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Martin Burrett

The Night Zookeeper - 85 views

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    A great site where teachers upload drawing and paintings of animals and stories that go with it. Basic account is free, but a paid for option with more features is available. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/Cross+Curricular
Martin Burrett

Into the Book - 123 views

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    A beautifully made resource showing students the different elements of a book/story and provides ideas and vocabulary for them to talk about their learning. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/English
Martin Burrett

LearnEnglish Kids - British Council - 40 views

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    Learn English Kids is a great collection of resources from the British Council for children learning English as an additional language. Play games, listen and watch stories and learn songs. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/English+As+An+Additional+Language
Beth Panitz

Writing Stories - Stenhouse Publishers - 49 views

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    Ideas, Exercises, and Encouragement for Teachers and Writers of All Ages. Free online preview of the entire book.
Gary Bertoia

Data Reveals Stories: Part One | Why do data differently? - Ewan McIntosh | Digital Med... - 1 views

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    Great series on Data 
Martin Burrett

StoryCove - 86 views

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    Story cove is a great website, especially for younger children. Watch hundreds of animated stories. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/English
Martin Burrett

Story Jumper - 79 views

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    StoryJumper: create your own children's book.
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    This looks like an amazing tool for online writing and collaboration. 
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    This is a fabulous site for creating free ebooks by uploading photos from your computer, or by using the well stocked gallery of props scenes and characters provided by the site. Just drag and drop your items into place. Books can be private or shared using a url link. A free signing is required. You can also have your ebooks made into real books for a fee. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/English
Martin Burrett

Oneword - Writing stimulus - 45 views

    • Andy Whiteway
       
      Fantastic. Share with those who are struggling to get started in their creative writing. Use as a starter in an English lesson.
    • Dimitris Tzouris
       
      Very interesting!
    • Patrick Higgins
       
      My question is how this differs from using your Writer's Notebook?  
    • Sarah Schaller Welsh
       
      I am looking for cool ideas for a creative writing course...I feel like this could be a very useful tool.
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    A great way for children to learn the art of story openings. They have 1 minute to write from a one word stimulus. The site asks for a name & email. I usually just cut and paste the work into Word instead. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/English
paul lowe

Web 2.0 Storytelling: Emergence of a New Genre (EDUCAUSE Review) | EDUCAUSE CONNECT - 3 views

  • A story has a beginning, a middle, and a cleanly wrapped-up ending. Whether told around a campfire, read from a book, or played on a DVD, a story goes from point A to B and then C. It follows a trajectory, a Freytag Pyramid—perhaps the line of a human life or the stages of the hero's journey. A story is told by one person or by a creative team to an audience that is usually quiet, even receptive. Or at least that’s what a story used to be, and that’s how a story used to be told. Today, with digital networks and social media, this pattern is changing. Stories now are open-ended, branching, hyperlinked, cross-media, participatory, exploratory, and unpredictable. And they are told in new ways: Web 2.0 storytelling picks up these new types of stories and runs with them, accelerating the pace of creation and participation while revealing new directions for narratives to flow.
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    A story has a beginning, a middle, and a cleanly wrapped-up ending. Whether told around a campfire, read from a book, or played on a DVD, a story goes from point A to B and then C. It follows a trajectory, a Freytag Pyramid-perhaps the line of a human life or the stages of the hero's journey. A story is told by one person or by a creative team to an audience that is usually quiet, even receptive. Or at least that's what a story used to be, and that's how a story used to be told. Today, with digital networks and social media, this pattern is changing. Stories now are open-ended, branching, hyperlinked, cross-media, participatory, exploratory, and unpredictable. And they are told in new ways: Web 2.0 storytelling picks up these new types of stories and runs with them, accelerating the pace of creation and participation while revealing new directions for narratives to flow.
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