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steveatschool

inklewriter - 10 views

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    inklewriter is a free tool designed to allow anyone to write and publish interactive stories. It's perfect for writers who want to try out interactivity, but also for teachers and students looking to mix computer skills and creative writing.
Cole Everett

Meograph - 61 views

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    Bring learning to life with stories
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     Four-dimensional storytelling
Martin Burrett

Cube Creator - 146 views

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    We teachers like to shake things up a bit and how better to begin than by adding a little randomness into your lessons. This is a great site that creates custom cubes which you can use as dice in class. They are easy to create and great for children make for a range of subjects and activities. Give it a roll.
    http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/Cross+Curricular
Martin Burrett

National Storytelling Week - 73 views

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    The Society for Storytelling's annual 'National Storytelling Week' is a wonderful way to kickstart sharing stories and reading in your school.
    http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/Competitions+%26+Events
Martin Burrett

Stories Unbound - 82 views

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    Find stories from amateur writers based on geographic location and upload your own.
    http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/English
Martin Burrett

StoryCove - 86 views

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    Story cove is a great website, especially for younger children. Watch hundreds of animated stories.
    http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/English
paul lowe

Web 2.0 Storytelling: Emergence of a New Genre (EDUCAUSE Review) | EDUCAUSE CONNECT - 2 views

  • A story has a beginning, a middle, and a cleanly wrapped-up ending. Whether told around a campfire, read from a book, or played on a DVD, a story goes from point A to B and then C. It follows a trajectory, a Freytag Pyramid—perhaps the line of a human life or the stages of the hero's journey. A story is told by one person or by a creative team to an audience that is usually quiet, even receptive. Or at least that’s what a story used to be, and that’s how a story used to be told. Today, with digital networks and social media, this pattern is changing. Stories now are open-ended, branching, hyperlinked, cross-media, participatory, exploratory, and unpredictable. And they are told in new ways: Web 2.0 storytelling picks up these new types of stories and runs with them, accelerating the pace of creation and participation while revealing new directions for narratives to flow.
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    A story has a beginning, a middle, and a cleanly wrapped-up ending. Whether told around a campfire, read from a book, or played on a DVD, a story goes from point A to B and then C. It follows a trajectory, a Freytag Pyramid-perhaps the line of a human life or the stages of the hero's journey. A story is told by one person or by a creative team to an audience that is usually quiet, even receptive. Or at least that's what a story used to be, and that's how a story used to be told. Today, with digital networks and social media, this pattern is changing. Stories now are open-ended, branching, hyperlinked, cross-media, participatory, exploratory, and unpredictable. And they are told in new ways: Web 2.0 storytelling picks up these new types of stories and runs with them, accelerating the pace of creation and participation while revealing new directions for narratives to flow.
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