Skip to main content

Home/ Diigo In Education/ Group items tagged reading education

Rss Feed Group items tagged

ekpeterson

Educational Leadership:Teaching Screenagers:Too Dumb for Complex Texts? - 71 views

  • Willingness to Probe
  • readers may need to sit down with them for several hours of concentration.
  • hey insert a hesitant question before moving on.
  • ...8 more annotations...
  • That willingness to pause and probe is essential, but the dispositions of digital reading run otherwise. Fast skimming is the way of the screen. B
  • they have grooved for many years a reading habit that races through texts, as is the case with texting, e-mail, Twitter, and other exchanges, 18-year-olds will have difficulty suddenly downshifting when faced with a long modernist poem.
  • They are deep and semiconscious behaviors that are difficult to change except through the diligent exercise of other reading behaviors.
  • Texts like this one are too complex to allow for rapid exit and reentry. They often originate in faraway times and places and discuss ideas and realities entirely unfamiliar to the modern teenager. To comprehend what they say requires a suspension of present concerns.
  • Finally, the comprehension of complex texts depends on a receptive posture in readers. They have to finish the labor of understanding before they talk back, and complex texts delay the reaction for hours and days.
  • Digital communications, on the other hand, especially those in the Web 2.0 grain, encourage quick response.
  • Complex texts aren't so easily judged. Often they force adolescents to confront the inferiority of their learning, the narrowness of their experience, and they recoil when they should succumb.
  • reserve a crucial place for unwired, unplugged, and unconnected learning. One hour a day of slow reading with print matter, an occasional research assignment completed without Google—any such practices that slow down and intensify the reading of complex texts will help.
aaxtell

Don't Crush Reading Motivation - Education Week - 47 views

  •  
    Teachers should embrace the idea of students choosing their own books, even if they are too hard, Barbara C. Wheatley says.
Deborah Baillesderr

Commonlit - 63 views

  •  
    "COMMONLIT is a collection of poems, short stories, news articles, historical documents, and literature for classrooms."
Wes Bolton

Serious reading takes a hit from online scanning and skimming, researchers say - The Wa... - 89 views

  •  
    "To cognitive neuroscientists, Handscombe's experience is the subject of great fascination and growing alarm. Humans, they warn, seem to be developing digital brains with new circuits for skimming through the torrent of information online. This alternative way of reading is competing with traditional deep reading circuitry developed over several millennia."
  •  
    Washington Post article on how the internet is impacting our ability to read and concentrate.
Natalie Mann

The Main Idea - 72 views

  •  
    The Main Idea provides monthly summaries of educational books in handy 8-page digests. 
Roland Gesthuizen

How to Create Nonreaders - 58 views

  •  
    "In fact, it's not really possible to motivate anyone, except perhaps yourself.  If you have enough power, sure, you can make people, including students, do things.  That's what rewards (e.g., grades) and punishments (e.g., grades) are for.  But you can't make them do those things well ... The more you rely on coercion and extrinsic inducements, as a matter of fact, the less interest students are likely to have in whatever they were induced to do."
Bill Wallace

Achievethecore.org :: Home - 46 views

    • Bill Wallace
       
      Resource for lesson plans
  •  
    "Free, high-quality resources for educators to implement the Common Core State Standards."
Jeremy Brueck

Closing in on Close Reading - 73 views

  • close reading means reading to uncover layers of meaning that lead to deep comprehension.
  • Close, analytic reading stresses engaging with a text of sufficient complexity directly and examining meaning thoroughly and methodically, encouraging students to read and reread deliberately.
  • If reading closely is the most effective way to achieve deep comprehension, then that's how we should teach students to read.
  • ...7 more annotations...
  • But the teaching of reading veered significantly off track when those personal connections (also well represented on some high-stakes state assessments) began to dominate the teaching and testing of comprehension, often leaving the text itself a distant memory.
  • the shift to teaching reading as a set of thinking strategies too often left readers with the notion that the text was simply a launching point for their musings, images that popped into their heads, and random questions that, in the end, did little to enhance their understanding of the text itself.
  • examining meaning thoroughly and analytically
  • directing attention to the text, central ideas, and supporting details
  • reflecting on meanings of individual words and sentences
  • developing ideas over the course of the text
  • The best thinkers do monitor and assess their thinking, but in the context of processing the thinking of others (Paul & Elder, 2008)
  •  
    Close Reading
Kris Cody

The Reading Brain in the Digital Age: The Science of Paper versus Screens: Scientific A... - 102 views

  • prevented them from zooming out to see a neighborhood, state or country
    • Monica Williams-Mitchell
       
      This explains, in real terms, why I've had so much struggle with online reading! Very interesting article.
  • Because of these preferences—and because getting away from multipurpose screens improves concentration—people consistently say that when they really want to dive into a text, they read it on paper
    • Kris Cody
       
      This is backed up by a recent article: Faris, Michael J., and Stuart A. Selber. "E-Book Issues In Composition: A Partial Assessment And Perspective For Teachers." Composition Forum 24.(2011): ERIC. Web. 31 Mar. 2013.
  • Surveys and consumer reports also suggest that the sensory experiences typically associated with reading—especially tactile experiences—matter to people more than one might assume.
  • ...14 more annotations...
  • When reading a paper book, one can feel the paper and ink and smooth or fold a page with one's fingers; the pages make a distinctive sound when turned; and underlining or highlighting a sentence with ink permanently alters the paper's chemistry.
  • discernible size, shape and weight.
  • Although many old and recent studies conclude that people understand what they read on paper more thoroughly than what they read on screens, the differences are often small. Some experiments, however, suggest that researchers should look not just at immediate reading comprehension, but also at long-term memory.
  • When taking the quiz, volunteers who had read study material on a monitor relied much more on remembering than on knowing, whereas students who read on paper depended equally on remembering and knowing.
  • E-ink is easy on the eyes because it reflects ambient light just like a paper book, but computer screens, smartphones and tablets like the iPad shine light directly into people's faces.
  • the American Optometric Association officially recognizes computer vision syndrome.
  • People who took the test on a computer scored lower and reported higher levels of stress and tiredness than people who completed it on paper.
  • Although people in both groups performed equally well on the READ test, those who had to scroll through the continuous text did not do as well on the attention and working-memory tests.
  • Subconsciously, many people may think of reading on a computer or tablet as a less serious affair than reading on paper. Based on a detailed 2005 survey of 113 people in northern California, Ziming Liu of San Jose State University concluded that people reading on screens take a lot of shortcuts—they spend more time browsing, scanning and hunting for keywords compared with people reading on paper, and are more likely to read a document once, and only once.
  • When reading on screens, people seem less inclined to engage in what psychologists call metacognitive learning regulation—strategies such as setting specific goals, rereading difficult sections and checking how much one has understood along the way
  • Perhaps she and her peers will grow up without the subtle bias against screens that seems to lurk in the minds of older generations.
  • They think of using an e-book, not owning an e-book,"
  • Participants in her studies say that when they really like an electronic book, they go out and get the paper version.
  • When it comes to intensively reading long pieces of plain text, paper and ink may still have the advantage. But text is not the only way to read.
  •  
    it is difficult to see any one passage in the context of the entire text.
  •  
    it is difficult to see any one passage in the context of the entire text.
psmiley

Education - AERA Essential Reading on Education and Poverty - Wiley Online Library - 4 views

  •  
    Poverty and its Impact in Education - resources to address this most pressing problem
Rob Belprez

High School ELA Lesson Support by Lexiconic Education Resources - 15 views

  •  
    This is a perfect collection of English lessons and resources for most High School Level classes.  It has all the traditional assignments, stories, skills, terms, and samples to pull from.
Christian King

Recommended Reading | Expeditionary Learning - 1 views

  •  
    A great list of recommended reading compiled by Expeditionary Learning, a site committed to developing schools which focus on student driven learning experiences.
Deborah Baillesderr

Easy English news, short news, English story, reading skills for you - 106 views

  •  
    This is a useful news site which provides the same news story written at three different levels of English, making it a wonderful tool for ESL classes and differentiating for different age groups.
    http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/English+As+An+Additional+Language
  •  
    This is such a great site. They take one news story and put it in 3-4 different reading levels.
Tanya Hudson

7 Actions that Teachers Can Take Right Now: Text Complexity » TextProject - 102 views

  •  
    Seven specific action steps for approaching complex texts in elementary school. Includes suggested texts.
Peter Beens

For Those Who Want to Lead, Read - John Coleman - Harvard Business Review - 58 views

  •  
    "Even as global literacy rates are high (84%), people are reading less and less deeply. The National Endowment for the Arts (PDF) has found that "[r]eading has declined among every group of adult Americans," and for the first time in American history, "less than half of the U.S. adult American population is reading literature." Literacy has been improving in countries like India and China, but that literacy may not translate into more or deeper reading."
1 - 20 of 82 Next › Last »
Showing 20 items per page