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Rob Belprez

High School ELA Lesson Support by Lexiconic Education Resources - 13 views

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    This is a perfect collection of English lessons and resources for most High School Level classes.  It has all the traditional assignments, stories, skills, terms, and samples to pull from.
meldar

Teaching in the 21st Century: Choice is Key for Expository Writing - 12 views

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    "Choice is the key for expository writing"
Mark Gleeson

iPads can't improve learning without good teaching Pt 2 - Writing - 96 views

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    Covers writing skills that can be enhanced by iPads and other computers 
Kate Pok

Five Best Distraction-Free Writing Tools - 16 views

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    title says it all- distraction free writing tools
Kate Pok

11trees: Better Documents. Fewer Trees. - word add-in for grading - 121 views

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    took me ages to find this again...enfin!  Cheaper than tatoolbar!
Sandy Munnell

Teaching and Learning: Using iPads in the Classroom | Edutopia - 158 views

  • Most students today would be classified as bodily-kinesthetic learners.
    • Miss OConnor
       
      Why?  What has changed and if this is true, what are the implications in the classroom when most teachers are visual/auditory learners?
    • Sandy Munnell
       
      I would agree - making this assumption leads to other assumptions that have no scientific basis. It's a reaction to a supposed change in student learning behaviors. But it is the kind of statement that let's technology advocates jump on the bandwagon and sell their technology.
  • An app called Field Notes LT not only allows students to take copious notes of their observations, it attaches the date, time, GPS location and photographs of what is observed. These notes can be instantly shared, collaborated, and published in the field.
  • Perhaps a better question is what would I do with them that I could not do with other tools that are available and cheaper?
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    This article explores various iPad apps that could "transform" the classroom.  
Randolph Hollingsworth

EReading Pilot Project - The iPad and Reading and Writing Practices | Center for Instru... - 83 views

  • writing happens across long lengths of time, in little pockets of thinking, and that the little notes and ideas one may jot down at random times throughout a day are just as significant as those moments of longer, sustained writing. In a way, then, the iPad encouraged me as a writer to capture my thoughts in a succinct way and let them percolate for a while until I had time to expand, abandon, or adapt them later at my computer.
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    Denise Comer, Writing Program, with Kenneth Rogerson, Public Policy, and Rebecca Vidra, Environment, examined the pedagogies of integrating ereading technologies into writing intensive courses - preliminary findings are that scholarly reading is easier (notetaking easy) but extensive writing is not convenient... posits that we may be defining "writing" too rigidly
N Carroll

Shadow Poetry -- Resources -- Types of Poetry - 4 views

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    This page contains all types of poetry - gives the definition of they type of poem; the set up; and several examples.
tab_ras

Views: Technology and Teaching - Inside Higher Ed - 43 views

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    Is it a given that technology enhances the acts of writing, as it does the arts and sciences of film-making, design, engineering, data collection and analyses, and so forth? What about the teaching and learning of writing?
tab_ras

Death to high school English - Education - Salon.com - 126 views

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    Death to high school EnglishMy college students don't understand commas, far less how to write an essay. Is it time to rethink how we teach?
Beth Panitz

Everything I Know About Teaching Language Arts I Learned at the Office Supply Store - N... - 118 views

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    Great suggestions for classroom practices using ordinary office supplies.
Gerald Carey

Education Week: Teaching Digital Writing: More Than Blogs and Wikis - 1 views

  • These days, pen-and-paper and word-processing skills are not enough to fully prepare students for writing beyond K-12. Students also need direct instruction in digital writing—or writing created or read on a computer or other Internet-connected device. Digital writing requires both traditional writing skills—knowledge of the process, conventions, organizational structure, etc.—and more advanced techniques, such as the ability to meld visual, audio, and text into a single piece.
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    Join in the edweek conversation on 4th of April.
Steve Fulton

Teaching with Technology in the Middle: Research Writing 101, 2.0! - 119 views

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    A blog about a teacher's experience with using Diigo and other web tools to facilitate student's research writing.
Kate Pok

Writing in College - 1. Some crucial differences between high school and college writing - 55 views

  • you will be asked to analyze the reading, to make a worthwhile claim about it that is not obvious (state a thesis means almost the same thing), to support your claim with good reasons, all in four or five pages that are organized to present an argument .
  • They expect to see a claim that would encourage them to say, "That's interesting. I'd like to know more."
  • They expect to see evidence, reasons for your claim, evidence that would encourage them to agree with your claim, or at least to think it plausible.
  • ...8 more annotations...
  • They expect to see that you've thought about limits and objections to your claim.
  • This kind of argument is less like disagreeable wrangling, more like an amiable and lively conversation with someone whom you respect and who respects you; someone who is interested in what you have to say, but will not agree with your claims just because you state them; someone who wants to hear your reasons for believing your claims and also wants to hear answers to their questions.
  • We also know that whatever it is we think, it is never the entire truth. Our conclusions are partial, incomplete, and always subject to challenge. So we write in a way that allows others to test our reasoning: we present our best thinking as a series of claims, reasons, and responses to imagined challenges, so that readers can see not only what we think, but whether they ought to agree.
  • And that's all an argument is--not wrangling, but a serious and focused conversation among people who are intensely interested in getting to the bottom of things cooperatively.
  • So your first step in writing an assigned paper occurs well before you begin writing: You must know what your instructor expects.
  • Start by looking carefully at the words of the assignment.
  • When most of your instructors ask what the point of your paper is, they have in mind something different. By "point" or "claim" (the words are virtually synonymous with thesis), they will more often mean the most important sentence that you wrote in your essay, a sentence that appears on the page, in black in white; words that you can point to, underline, send on a postcard; a sentence that sums up the most important thing you want to say as a result of your reading, thinking, research, and writing. In that sense, you might state the point of your paper as "Well, I want to show/prove/claim/argue/demonstrate (any of those words will serve to introduce the point) that

    "Though Falstaff seems to play the role of Hal's father, he is, in fact, acting more like a younger brother who . . . .""

    If you include in your paper what appears after I want to prove that, then that's the point of your paper, its main claim that the rest of your paper supports.

  • A good point or claim typically has several key characteristics: it says something significant about what you have read, something that helps you and your readers understand it better; it says something that is not obvious, something that your reader didn't already know; it is at least mildly contestable, something that no one would agree with just by reading it; it asserts something that you can plausibly support in five pages, not something that would require a book.
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    great guide to college writing- print out and give out to students.
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