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Nigel Coutts

Asking Why and Why and Why - The Learner's Way - 16 views

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    As children, we ask "Why?" a lot. It is a part of childhood, that special time when the many forces acting upon our cognitive development converge around a singular desire to ask "Why". It becomes the central focus of our conversational style, an incessant exclamation into the void which tests the patience of any nearby adult. But asking "Why" offers so much more.
Roland Gesthuizen

Three Ways to Ask Better Questions in the Classroom | Faculty Focus - 31 views

  • We need to ask good questions so that students see the importance of questions—how they make us think and help us learn. Eventually students may start asking better questions themselves, including ones we can’t answer. And those are the best questions of all.
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    "Good questions make students think, they encourage participation and I think they improve the caliber of the answers students give and the questions they ask. To achieve those worthwhile outcomes more regularly, I'd like to recommend three actions that have the potential to improve our questioning."
anonymous

Harvard Education Letter - 126 views

  • When students know how to ask their own questions, they take greater ownership of their learning, deepen comprehension, and make new connections and discoveries on their own.
  • Typically, questions are seen as the province of teachers, who spend years figuring out how to craft questions and fine-tune them to stimulate students’ curiosity or engage them more effectively.
  • to introduce students to a new unit, to assess students’ knowledge to see what they need to understand better, and even to conclude a unit to see how students can, with new knowledge, set a fresh learning agenda for themselves. The technique can be used for all ages.
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  • ask as many questions as you can; do not stop to discuss, judge, or answer any of the questions; write down every question exactly as it was stated; and change any statements into questions.
  • for an open-ended thinking process.
  • The teacher begins this step by introducing definitions of closed- and open-ended questions.
  • “Choose the three questions you most want to explore further.”
  • Students will be asking all the questions. A teacher’s role is simply to facilitate that process. This is a significant change for students as well.
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    Mike and I have been using this in our classrooms for a few years and it has really made a difference...it helps to inspire learning.  
Roland Gesthuizen

FILLING THE TOOL BOX - 158 views

  • As one of the primary goals of education is to develop autonomous but interdependent thinkers, students deserve frequent opportunities to shape and direct classroom inquiry. To fuel this inquiry, it is also essential that we validate the importance of curiosity in the process of learning. While curiosity may have killed the cat, there is no reason for us to kill curiosity
  • Critical to all of these activities, however, is some kind of guided practice in how to think through such questions.
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    " Most of the strategies described below have been developed and tested by teachers in Princeton, Madison and elsewhere. They are offered as practical, effective activities that help shift the focus of classrooms from teacher orchestrated mastery and memory of information to student processing of information to create understanding and improve problem-solving."
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    Some great ways to stop killing curiosity and stimulate questioning in science and technology. An oldie but a goodie.
Roland Gesthuizen

Questioning Toolkit - 149 views

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    Each district should create a Questioning Toolkit which contains several dozen kinds of questions and questioning tools. This Questioning Toolkit should be printed in large type on posters which reside on classroom walls close by networked, information-rich computers. Portions of the Questioning Toolkit should be introduced as early as Kindergarten so that students can bring powerful questioning technologies and techniques with them as they arrive in high school.
Shawn Roner

The Right Way to Ask Questions in the Classroom | Edutopia - 113 views

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