbook, to share an oral or personal history or journey, to tell the story of a field trip.  Mixbook for Educators now offers a secure collaborative environment for sharing their ebooks, as well as discounts on printed products, should you choose to print.  (A similar option is Scrapblog.)
  • Storybird, a collaborative storybook building space designed for ages 3-13, inspires young writers to create text around the work of professional artists and the collection of art is growing. Two (or more) people create a Storybird in a round robin fashion by writing their own text and inserting pictures. They then have the option of sharing their Storybird privately or publicly on the network. The final product can be printed (soon), watched on screen, played with like a toy, or shared through a worldwide library. Storybird is also a simple publishing platform for writers and artists that allows them to experiment, publish their stories, and connect with their fans.
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  • Myth and Legend Creator 2 shares a collection of traditional stories from England and around the world to hear and read. The site offers historical context for each story, story time lines and maps, ideas for use of the story in the classroom, and student work inspired by the story.  The Story Creator--with its libraries of backgrounds, characters, props, text bubbles, sound and video recording tools, and options to upload--provides students easy opportunities to create their own versions of traditional stories.
  • The Historic Tale Construction Kit is similar in that it helps students construct stories around a theme, in this case stories set in the middle ages with movable, scalable beasts, folks, braves, buildings. and old-style text.
  • Tikatok is a platform devoted to kid book publishing at a variety of levels.  Children have the option of exploring a collection of interactive story templates called StorySparks prompts, personalizing an existing book with their own names in Books2Go, with their own names, or starting from scratch in Create Your Own Book. Tikatok’s Classroom Program allows teachers to share lesson plans, view and edit students' work online, encourage collaboration, and track writing progress.
  • Big Universe is both an online library and a publishing and sharing community for grades K through 8.  Using Big Universe Author, students may create, research, and collaborate on books using a library of more than 7000 images and interactive tools.
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    Digital publishing tools for creating story books
wendy allen

The Power of Digital Story | Edutopia - 45 views

  • places of learning must be places of listening that allow time and space for the speed of life to be digested in a meaningful way.
  • the flood of technology tools that allow for instant communication has spun us back into a golden age where story again dominates the media landscape
  • Great digital stories are rooted in their narrative.
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  • A thousand words isn't the true power of images. Great images link story elements, humanize the abstract, and force the audience to see invisible people and places. Images are a gateway into the soul of stories.
  • the best of digital storytelling comes from the art of iteration
  • Today's best tools for digital story will quickly become relics
  • story inspires story
Deborah Baillesderr

Digital Compass | Common Sense Media - 44 views

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    "Learn the fundamentals of digital citizenship through animated, choose-your-own-adventure interactive experiences, designed for grades 6-9. Invite students to explore digital dilemmas, make good (and not-so-good) decisions, and try out possible solutions through stories and mini-games - all without risking their real-world reputations. Discover how Common Sense Education's award-winning digital literacy and citizenship curriculum seamlessly integrates into blended-learning environments. "
Debbie Prunty

DigiTales - The Art of Telling Digital Stories - 5 views

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    DigiTales - The Art of Telling Digital Stories. Crafting and sharing personal, emotional stories with today's digital tools.
Roland Gesthuizen

Digital Story Telling | CEGSA - 120 views

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    A digital story is created using multimedia it weaves together images, music and voice. It takes the audience on a multi-sensory journey. There are range of applications available to help you make your story:
Tanya Hudson

Storybird - Create and share beautifully illustrated digital stories! - 91 views

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    Collaboarative Digital Storytelling
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    This site is wonderful for younger students and older ELLs. Using exquisite art graphics from an extensive library of images children create online storybooks. The fanciful and beautiful graphics inspire the creator to write a story. The program then publishes the online book with a default "private" setting. This site appears to be carefully monitored and supervised. Excellent for ELA.
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    This site is wonderful for younger students and older ELLs. Using exquisite art graphics from an extensive library of images children create online storybooks. The fanciful and beautiful graphics inspire the creator to write a story. The program then publishes the online book with a default "private" setting. This site appears to be carefully monitored and supervised. Excellent for ELA.
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    Choose an artist, then create a story by selecting artwork. 
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    Story Bird widely used story book maker website. It has great templates picture bank. It's ease to use and the results look wonderful. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/English
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    Storybirds are short, art-inspired stories you make to share, read, and print.
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    Combine your words with high-quality artwork from talented illustrators around the world.
Mark Woolley

Literacy Alive - Digital story telling for 21st century learners - 140 views

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    A presentation about "Engaging students with literacy to create powerful, rich multimedia stories that bring their writing to life. " Essentially a movie from a Prezi, it guides teachers through 4 different digital storytelling options and why they are important.
Don Doehla

Connect to a Chorus of Voices - 35 views

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    "A collection of stories is the way to rewrite a singular history that has been in textbooks....I think it takes a lot of people telling a lot of stories about what their experience has been, what the experience of their ancestors has been." The speaker is Tommy Orange, an Oakland-based media consultant, writer, and digital storyteller who is an enrolled member of the Southern Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma and describes himself as "a father, a son, a brother, an uncle, a partner, a storyteller, and a committed member and servant of his community." For Issue #3 of The Republic of Stories, our quarterly online publication, Arlene Goldbard interviewed Tommy and Tony Platt, author of books inlcuding Grave Matters: Excavating California's Buried Past, who lives in Berkeley and Big Lagoon, California, and serves as secretary of the Coalition to Protect Yurok Cultural Legacies at O-pyuweg (Big Lagoon).
Glenn Hervieux

When is it a digital story? - 53 views

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    Sherry Hegstrom, on her blog "Emerging Technologies in Education" asks the question: What makes for a digital story? She brings up some great questions for us to consider and there are some comments that engage the discussion. Check it out!
anonymous

This Exquisite Forest - 72 views

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    This site is a collaborative online drawing and animation project from Google and the UK's Tate Modern art gallery. Draw part of a picture and add to other people's creation. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/Art%2C+Craft+%26+Design
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    An online art project developed by Google, this site is a place for digital storytelling through pictures, not words. Students can work collaboratively to create a short animated story, with each animation building off the previous branches. Students can create their own seeds & invite others to grow a tree with them. Before students can create their own seeds, they do have to contribute to an already existing tree. If a student does not feel they can express their words with an animation, think about having the students pair up. Have one student become an author & write an outline of the story, while the other student draws the animation of the story.
Marc Patton

The Digital Generation Project | Edutopia - 36 views

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    Students selected from self-produced 2 minute YouTube audition clips. George Lucas Foundation then put professional production into telling their stories.
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    Today's kids are born digital -- born into a media-rich, networked world of infinite possibilities. But their digital lifestyle is about more than just cool gadgets; it's about engagement, self-directed learning, creativity, and empowerment.
Michael Sheehan

Learning Never Stops: Education Uses for Digital Storytelling - 9 views

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    This site walks you through the process of creating a digital story.
Martin Burrett

Smories - new stories for children, read by children - 124 views

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    An amazing digital storytelling project. Watch videos of children telling original stories. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/English
Virginia Meadow

Frames - Animation and Digital Storytelling Software | Tech4Learning - 6 views

  • Introducing Frames 4! Frames is educational software for stop-motion animation, claymation, and digital storytelling. Creating illustrated animations, movies and digital stories engages students in the curriculum, encourages problem-solving, promotes creativity, and helps students develop 21st-century communication skills. Students can use Frames to create movies, animated GIF files, and Flash animations to share with the world.
  • dents more than creating clay animation. With Frames as the foundation in the Clay Animation Kit, this motivating process transforms your classroom into an active learning
  • Clay Animation Nothing engages stu
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  • Communicating visually is an essential 21st-century skill. With Frames integrated drawing tools, students can illustrate their own animated diagrams, graphs, procedures, and more, helping them understand concepts that are difficult to explain using text alone. (L
  • ents more than creating clay animation! Use Frames to transform your classroom into an active learning environment and begin having your student develop exciting cross-curricular group projects that incorporate writing and technology skills. (Learn More)
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    Frames is educational software for stop-motion animation, claymation, and digital storytelling. Frames helps students develop 21st-century communication skills.
Clint Heitz

The Reading Brain in the Digital Age: The Science of Paper versus Screens - Scientific American - 25 views

  • The matter is by no means settled. Before 1992 most studies concluded that people read slower, less accurately and less comprehensively on screens than on paper. Studies published since the early 1990s, however, have produced more inconsistent results: a slight majority has confirmed earlier conclusions, but almost as many have found few significant differences in reading speed or comprehension between paper and screens. And recent surveys suggest that although most people still prefer paper—especially when reading intensively—attitudes are changing as tablets and e-reading technology improve and reading digital books for facts and fun becomes more common.
  • Compared with paper, screens may also drain more of our mental resources while we are reading and make it a little harder to remember what we read when we are done. A parallel line of research focuses on people's attitudes toward different kinds of media. Whether they realize it or not, many people approach computers and tablets with a state of mind less conducive to learning than the one they bring to paper.
  • Both anecdotally and in published studies, people report that when trying to locate a particular piece of written information they often remember where in the text it appeared. We might recall that we passed the red farmhouse near the start of the trail before we started climbing uphill through the forest; in a similar way, we remember that we read about Mr. Darcy rebuffing Elizabeth Bennett on the bottom of the left-hand page in one of the earlier chapters.
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  • At least a few studies suggest that by limiting the way people navigate texts, screens impair comprehension.
  • Because of their easy navigability, paper books and documents may be better suited to absorption in a text. "The ease with which you can find out the beginning, end and everything inbetween and the constant connection to your path, your progress in the text, might be some way of making it less taxing cognitively, so you have more free capacity for comprehension," Mangen says.
  • An e-reader always weighs the same, regardless of whether you are reading Proust's magnum opus or one of Hemingway's short stories. Some researchers have found that these discrepancies create enough "haptic dissonance" to dissuade some people from using e-readers. People expect books to look, feel and even smell a certain way; when they do not, reading sometimes becomes less enjoyable or even unpleasant. For others, the convenience of a slim portable e-reader outweighs any attachment they might have to the feel of paper books.
  • In one of his experiments 72 volunteers completed the Higher Education Entrance Examination READ test—a 30-minute, Swedish-language reading-comprehension exam consisting of multiple-choice questions about five texts averaging 1,000 words each. People who took the test on a computer scored lower and reported higher levels of stress and tiredness than people who completed it on paper.
  • Perhaps, then, any discrepancies in reading comprehension between paper and screens will shrink as people's attitudes continue to change. The star of "A Magazine Is an iPad That Does Not Work" is three-and-a-half years old today and no longer interacts with paper magazines as though they were touchscreens, her father says. Perhaps she and her peers will grow up without the subtle bias against screens that seems to lurk in the minds of older generations. In current research for Microsoft, Sellen has learned that many people do not feel much ownership of e-books because of their impermanence and intangibility: "They think of using an e-book, not owning an e-book," she says. Participants in her studies say that when they really like an electronic book, they go out and get the paper version. This reminds Sellen of people's early opinions of digital music, which she has also studied. Despite initial resistance, people love curating, organizing and sharing digital music today. Attitudes toward e-books may transition in a similar way, especially if e-readers and tablets allow more sharing and social interaction than they currently do.
Randolph Hollingsworth

Women's History Sources - Primary Sources in Archives, Historic Sites and Museums, and Libraries - 40 views

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    Women's History Sources is a collaborative blog that serves as a current awareness tool for anyone who is interested in primary sources at archives, historic sites and museums, and libraries. Some of the types of sources that the blog covers: * New exhibits in archives, libraries, and museums * New digital collections (artifacts, diaries, oral histories, photos, etc.) * Featured objects/documents from other blogs and websites * "In the News" - stories that feature original documents or artifacts. * "On this Day" - digital resources that are related to an event on a specific date. * Recent books that include letters, diaries, photographs, etc. Audience 1. Archivists, Librarians, and Museum curators/personnel 2. Historians 3. College students 4. K-12 Teachers 5. General public with an interest in women's history Geographic Coverage Although the initial emphasis has been on women in United States history, the blog will become international in scope as the list of contributors grows. Contributors The blog will include archivists, historians, librarians, and museum professionals. Please contact Ken Middleton (ken.middlet@gmail.com) if you are interested in being a blog contributor.
Josephine Dorado

TechSoup Digital Storytelling Challenge: Tips on Telling Your Story - 58 views

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    Digital storytelling tips
Carol Findlay

Little Bird Tales - Home - 108 views

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    wonderful for digital story telling FREE!
Emily Mann

The Wilderness Downtown - 47 views

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     Chrome Experiments of fun with html5 are meant to show off the clean and fast beauty of the new code.  Of  course Google wants you to see it in Chrome for full effect, and I would encourage that as Chrome is an easy and responsive browser, you try it out.  The Wilderness Downtown is a great example of an interactive and connected multimedia experience that mashes together Google Maps and Earth with a driving tune to blast you to your past.  Go in and enter your old address and feel the nostalgia of swooping over your childhood home with a soundtrack and pacing just for you. Students are making digital stories.  They may not be writing html5 apps, but they are accessing, or can access, many sources of media to deepen their message.  A showing of a story like what you help create with The Wilderness Downtown experiment can inspire students to consider how they can use everyday tools like Google Earth to connect with an audience. Just go to http://www.thewildernessdowntown.com/ and type in your address. 
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