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Rachel Hinton

Nine Ways to Improve Class Discussions - 144 views

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    "I once heard class discussions described as "transient instructional events." They pass through the class, the course, and the educational experiences of students with few lingering effects. Ideas are batted around, often with forced participation; students don't take notes; and then the discussion ends-it runs out of steam or the class runs out of time. If asked a few days later about the exchange, most students would be hard-pressed to remember anything beyond what they themselves might have said, if that. So this post offers some simple suggestions for increasing the impact of the discussions that occur in our courses."
Catherine Hainstock

idebate.org - 55 views

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    IDEA is an international network teaching debate to young people. This site includes guidelines and teacher resources, a database of topics for debate, tournaments, and a system for managing tournaments if you plan to organize one in your area. Top resource!
Beverly Ozburn

Rethinking the Way College Students Are Taught - 52 views

  • But here's the irony. "Mary is more likely to convince John than professor Mazur in front of the class," Mazur says. "She's only recently learned it and still has some feeling for the conceptual difficulties that she has whereas professor Mazur learned [the idea] such a long time ago that he can no longer understand why somebody has difficulty grasping it." That's the irony of becoming an expert in your field, Mazur says. "It becomes not easier to teach, it becomes harder to teach because you're unaware of the conceptual difficulties of a beginning learner."
  • To make sure his students are prepared, Mazur has set up a web-based monitoring system where everyone has to submit answers to questions about the reading prior to coming to class. The last question asks students to tell Mazur what confused them. He uses their answers to prepare a set of multiple-choice questions he uses during class.
  • Mazur begins class by giving a brief explanation of a concept he wants students to understand. Then he asks one of the multiple-choice questions. Students get a minute to think about the question on their own and then answer it using a mobile device that sends their answers to Mazur's laptop. Next, he asks the students to turn to the person sitting next to them and talk about the question. The class typically erupts in a cacophony of voices, as it did that first time he told students to talk to each other because he couldn't figure out what else to do. Once the students have discussed the question for a few minutes, Mazur instructs them to answer the question again.
  • ...7 more annotations...
    • Beverly Ozburn
       
      Why do we continue to do things the same way we always have and expect different results from what we have always gotten?
    • Beverly Ozburn
       
      How true this statement is!  If students want to learn, they are going to learn in spite of who the teacher is or what the teacher does - no teacher is really needed!
  • So Mazur gave what he thought was a thorough and thoughtful explanation of the concept. He went slowly, putting all kinds of helpful diagrams up on the board. "I thought I'd nailed it," he says. "I thought it was the best explanation one could possibly give of this question." Mazur triumphantly turned around. "Any questions?" he asked. The students just stared at him. "Nobody raised their hand and said, well but what if this and what if that, simply because they were so confused they couldn't," he says. "I didn't know what to do. But I knew one thing. I knew that 50 percent of the students had given the right answer."
    • Beverly Ozburn
       
      How many times have we done this when we are providing direct instructions to students and then felt frustration when we assess what they know?  ARGH!
    • Beverly Ozburn
       
      Watch this video!
    • Beverly Ozburn
       
      The same probably goes for info that is simply read and not annotated or discussed.  It is probably also true for info gained from a video or movie...
    • Beverly Ozburn
       
      This would be an effective use of Socrative or WallWisher!
Jim Tiffin Jr

What makes an interactive whiteboard interactive? - Doug Johnson's Blue Skunk... - 25 views

  • But many advocates of this technology (myself included), see IWBs as genuine means of bringing more interactivity, more student-focus into classrooms of traditional teachers
  • What we don't want to forget is that someone who is coaching a teacher is not really looking for "good technology use" but for just good educational practices. Having an IWB is not going to change a lecturer into something else.
  • Any item in the Instruction domain can be enhanced using an IWB.
  • ...3 more annotations...
  • just because a teacher has an IWB doesn't mean it has to be used every minute of the day. And yes, a teacher can create truly interactive lessons without using any technology whatsoever.
  • use the SmartNotebook software that works with the hardware to organize materials, to find and share lessons, and to seamlessly blend multimedia into lessons.
  • While popular (2007, 2010, interactive white boards (IWBs) are controversial even (or especially) among technology enthusiasts. The major complaint is that the use of these devices reinforces the "sage on the stage" teaching methodology. "The IWB is little more than a fancy overhead projector and its touch sensitive screen is only used to save the teacher a couple steps back to the computer to change a slide."
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    Blog post that articulates some of the best practices for incorporating an interactive white board (IWB), like a SMART Board, into your classroom in meaningful and instructionally sound ways.
Jim Peterson

9 Questions and Answers About science teaching - 40 views

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    9. In a post, you argue that the inquiry science teaching cannot flourish with common standards. What is an alternative solution?  That's right.  We do not need a set of Common Core Standards.  I am sure that the teachers in your high school are more capable of determining the curriculum for your classmates than any national committee assembled by the most prestigious organizations in the country.  Education needs to decentralized, not centralized.  There are more than 15,000 school districts in the United States.  Do you think that one set of standards would meet the needs of these 15, 000 school districts.
Roland Gesthuizen

Questioning Toolkit - 149 views

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    Each district should create a Questioning Toolkit which contains several dozen kinds of questions and questioning tools. This Questioning Toolkit should be printed in large type on posters which reside on classroom walls close by networked, information-rich computers. Portions of the Questioning Toolkit should be introduced as early as Kindergarten so that students can bring powerful questioning technologies and techniques with them as they arrive in high school.
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